Western Hermann Diet

Taylorlynn48

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Messages
469
Location (City and/or State)
Abington
I have generated a food list for my western- add or comment if you agree/disagree with the list.
Or what you believe to only be in moderation.

Watercress
Leafy Lettuce
Dandelion
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Parsley
Bell Pepper
Kale
Clover
Corriander
Parsnip
Broccoli
Grasses & Weeds
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
53,367
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
I have generated a food list for my western- add or comment if you agree/disagree with the list.
Or what you believe to only be in moderation.

Watercress
Leafy Lettuce
Dandelion
Cabbage
Carrots
Cauliflower
Parsley
Bell Pepper
Kale
Clover
Corriander
Parsnip
Broccoli
Grasses & Weeds
The diet for any Testudo should be mostly broadleaf weeds. I'd omit cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and carrots completely. They are not grass eaters, though eating grass will not harm them and can be used to add fiber to grocery store greens. All the the grocery store lettuce and greens will need to be amended by adding dried leaves from @Kapidolo Farms , herbal hay from @TylerStewart at tortoisesupply.com, soaked Zoomed pellets of either type, soaked horse hay pellets, or the previously mentioned freshly sprouted grass all chopped up and mixed in.

Don't forget leaves and flowers like grape vine leaves, mulberry leaves, hibiscus and rose of sharon leaves, rose leaves and flowers, and many more. Try to stick to "natural" food over grocery store greens when possible.
 

Taylorlynn48

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Messages
469
Location (City and/or State)
Abington
The diet for any Testudo should be mostly broadleaf weeds. I'd omit cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and carrots completely. They are not grass eaters, though eating grass will not harm them and can be used to add fiber to grocery store greens. All the the grocery store lettuce and greens will need to be amended by adding dried leaves from @Kapidolo Farms , herbal hay from @TylerStewart at tortoisesupply.com, soaked Zoomed pellets of either type, soaked horse hay pellets, or the previously mentioned freshly sprouted grass all chopped up and mixed in.

Don't forget leaves and flowers like grape vine leaves, mulberry leaves, hibiscus and rose of sharon leaves, rose leaves and flowers, and many more. Try to stick to "natural" food over grocery store greens when possible.
I already do lettuces with kapidolo's dry herb mixes for my Russian along with fresh dandelion/weeds.
I am currently trying to grow some pansys and aloe for my Russian.

The only hibiscus plants I can get a hold of are fertilized from lowes, home depot. (Which I know is a NO NO)

Western Hermann's enjoy herbal hay or horse hay pellets?
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
53,367
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
Western Hermann's enjoy herbal hay or horse hay pellets?
Herbal hay is a mixture of dried flowers. Its great stuff. Once introduced to it, every Testudo I've offer it to LOVED it. They would eat every scrap and particle and leave none behind.

The horse hay pellets are a way to add much needed fiber to the grocery store greens which tend to lack fiber.

All of the above are listed as ways to improve grocery store greens and make them a more acceptable diet for any tortoise.
The only hibiscus plants I can get a hold of are fertilized from lowes, home depot. (Which I know is a NO NO)
Grow your own from cuttings of established plants, or from seed. Grape vines are intended for human consumption, so they lack the systemic pesticides.
 

RosemaryDW

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Feb 17, 2016
Messages
3,803
Location (City and/or State)
Newport Coast, CA
With the exception of the occasional top of a carrot or small slice of red bell pepper my tortoise doesn’t get anything else on that list that is not clearly leafy.

If you do want to give him an acceptable fruit (and yes, these are fruits if you can believe it), summer squash/zucchini; any hard winter squash; or less occasionally cucumber are better options. I’ll offer a small bit of yam or sweet potato as well now and again. There’s definitely some sugar in the things that are red and orange but some extra nutrients as well so a little is okay.

I’d be surprised if your tortoise ate parsley, the strong smell can be offputting. Coriander is also hit or miss but if he’ll eat it, great.

Are you in the U.K.? Florette Classic Crispy is a good mix, less sugar than some of the floppier lettuces.
 

Taylorlynn48

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2020
Messages
469
Location (City and/or State)
Abington
With the exception of the occasional top of a carrot or small slice of red bell pepper my tortoise doesn’t get anything else on that list that is not clearly leafy.

If you do want to give him an acceptable fruit (and yes, these are fruits if you can believe it), summer squash/zucchini; any hard winter squash; or less occasionally cucumber are better options. I’ll offer a small bit of yam or sweet potato as well now and again. There’s definitely some sugar in the things that are red and orange but some extra nutrients as well so a little is okay.

I’d be surprised if your tortoise ate parsley, the strong smell can be offputting. Coriander is also hit or miss but if he’ll eat it, great.

Are you in the U.K.? Florette Classic Crispy is a good mix, less sugar than some of the floppier lettuces.
I like fresh parsley on my pizza from the garden outback! xD

I did not even know that lettuce has sugar.. or carbs?

I am from the Greater Philadelphia area, in Abington PA
 

RosemaryDW

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Feb 17, 2016
Messages
3,803
Location (City and/or State)
Newport Coast, CA
Okay, that Abington, okay. In that case you might look for the Santa Barbara blend from the Ready Pac brand.

Yes, there are sugars, and carbs and even a little plant protein in lettuces. Humans have bred lettuces to taste less bitter over time and that means more sugar. It’s not a ton, but if you have the opportunity it’s encouraged to feed the soft, leaf lettuces less often. What you will find in the blend above is chicories only—some of the more bitter lettuces: escarole, endive, and radicchio. Frisee and curly escarole are others. Your store might even sell something labeled as dandelions in the chicory section. They won’t look like the dandelions you and I are used to but they are a relative. They all have a bit more fiber as well. Your tortoise might not take to them right away if he’s been eating something sweeter but he’ll give them a chance at some point.

Since you are doing some grocery store shopping you might occasionally throw in some turnip or radish tops, the occasional bok choy. A couple of okra or a small mushroom are nice “treats” to feed on occasion, quite healthy. The nice thing about shopping in a grocery store is that you can buy only two okra, rather than a full bag or such. :)
 
Top