Is This Mallow??

Tom

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can you send me some mallow seeds like that!?
Sure. It goes to seed around May. You will have to remind me then. I'll send you a bunch of seed heads. You can also get the seed heads from the local stuff near you. If you grow it from seeds, it won't matter if pesticides were used on the parent plant. What I do to propagate it in new areas is grab bunches of it after it dries out and goes to seed and drop the pile where I want it to grow. When the rains come back it grows. I literally just rip whole dead clumps out of the ground and drop them wherever.

I also suspect that my tortoises disperse the seeds in their dung too, because I get an awful lot of new growth in the areas where they poop that I have not intentionally seeded. I get new pumpkin plants that way too.
 

Tom

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this is considered giant mallow in my yard. got pic off google images.
View attachment 113329
That looks just like mine at this early stage in the season. Actually bigger than most of mine, but its cooler and wetter up there where you are. Mallow likes it cool and wet. It dies when its hot and dry like it is here most of the year.
 

russian/sulcata/tortoise

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Sure. It goes to seed around May. You will have to remind me then. I'll send you a bunch of seed heads. You can also get the seed heads from the local stuff near you. If you grow it from seeds, it won't matter if pesticides were used on the parent plant. What I do to propagate it in new areas is grab bunches of it after it dries out and goes to seed and drop the pile where I want it to grow. When the rains come back it grows. I literally just rip whole dead clumps out of the ground and drop them wherever.

I also suspect that my tortoises disperse the seeds in their dung too, because I get an awful lot of new growth in the areas where they poop that I have not intentionally seeded. I get new pumpkin plants that way too.
is there any where i can order mallow?
 

Iochroma

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Yes. There are many species in this family. There are at least two of the weed type that I know of, but if I'm not mistaken, hibiscus and lavatera are also in this family. Also sometimes it grows really large round leaves at my place, sometimes little ones and sometimes mine grow all wrinkly too.

I'll bet @Iochroma could help educate us a bit more on this. Please. :)
I'm afraid I'm not that great at identifying mallow with leaf alone. It really would be important to have very good photos of flowers to make an educated guess.
There are many, many species in this family found as natives and introduced weeds. Your local agricultural university website may be able to help with those found in your area.
Important members include:
Hibiscus - this genus include tropical species, and hardy ones like "Rose of Sharon". Fantastic genus with many beautiful flowering shrubs.
Malva - true "mallows". Many of the weedy species found in the temperate zone are in this. The origin of the marshmallow is from one of these.
Alcea - "hollyhocks" common in gardens are a short-lived perennial example
Lavatera - "tree mallows" include many shrubby perennials
Abutilon - "flowering maples" also shrubby perennials and small trees including some wonderful garden hybrids (and a few weeds)
Cotton and Okra are also in this family.

All the above have edible flowers and leaves, although some are not as palatable. Abutilons are particularly tasty.
 

russian/sulcata/tortoise

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I'm afraid I'm not that great at identifying mallow with leaf alone. It really would be important to have very good photos of flowers to make an educated guess.
There are many, many species in this family found as natives and introduced weeds. Your local agricultural university website may be able to help with those found in your area.
Important members include:
Hibiscus - this genus include tropical species, and hardy ones like "Rose of Sharon". Fantastic genus with many beautiful flowering shrubs.
Malva - true "mallows". Many of the weedy species found in the temperate zone are in this. The origin of the marshmallow is from one of these.
Alcea - "hollyhocks" common in gardens are a short-lived perennial example
Lavatera - "tree mallows" include many shrubby perennials
Abutilon - "flowering maples" also shrubby perennials and small trees including some wonderful garden hybrids (and a few weeds)
Cotton and Okra are also in this family.

All the above have edible flowers and leaves, although some are not as palatable. Abutilons are particularly tasty.
why do you know so much about plants?
 

Elohi

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In San Francisco this gets over 8 feet (2.4 meters). Hollyhocks can be giant things too with leaves over a foot across and heights of 10 feet plus (3 m.).
I'm ordering these, will they do ok in south central Texas?
 

Iochroma

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I will have to plead ignorance on gardening in your climate (West Coast all my life). In a general way they appreciate a lot of water and fertilizer. They seem to attain the largest size in cooler milder climates. Your local garden center could advise you on the best mallow species for your climate.
 

Prairie Mom

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I'm growing "Marsh Mallow" that I bought from Amazon under grow lights right now (Nothing grows where I live this time of year). My tortoise really likes Mallow too. I hope to get more growing in my yard.

I also have Hollyhocks in my yard. I have a nice deep read and a peach color that is kind of a rare color in the garden. This Autumn, I took off a few Hollyhock stalks that had gone to seed and dried. I've picked out the seeds from the pods from time to time and grown Hollyhock seedlings just to mix in my sulcata's greens. Hollyhocks are beautiful and come in so many colors. I highly recommend them...my tortoise eats the flowers and leaves, plus they give so many seeds each year that you can easily grow more just for the greens. They're a pretty gift that keeps on giving:)
 

Prairie Mom

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I will have to plead ignorance on gardening in your climate (West Coast all my life). In a general way they appreciate a lot of water and fertilizer. They seem to attain the largest size in cooler milder climates. Your local garden center could advise you on the best mallow species for your climate.
I saw a few lochroma in a catalogue the other day and thought of you! :) None of the plants were as pretty as the interesting blue one you have in your profile photo.
 

Prairie Mom

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I'm growing "Marsh Mallow" that I bought from Amazon under grow lights right now (Nothing grows where I live this time of year). My tortoise really likes Mallow too. I hope to get more growing in my yard.

I also have Hollyhocks in my yard. I have a nice deep read and a peach color that is kind of a rare color in the garden. This Autumn, I took off a few Hollyhock stalks that had gone to seed and dried. I've picked out the seeds from the pods from time to time and grown Hollyhock seedlings just to mix in my sulcata's greens. Hollyhocks are beautiful and come in so many colors. I highly recommend them...my tortoise eats the flowers and leaves, plus they give so many seeds each year that you can easily grow more just for the greens. They're a pretty gift that keeps on giving:)
I'm planting a ton of tortoise food today, so I thought I'd post a couple photos to show what I'm talking about. I have some really pretty Hollyhocks in my yard that I use as ornamental flowers and healthy tortoise snacks. Each autumn they produce SO MANY seeds that I have easily been growing the young seedlings as part of my tortoise greens this winter:)

Small dried Hollyhock stalk. Each seed pod on this very small stalk is full of what seems like a HUNDRED seeds!
dried hollyhock stalk.jpg

close up of seed pod:
dried hollyhock stalk seeds.jpg
 

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