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Bubbly nose

Tinker27

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May 17, 2019
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My baby was doing the exact same thing, after scaring myself to death searching Google I took her to see the vet. she said they are very good at fighting the infection off as long as she is kept warm, carry on bathing as usual and just keep an eye on her. She advised if it carried on after 3-4 weeks to take her back and they would look at finding am antibiotic dose for her. Touch wood I haven't observed her doing it over the last week so fingers crossed she has fought it off. The vet explained they were quite like us with antibiotics and if started too young they can become immune!
 

mark1

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I seriously doubt if anyone (human) went to a doctor with bacterial pneumonia , or a known bacterial infection they'd be sent away without antibiotics …….pneumonia I believe may be the #1 cause of death for kids under 5 yrs worldwide , I don't believe it's in the top #5 in the united states , may not be in the top #10 , i'd imagine due to access to antibiotics ……….. I agree with Zovick , much better to treat a disease early on , and i'm sure it correlates to a higher success rate ………. proper dose and duration of antibiotic therapy is how you prevent bacterial immunity , age of host really has no bearing on it ……….. turtles and tortoises have fixed ribs , they cannot clear their lungs very well , it's my understanding pneumonia is particularly dangerous to them …….. bacterial lung infections I think I read are one of the leading causes of sepsis ………… jmo ……..

I believe one of the drops you are using is a steroid , which will mask symptoms , it'd also suppress immune response , which would seem counterproductive …..... one of my vets told me about some outside animals I have , " in nature they get sick or injured , some persist and survive , in captivity we do what we can to help them persist and survive "
 

Ben02

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I seriously doubt if anyone (human) went to a doctor with bacterial pneumonia , or a known bacterial infection they'd be sent away without antibiotics …….pneumonia I believe may be the #1 cause of death for kids under 5 yrs worldwide , I don't believe it's in the top #5 in the united states , may not be in the top #10 , i'd imagine due to access to antibiotics ……….. I agree with Zovick , much better to treat a disease early on , and i'm sure it correlates to a higher success rate ………. proper dose and duration of antibiotic therapy is how you prevent bacterial immunity , age of host really has no bearing on it ……….. turtles and tortoises have fixed ribs , they cannot clear their lungs very well , it's my understanding pneumonia is particularly dangerous to them …….. bacterial lung infections I think I read are one of the leading causes of sepsis ………… jmo ……..

I believe one of the drops you are using is a steroid , which will mask symptoms , it'd also suppress immune response , which would seem counterproductive …..... one of my vets told me about some outside animals I have , " in nature they get sick or injured , some persist and survive , in captivity we do what we can to help them persist and survive "
Tortoises can not clear the fluid in their lungs which leaves the fluid, phlegmy substance just sitting their as you said. Sepsis Is probably not to rare with torts with pneumonia I can imagine, I can kind of guess the bacteria would spread through the body and into the blood as it’s already inside the tort. I’ve only seen one tort with pneumonia, not pleasant at all.

To @TortillaTheTortioise, I would say due to the input of other members, maybe book an appointment and carry on the warm soaks and keep things toasty. Perhaps try to get him a bit more active if he’s a tort that likes to chase food, if he’s not such a bold tort than that’s not a good idea to cause stress. Feed some good weedy greens.
 

TortillaTheTortioise

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I seriously doubt if anyone (human) went to a doctor with bacterial pneumonia , or a known bacterial infection they'd be sent away without antibiotics …….pneumonia I believe may be the #1 cause of death for kids under 5 yrs worldwide , I don't believe it's in the top #5 in the united states , may not be in the top #10 , i'd imagine due to access to antibiotics ……….. I agree with Zovick , much better to treat a disease early on , and i'm sure it correlates to a higher success rate ………. proper dose and duration of antibiotic therapy is how you prevent bacterial immunity , age of host really has no bearing on it ……….. turtles and tortoises have fixed ribs , they cannot clear their lungs very well , it's my understanding pneumonia is particularly dangerous to them …….. bacterial lung infections I think I read are one of the leading causes of sepsis ………… jmo ……..

I believe one of the drops you are using is a steroid , which will mask symptoms , it'd also suppress immune response , which would seem counterproductive …..... one of my vets told me about some outside animals I have , " in nature they get sick or injured , some persist and survive , in captivity we do what we can to help them persist and survive "
Which one is a steroid?
 

Gijoux

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As this thread has demonstrated, different individuals feel quite differently about how quickly they may or may not want to rush to the vet for intervention. I understand the hesitation many have in making recommendations, because no one can know what the outcome may be. I am sure there are many tortoise keepers on this forum who will tell you that antibiotics have appeared to have saved as many of their torts as they have not. Antibiotics are just that Anti-life and they kill just as many good bacteria as bad. If the "correct" antibiotic is not not given long enough it can create a situation where the bacteria become "resistant" and in the future those bacteria cannot ever be killed with antibiotics. They should be used as a last resort, but of course trying to figure out "when" to use them can be the very difficult decision. Tortilla the Tortoise has asked what home remedies may help her tortoise and I for one am very grateful to see both sides of the debate being offered here. We all want the very best for the Tortoise.

More studies are being published, even in the world of turtles, showing the importance of a healthy and diverse microbiota. We must understand that even one course of antibiotics will affect the patient for many, many years so it must be used as a last resort. Culturing the discharge from her nose would be very helpful in determining exactly what is causing the illness. Because this tortoise is quite young even its future growth could be affected by antibiotics. On the other hand when truly needed and when prescribed appropriately it could save the Tortoise's life.

I recall an adult Tortoise that demonstrated a Bubbly nose, difficulty breathing, clicking and bobbing of the head that went on for a couple of weeks. Upon close observation it turned out the Tortoise had a piece of grass (1 1/2 inches) stuck in her nose. Once it was removed all symptoms were gone within 24 hours.

I have found that Probiotics can be very helpful in preventing all infections. Studies have shown that Multiple Strain formulas work the best. I would recommend this even over Calcium supplementation. A good diet enhances good Gastrointestinal Microbiota, which is unfortunately lacking in so many tortoises' diets, due to the reliance on grocery store produce. So lots of Sunshine (Vitamin D3), highly nutritious and varied diet, warm humid environment and Probiotics will enhance the immune system. Prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Has anyone here on the forum used the product Reptaid/Reptaid XL by Amber Technology with their tortoises? It is an antioxidant rich botanical support product which could support immunity, upper respiratory functions, eyes & mouth health and healthy digestion. Just wondering if anyone else has found it helpful. They make 2 versions, Reptaid for Tortoise less than 250 grams and Reptaid XL for those 250 grams and larger in a measured dose. I found it very supportive once when one of my gals (17 lb. Leopard Tortoise) developed an upper respiratory infection after a stressful winter and subsequent move. After 5 days her symptoms subsided and after 10 days her symptoms were gone. It might be worth trying it while deciding if a visit to the vet is truly in required.
 

TortillaTheTortioise

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Beclomethasone is a steroid.
As this thread has demonstrated, different individuals feel quite differently about how quickly they may or may not want to rush to the vet for intervention. I understand the hesitation many have in making recommendations, because no one can know what the outcome may be. I am sure there are many tortoise keepers on this forum who will tell you that antibiotics have appeared to have saved as many of their torts as they have not. Antibiotics are just that Anti-life and they kill just as many good bacteria as bad. If the "correct" antibiotic is not not given long enough it can create a situation where the bacteria become "resistant" and in the future those bacteria cannot ever be killed with antibiotics. They should be used as a last resort, but of course trying to figure out "when" to use them can be the very difficult decision. Tortilla the Tortoise has asked what home remedies may help her tortoise and I for one am very grateful to see both sides of the debate being offered here. We all want the very best for the Tortoise.

More studies are being published, even in the world of turtles, showing the importance of a healthy and diverse microbiota. We must understand that even one course of antibiotics will affect the patient for many, many years so it must be used as a last resort. Culturing the discharge from her nose would be very helpful in determining exactly what is causing the illness. Because this tortoise is quite young even its future growth could be affected by antibiotics. On the other hand when truly needed and when prescribed appropriately it could save the Tortoise's life.

I recall an adult Tortoise that demonstrated a Bubbly nose, difficulty breathing, clicking and bobbing of the head that went on for a couple of weeks. Upon close observation it turned out the Tortoise had a piece of grass (1 1/2 inches) stuck in her nose. Once it was removed all symptoms were gone within 24 hours.

I have found that Probiotics can be very helpful in preventing all infections. Studies have shown that Multiple Strain formulas work the best. I would recommend this even over Calcium supplementation. A good diet enhances good Gastrointestinal Microbiota, which is unfortunately lacking in so many tortoises' diets, due to the reliance on grocery store produce. So lots of Sunshine (Vitamin D3), highly nutritious and varied diet, warm humid environment and Probiotics will enhance the immune system. Prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Has anyone here on the forum used the product Reptaid/Reptaid XL by Amber Technology with their tortoises? It is an antioxidant rich botanical support product which could support immunity, upper respiratory functions, eyes & mouth health and healthy digestion. Just wondering if anyone else has found it helpful. They make 2 versions, Reptaid for Tortoise less than 250 grams and Reptaid XL for those 250 grams and larger in a measured dose. I found it very supportive once when one of my gals (17 lb. Leopard Tortoise) developed an upper respiratory infection after a stressful winter and subsequent move. After 5 days her symptoms subsided and after 10 days her symptoms were gone. It might be worth trying it while deciding if a visit to the vet is truly in required.
The reason I'm hesitant about a vet is because his been getting alot better and is eating and active still so I don't want to disturb anything, but at the same time I want him to get the right medicine and care, I don't want something to go wrong because he is so small (only 30 grams) and gets medicine he doesn't need. Angulates are not commonly kept as pets and cannot use baytril because they are allergic to it so what else can't they use Do the vets really know what medicines to use on his species and what his allergic to or not?
 

Ben02

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Joined
Oct 21, 2018
Messages
1,800
Location (City and/or State)
Brighton, Southcoast, UK
As this thread has demonstrated, different individuals feel quite differently about how quickly they may or may not want to rush to the vet for intervention. I understand the hesitation many have in making recommendations, because no one can know what the outcome may be. I am sure there are many tortoise keepers on this forum who will tell you that antibiotics have appeared to have saved as many of their torts as they have not. Antibiotics are just that Anti-life and they kill just as many good bacteria as bad. If the "correct" antibiotic is not not given long enough it can create a situation where the bacteria become "resistant" and in the future those bacteria cannot ever be killed with antibiotics. They should be used as a last resort, but of course trying to figure out "when" to use them can be the very difficult decision. Tortilla the Tortoise has asked what home remedies may help her tortoise and I for one am very grateful to see both sides of the debate being offered here. We all want the very best for the Tortoise.

More studies are being published, even in the world of turtles, showing the importance of a healthy and diverse microbiota. We must understand that even one course of antibiotics will affect the patient for many, many years so it must be used as a last resort. Culturing the discharge from her nose would be very helpful in determining exactly what is causing the illness. Because this tortoise is quite young even its future growth could be affected by antibiotics. On the other hand when truly needed and when prescribed appropriately it could save the Tortoise's life.

I recall an adult Tortoise that demonstrated a Bubbly nose, difficulty breathing, clicking and bobbing of the head that went on for a couple of weeks. Upon close observation it turned out the Tortoise had a piece of grass (1 1/2 inches) stuck in her nose. Once it was removed all symptoms were gone within 24 hours.

I have found that Probiotics can be very helpful in preventing all infections. Studies have shown that Multiple Strain formulas work the best. I would recommend this even over Calcium supplementation. A good diet enhances good Gastrointestinal Microbiota, which is unfortunately lacking in so many tortoises' diets, due to the reliance on grocery store produce. So lots of Sunshine (Vitamin D3), highly nutritious and varied diet, warm humid environment and Probiotics will enhance the immune system. Prevention is worth a pound of cure.

Has anyone here on the forum used the product Reptaid/Reptaid XL by Amber Technology with their tortoises? It is an antioxidant rich botanical support product which could support immunity, upper respiratory functions, eyes & mouth health and healthy digestion. Just wondering if anyone else has found it helpful. They make 2 versions, Reptaid for Tortoise less than 250 grams and Reptaid XL for those 250 grams and larger in a measured dose. I found it very supportive once when one of my gals (17 lb. Leopard Tortoise) developed an upper respiratory infection after a stressful winter and subsequent move. After 5 days her symptoms subsided and after 10 days her symptoms were gone. It might be worth trying it while deciding if a visit to the vet is truly in required.
I’m not sure I’ve heard of that stuff before, sounds like something to get for the tort medicine cabinet. As you mentioned about the piece of grass, m i definitely think torts have very sensitive nares, I’ve seen it happen with the tiniest bit of coco coir which set of bubbles to clear it along with the tortoise trying to remove it. As there are many culprits to causing respiratory issues whether it’s humidity, temperature or nasal irritations, I would try to correct all these issues first before consulting a vet. However if the tort is not eating or looks sick, even if the keeper is deeply concerned than I would urge them to see a vet ASAP
 

CarolM

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A natural remedy maybe worth a try if you can find it is Kalachoe spp. If you go and have a look at the website www.carecentre.org.za look under the common weeds and plants there is a list with pictures of the plants that Angulata like and can eat. Anyway the point is, there is also a natural way to help with the RI besides the environment of its living space. See the attached picture. Screenshot_20190602-211057_Samsung%20Internet.jpeg
 

Ben02

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A natural remedy maybe worth a try if you can find it is Kalachoe spp. If you go and have a look at the website www.carecentre.org.za look under the common weeds and plants there is a list with pictures of the plants that Angulata like and can eat. Anyway the point is, there is also a natural way to help with the RI besides the environment of its living space. See the attached picture. View attachment 273727
Is that plant native to south Africa Carol?
That's definitely worth growing for all tort keepers.
 

mark1

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between the dogs I've raised , the reptiles I've raised , the fish , the birds , the cats , the kids I've raised and myself , I couldn't even begin to estimate the antibiotics I've used , i'm sure there are 5-6 different kinds here right now , and probably has been everyday for the last 40yrs …….. personally I've never firsthand seen an issue from them ………… as far as diagnosing exactly what the problem is before trying a treatment , that is often impractical , human doctors guess often , it's not uncommon for human doctors to use antibiotics as preventatives ……….. my dogs vets initially guess most of the time …….. likewise , possibly more so , the herp vet ……….. I've seen plenty of false negatives and false positives in vet and human medical test results ……….. I believe ceftazidime was suggested , I've never seen a bad consequence from it , other than not working ……… I've got turtles still here that were bombarded with antibiotics 10-20+ years past , drugs like baytril , flagyl and panacur as a prophylaxis …….. as far as my opinion on when to turn to antibiotics ? when i'm convinced they're sick , I do realize that in itself takes experience , knowing how normal and abnormal animals act , from seeing many of them for many years ……. I think folks think their animal is sick often when they're not , and as often I think folks don't recognize they're animal is sick until it's at deaths door ……. as far as last resort , personally I think that is a mistake that has a lot to do with the bad rap vets get ……. I do agree that optimum body temp does make a lot of sick appearing animals become well appearing animals , i'm sure for a variety of reasons …...
 

Sterant

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Hi. Your tortoise has a respiratory infection. It needs warm temperatures as many have said, but it needs more than just increased temperatures. The clicking when breathing is a bad sign. If it were my tortoise, it would be getting injections of Ceftazidime every two or three days (every three days if the symptoms aren't too bad, every other day if they are more severe).

Additionally, you can get ophthalmic drops from your vet and try to drop one drop in each eye and a drop into the nostrils 3-4 times daily. The tear ducts and nostrils drain into the respiratory tract and the sinuses and help fight the infection. These drops are dexamethasone, polymyxin B, and neomycin. You could try the drops first (they are less costly) and if the symptoms don't go away in a few days, then go for the Ceftazidime injections as well.

Good luck,

Bill Z
We all have different experiences with tortoises, but in MY experience, doing exactly what @zovick says is always a safe bet !
 

CarolM

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Is that plant native to south Africa Carol?
That's definitely worth growing for all tort keepers.
I think so. The problem is if I google kalanchoe spp it does not look like that one in the pic. But it is worth a look at the list of foods on thw website for those who have leopards and Angulata. I have seen a plant that looks like the one in the pic here in Cape Town. Not sure though if it only grows here.
 

TortillaTheTortioise

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I think so. The problem is if I google kalanchoe spp it does not look like that one in the pic. But it is worth a look at the list of foods on thw website for those who have leopards and Angulata. I have seen a plant that looks like the one in the pic here in Cape Town. Not sure though if it only grows here.
I also tried to google it and it came up with a variety of different plants under the heading. I read on that site that broad leaf plantago is good for respiratory infections, I'm getting tortilla some today. His breathing has stopped clicking and I can only hear a faint rasp when I put his face to my ear but previously I could hear without doing that, does this mean his getting better? Ive been googling symptoms of pneumonia and he only has 1 which is the breathing, haven't seen discharge since Friday
 
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CarolM

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I also tried to google it and it came up with a variety of different plants under the heading. I read on that site that broad leaf plantago is good for respiratory infections, I'm getting tortilla some today. His breathing has stopped clicking and I can only hear a faint rasp when I put his face to my ear but previously I could hear without doing that, does this mean his getting better? Ive been googling symptoms of pneumonia and he only has 1 which is the breathing, haven't seen discharge since Friday
I really don't have enough experience with them when they are sick. But I would presume that he is getting better. I would just keep an eye on him for quite a while still and to make sure that his temps and environment are improved. Also now that winter is here, you should be seeing much more healthy weeds which you can get for him to eat. Start getting more variety into his diet. Look for some of the weeds that are on that list. They are all good sources for the needed vitamins that will help to build up his strength and immune system.
 

Lime pickle

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Re tortilla the tortoise. The advice given by Zovick was Spot On. I’m really pleased that your tortoise is improving. But if he does deteriorate then please don’t hesitate and get him straight to a vet. He really won’t live long otherwise . I also have many years experience of tortoises. Good luck.
 

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