mud / musk turtles with fish?

birdnorth

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Sorry to bother anyone but I've been looking for info about maybe getting a new turtle tank and have been getting mixed results. I want to be able to keep them with fish and have read that mud and musk turtles are best for that. are they better with fish than say a diamond backed terrapin? Also, would big and sub fish like blood parrots, Congo spotted puffers, archers, or clown loaches work? this is probably a huge stretch but what about a goldfish like a comet or a Lionhead? naturally, I would wait for the fish to be at least as large as the turtles max size before adding the turtle. Also, what are some personality, temperament, or care differences between mud and musk turtles? I have only found info about their physical differences. Lastly, the tank would be a large one. likely a 75 at minimum of not a 120 or 125.
 

Markw84

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I keep all kinds of turtles with all kinds of fish. But all the turtles and most of the fish that I keep are temperate N American species. I keep the young ones in tanks their first year or so, then they all go into the pond or get sold.

Most all turtles will do OK with fish. However, if the fish is sick or stressed like when brand new, the turtle will try to make it an opportunistic meal. I would recommend against a lionhead or an fish that is not a good, efficient swimmer. In my pond I have well over 60-70 turtles. I keep koi, high fin sharks, minnows, bluegill, mosquito fish and a sturgeon with them.

Cooters are the best turtles to keep with fish by far. None of mine have ever shown the least bit of interest in a fish - and I have some very large cooters. But that's the issue with cooters - they get very big. Great for ponds with koi, though.

I've also never seen any of my Maps go after fish, even when young.

Spotted and mud turtles will go after small fish, but are not good at catching them. Once established in a tank, a fish is normally safe unless it gets sick. Musk turtles are just a tad bit more predatory, but again not good at catching a healthy fish. I always keep fish in the tanks with these turtles.

Diamondbacks will leave fish alone. They live for shrimp, snails and clams. But they really need brackish water or they get really susceptible to skin and shell rot.

Your sliders and painted like to chase fish. Painted in particular can be the ones to constantly leave "V" marks in the fins of even the largest fish. Some aren't interested, but some painted certainly are. ON several occasions I have seen one of my western painteds that is about 8" latched onto a fin of a koi that is over 24" going for a wild ride as the koi tries to shake it.
 

birdnorth

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so are you saying that musk and mud turtles will go after fish often but are usually not successful, and painted and terrapins will go after them less often but if they do decide to go after them, they are more likely to kill? are mud and mud turtles equally aggressive? I probably should add that the puffers are toxic.
 

birdnorth

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I keep all kinds of turtles with all kinds of fish. But all the turtles and most of the fish that I keep are temperate N American species. I keep the young ones in tanks their first year or so, then they all go into the pond or get sold.

Most all turtles will do OK with fish. However, if the fish is sick or stressed like when brand new, the turtle will try to make it an opportunistic meal. I would recommend against a lionhead or an fish that is not a good, efficient swimmer. In my pond I have well over 60-70 turtles. I keep koi, high fin sharks, minnows, bluegill, mosquito fish and a sturgeon with them.

Cooters are the best turtles to keep with fish by far. None of mine have ever shown the least bit of interest in a fish - and I have some very large cooters. But that's the issue with cooters - they get very big. Great for ponds with koi, though.

I've also never seen any of my Maps go after fish, even when young.

Spotted and mud turtles will go after small fish, but are not good at catching them. Once established in a tank, a fish is normally safe unless it gets sick. Musk turtles are just a tad bit more predatory, but again not good at catching a healthy fish. I always keep fish in the tanks with these turtles.

Diamondbacks will leave fish alone. They live for shrimp, snails and clams. But they really need brackish water or they get really susceptible to skin and shell rot.

Your sliders and painted like to chase fish. Painted in particular can be the ones to constantly leave "V" marks in the fins of even the largest fish. Some aren't interested, but some painted certainly are. ON several occasions I have seen one of my western painteds that is about 8" latched onto a fin of a koi that is over 24" going for a wild ride as the koi tries to shake it.
is that it? (I forgot to post the last one as a reply so that's the real message. my bad.)
 

Markw84

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so are you saying that musk and mud turtles will go after fish often but are usually not successful, and painted and terrapins will go after them less often but if they do decide to go after them, they are more likely to kill? are mud and mud turtles equally aggressive? I probably should add that the puffers are toxic.
Mud and musk do not go after fish often. But if a very small fish and especially sick or weak, they can. Painted will go after fish much more often, although some do and some don't at all. So their own personality comes into play.

I do not consider mud and musk aggressive. They are opportunistic.

With other turtles in the tank, musk also are tail nippers. They love worms and see tails as worms apparently.

Puffers would not be a good choice at all. They are not fast swimmers and would appear an easy target by the way they swim.
 

Moozillion

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My razor backed musk turtle makes no attempt to get the fish he lives with- Cory catfish and guppies.
My mud turtle is more aggressive, but has only caught the earthworms i drop in.
 

birdnorth

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My razor backed musk turtle makes no attempt to get the fish he lives with- Cory catfish and guppies.
My mud turtle is more aggressive, but has only caught the earthworms i drop in.
what kind of musk turtles do you have?
 

Toddrickfl1

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I have basking turtles and in my experience as long as the enclosure is large enough the turtles don't bother the fish. I have Comets, Koi, and Guppies in my turtle pond. The Comets actually swarm the turtles while they're eating and get the crumbs lol.
 

birdnorth

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I've been doing some more research and saw that turtles like razorback musk and three striped muds do better in deep water r because they are good swimmers. this would be good because the tank would be kinda deep. would this also mean that it would be easier for them to attack the fish?
 
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Hi, I am currently housing two hatchling turtle in a well established Aquarium tank. These two hatchling turtles are a Razorback Musk Turtle, and a Diamondback Terrapin that was captive bred and born in freshwater. The fish that are in the tank is a school of Neon Tetra, A cory catfish and a Male Guppy alongside a Ghost Shrimp. I have lost 2 Neon Tetra because I noticed my Diamondback Terrapin chasing after them so he may have gotten one of them. My Razorback Musk Turtle doesn't seem to be bothered by the fish since the cory catfish tends to go near him and clean his shell! Anyways feel free to check me out on youtube/instagram: PressureReptiles
 

birdnorth

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ill make sure to follow you on instagram. for safety reasons for the turtle and fish, I will be staying away from the terrapins. the musk turtles are most likely. how deep is the water in your hatchling tank? do you think that they would do well in a 75?
 
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ill make sure to follow you on instagram. for safety reasons for the turtle and fish, I will be staying away from the terrapins. the musk turtles are most likely. how deep is the water in your hatchling tank? do you think that they would do well in a 75?
I've got a 20 gallon high tank that will work for probably the first year in the hatchling's life. For now the water level is around 2-3 inches.
 

birdnorth

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I've got a 20 gallon high tank that will work for probably the first year in the hatchling's life. For now the water level is around 2-3 inches.
do you know if that's like the max? So I probably wouldn't be able to add a couple to an established 75?
 
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do you know if that's like the max? So I probably wouldn't be able to add a couple to an established 75?
Hey man, the bigger the tank you can get them the happier the turtles will be. I would add 3-5 inches of water max with stones and rocks so they have ways to climb and stretch so they can get air from the surface of the water. For my Razorback Musk Turtle is such no much bigger than an American Quarter, the 2-4 inches is perfect since with the substrate he can stretch his neck all the way and get air. Musk turtles are not known to bask, but I still offer basking for both my Razorback Musk and Diamondback Terrapin
 

birdnorth

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I'm sorry to bug you guys one more time and I won't be offended if you don't reply but do you think I could so a gentle slope coming down from the basking are to the bottom of a full 75? I just want there to be enough space for the fish. this would be for any musk or mud turtle hatchling, or whichever is best suited.
 
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I'm sorry to bug you guys one more time and I won't be offended if you don't reply but do you think I could so a gentle slope coming down from the basking are to the bottom of a full 75? I just want there to be enough space for the fish. this would be for any musk or mud turtle hatchling, or whichever is best suited.
yes! A slope from the bask to the bottom would be essential and rocks everywhere so it can climb and stretch his neck for air to the surface. Please post pictures whenever you're done with your setup can't wait to see it!
 

birdnorth

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hey, so I've been doing a little bit more research. I live in an apartment on the 12th floor and have started to worry that a 75 might be too heavy for the floor. I saw a frag tank that's 60 gallons with the dimentions 48 by 24 by 12. I like this because the animals have more floor space but it shouldn't be as heavy. do you think that the lack of hight would affect the animals?
 
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