Bug Spray?

peridot

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My husband usually pulls in the plants I grow for the tortoises before the bug man comes and sprays the outside of our house. Sadly, he forgot this time. The hibiscus I use for their food was in the spray zone. Does anyone know how long you have to wait for the bug spray to get out of the plants system? Will I need to wait a year?
 

Maro2Bear

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Any ideas what they sprayed and what bugs they are targeting? Just a “topical” spray on the leaves? Or a dormant oil?

Does your hibiscus drop its leaves there in NC like they do here? Or is it warm enough that they stay green all year ‘round?
 

peridot

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Any ideas what they sprayed and what bugs they are targeting? Just a “topical” spray on the leaves? Or a dormant oil?

Does your hibiscus drop its leaves there in NC like they do here? Or is it warm enough that they stay green all year ‘round?
On the recipt it says the used these products: "Bifen, Bifenthrin, Fendona" I'm not sure if that helps any. They were targeting ants, spiders, centipedes, crickets, and coackroaches. The hibiscus does stay green all year, but does periodically drop a leaf here and there. It's actually still blooming right now.
 

Maro2Bear

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Are you normally feeding the hibiscus flowers? If so, I would pull all the flowers off your plant and trash those, that way new flowers are at least “clean” in that they weren't directly sprayed. BUT, be careful & do some research on those chemicals that you listed. It’s not worth risking a poisoning for a few meals.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bifenthrin

Hhhmmmm - Bifenthrin is not at all toxic to plants. Though it does not have a large toxicological risk towards mammals or birds, bifenthrin is able to accumulate in food, so it might be dangerous to mammals or birds in some scenarios.

Also -

Bifenthrin is poorly soluble in water and often remains in soil. Its residual half-life in soil is between 7 days and 8 months, depending on the soil type, with a low mobility in most soil types. Bifenthrin has the longest known residual time in soil of insecticides currently on the market.


I think you should wait awhile.....


Fendona doesnt look too friendly either:

This product is extremely toxic to fish and aquatic inverte- brates, oysters, and shrimp. DO NOT apply when weather conditions favor drift from treated areas. Drift and runoff from treated areas may be hazardous to aquatic organisms in neighboring areas.
This product is highly toxic to bees exposed to direct treat- ment or residues on blooming crops or weeds. DO NOT apply this product or allow it to drift to blooming crops if bees are foraging in the treatment area.
 

TammyJ

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I would not use any of the plants that have been exposed to the spray, period.
If it was me, nobody would be coming with any spray into my yard anyway. I even hate it when the mosquito foggers come around the neighborhood.
No, not worth taking the risk. Just my opinion.
 

Blackdog1714

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That is why I hate the mosquito peoples. Their spray is a broad spectrum one and kills everything else in the bushes-like BEES.
 
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