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When Sand Works!

TortoiseRacket

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When washed play sand is bought at a garden center where it was kept outdoors, it is OK! Why? Because the play sand absorbs the moisture from the air, it becomes clay-like. If you pat it down on the bottom of the tank, the sand sticks and dries rock like for a perfect, non-impacting substrate for bearded dragons. That’s just my 2 cents on this topic.
 

JoesMum

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The problem from a tortoise point of view is that wet sand clings to food and then gets ingested (eaten) and impacts in the gut.

It doesn’t matter what type of sand, that is what happens. I have no idea about bearded dragons, so I cannot comment, but I will not recommend it for tortoises.
 

ZEROPILOT

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That's the same way it clumps inside of a tortoises G.I. tract. Unfortunately.
Sand is a poor and dangerous substrate for a tortoise.
For a bearded dragon, I cannot say.
 

Lyn W

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Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but when you know that there are keepers whose torts have suffered painful impacted guts because the sand has stuck to their food and they have eaten it, why would you ignore the warnings and gamble with your tort's life? Or even risk running up expensive vet bills?
 

ZEROPILOT

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Is the OP only referring to sand used with bearded dragons?
I used "play" sand when I kept uromastic lizards in the 1980s. But there was nothing like this forum back then.
Just some ancient library books.
 

TechnoCheese

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I personally would not use it with a bearded dragon, unless you are 100% sure that it will not come loose. And even then, there are so many better, safe loose substrates out there for them.
 

TortoiseRacket

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This thread was intended for lizard species not tortoises. The only reason sand would impact a reptile is if it is not getting enough minerals or water. Without the proper minerals, bearded dragons would eat the soil in the wild. A small amount of sand won’t impact an animal if it is hydrated. The only reason sand is put on the bad list is because people can’t do research on the natural habits in the wild. Many people have scolded me saying I’m a foolish young kid, but the thing is, why would tile be better? Well, there is a lower risk of eating it, but where would an animal find that in the wild. And guess what? You can scold me all you want, but this is the way I do it and the way I always will. I keep my Russian tortoises on aspen. The room is kept at 60% humidity and they have lived with it happily, they’ve thrived and reproduced, babies kept the same way, no pyramiding.
 

Reptilony

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Many people have scolded me saying I’m a foolish young kid, but the thing is, why would tile be better? Well, there is a lower risk of eating it, but where would an animal find that in the wild. And guess what? You can scold me all you want, but this is the way I do it and the way I always will
You’re a foolish young kid
 

Toddrickfl1

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An animal wouldn't find tile to eat off of in the wild your right but you do realize that probably more than 90% (I don't know an exact figure) of hatchlings in the wild will die before reaching maturity right?
 

wellington

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This thread was intended for lizard species not tortoises. The only reason sand would impact a reptile is if it is not getting enough minerals or water. Without the proper minerals, bearded dragons would eat the soil in the wild. A small amount of sand won’t impact an animal if it is hydrated. The only reason sand is put on the bad list is because people can’t do research on the natural habits in the wild. Many people have scolded me saying I’m a foolish young kid, but the thing is, why would tile be better? Well, there is a lower risk of eating it, but where would an animal find that in the wild. And guess what? You can scold me all you want, but this is the way I do it and the way I always will. I keep my Russian tortoises on aspen. The room is kept at 60% humidity and they have lived with it happily, they’ve thrived and reproduced, babies kept the same way, no pyramiding.
You must realize you do not offer what they would come in contact with in the wild. You may offer some things but in the wild they have miles of room to roam and the options of sand, rock, brush etc, etc. The sad part is you think you know more then adults that have raised reptiles and tortoise way before you were even born. You should open your mind to learning from experience. Your animals would benefit from you not closing your mind!
 

Tom

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The only reason sand would impact a reptile is if it is not getting enough minerals or water. Without the proper minerals, bearded dragons would eat the soil in the wild. A small amount of sand won’t impact an animal if it is hydrated.
This is false. When you lose an animal to sand impaction, you will realize why we say what we are saying here. Too bad an animal has to die for you to learn.

It is much easier, and better, to learn from the mistakes of others, that to have to make those same mistakes yourself.
 

ascott

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This thread was intended for lizard species not tortoises. The only reason sand would impact a reptile is if it is not getting enough minerals or water. Without the proper minerals, bearded dragons would eat the soil in the wild. A small amount of sand won’t impact an animal if it is hydrated. The only reason sand is put on the bad list is because people can’t do research on the natural habits in the wild. Many people have scolded me saying I’m a foolish young kid, but the thing is, why would tile be better? Well, there is a lower risk of eating it, but where would an animal find that in the wild. And guess what? You can scold me all you want, but this is the way I do it and the way I always will. I keep my Russian tortoises on aspen. The room is kept at 60% humidity and they have lived with it happily, they’ve thrived and reproduced, babies kept the same way, no pyramiding.
I think you are having a hissy fit, which is fine. I have news for you, all is always fine, well, until it is not. As I do when I see some Ahole flying down the freeway driving like a bat out of hell...I hope all that they encounter are safe...I also hope all of the reptiles that encounter you, are also safe.

I am a little curious, how old are you? Are you a male or a female? Do you pay for your reptiles and ALL supplies?
 

TortoiseRacket

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You must realize you do not offer what they would come in contact with in the wild. You may offer some things but in the wild they have miles of room to roam and the options of sand, rock, brush etc, etc. The sad part is you think you know more then adults that have raised reptiles and tortoise way before you were even born. You should open your mind to learning from experience. Your animals would benefit from you not closing your mind!
I’m not closing my mind, I think I went over board a little and I’m very sorry about that. I respect every way people raise their pets, as long as it’s humane. I’m just saying, this works for me here because any other substrate, no matter how much water I put in it, becomes very dusty. I’m open to debate, this is just how I do it. :)
 

TortoiseRacket

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I think you are having a hissy fit, which is fine. I have news for you, all is always fine, well, until it is not. As I do when I see some Ahole flying down the freeway driving like a bat out of hell...I hope all that they encounter are safe...I also hope all of the reptiles that encounter you, are also safe.

I am a little curious, how old are you? Are you a male or a female? Do you pay for your reptiles and ALL supplies?
I did, I’m very sorry about that, I just had to get it out and I did so in the wrong way. I’m a boy, I’m 11, and I do pay for everything and do everything whether it’s hauling 200 pounds of rocks for my fish or just cleaning a cage. :)
 

TechnoCheese

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Aspen definitely isn’t a suitable substrate for a russian. Many people’s animals have become impacted and died by using it, it molds in dampness (you should be keeping it damp), and there are better substrates out there.

You should be using fine grade orchid bark or cypress mulch. Neither are dusty, and they hold the water you need for a damp substrate.

Please read up on the forum. Sand isn’t a great substrate for beardies, and aspen definitely isn’t for Russians.
 

ZEROPILOT

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Would something like small neutral colored aquarium gravel work for an arid condition lizard?
Its larger grained and there is no dust.
However, the gravel would be noisy as the animal walks across it.
 

TortoiseRacket

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Tom, I am curious. Have you ever kept bearded dragons? Have you had impaction problems with sand specifically with bearded dragons? I do not know anyone who has had a problem with sand and bearded dragons...I know some of the best bearded dragon breeders in the world. When have you proven that the above statement is false? I’m sorry, but I take information from people who have been to Australia that have documented what they do and live on in the wild. Are you really an experienced keeper? Or are you a person who sits behind their computer all day to put down other peoples ways? Because I’ve run into some of those people.
 

lilly_sand99

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Tom, I am curious. Have you ever kept bearded dragons? Have you had impaction problems with sand specifically with bearded dragons? I do not know anyone who has had a problem with sand and bearded dragons...I know some of the best bearded dragon breeders in the world. When have you proven that the above statement is false? I’m sorry, but I take information from people who have been to Australia that have documented what they do and live on in the wild. Are you really an experienced keeper? Or are you a person who sits behind their computer all day to put down other peoples ways? Because I’ve run into some of those people.
Honeys you're picking fights with people. You have your opinion. They have theirs. Everyone stated their opinions, and their facts. Please stop poking bears.
 

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