Plant and flower starter.

solidsounds17

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Hey guys, just wondering if i can get some advice on some new flowers and plants I just bought for my baby leopard. I’m planning on planting these flowers outside but I’ve never really grown anything in my life before. I bought California poppy, English and African daisy, and some marigold. I was wondering what’s the best type of soil to grow them as well as general I should know.
 

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solidsounds17

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Also bought this hibiscus plant. Should I leave it in the soil And pot it came in?
 

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Kapidolo Farms

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Typically the rule of thumb is to let the plants (established, not from seed) age in their pots for about six month, so that any systemic (circulating in the vascular fluid or sitting in plant tissue) -cides can degrade. There is not any study I can refer to to endorse that period of time.

To quicken that waiting, the idea would be to re-pot the plant with 100% fresh soil that has not added stuff (fertilizers). Now the rule of thumb is one to two months.

Planting directly in the ground can quicken the process as well.

Hibiscus is a good choice. I'm too lazy right now to sort out the suitability of your other choices for their worthiness to be included into a habitat where a tortoise might get a chance to eat them.

Check out this link for vetted plants choices. . . https://tortoiseforum.org/threads/w...ry-and-garden-published-nutrient-list.161833/
 

solidsounds17

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Joined
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Location (City and/or State)
Inglewood, Ca
Typically the rule of thumb is to let the plants (established, not from seed) age in their pots for about six month, so that any systemic (circulating in the vascular fluid or sitting in plant tissue) -cides can degrade. There is not any study I can refer to to endorse that period of time.

To quicken that waiting, the idea would be to re-pot the plant with 100% fresh soil that has not added stuff (fertilizers). Now the rule of thumb is one to two months.

Planting directly in the ground can quicken the process as well.

Hibiscus is a good choice. I'm too lazy right now to sort out the suitability of your other choices for their worthiness to be included into a habitat where a tortoise might get a chance to eat them.

Check out this link for vetted plants choices. . . https://tortoiseforum.org/threads/w...ry-and-garden-published-nutrient-list.161833/
What type of soil would you recommend to use?

I was thinking of just buying a plant and letting it grow outside and plucking the flower and leaves as it grows. All the ones I've seen seem relatively too big for the closed chamber that I already have. Also, I don't think it would thrive in high humidity as well, but what do I know.
 

Lokkje

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As per Will’s post, I was growing my potted plants for my enclosure for some time before I actually got the enclosure. I put the plants with the pots into the enclosure and surrounded the pots with the Orchard Bark substrate. I grow hibiscus outside and I’m in Phoenix. If I’m capable of growing some thing it means it’s extremely easy and extremely hearty because I have the exact opposite of a green thumb sometimes. All my tortoises love the hibiscus and eat the flowers and the leaves. The enclosure is the ideal greenhouse for the plants as it is one of the enclosures that Mark builds-perfect lighting and humidity. I did grow some different grasses that I had bought from seed and I had them in pots and again just rotated the pots in and out of the enclosure so that the grass would stay fresh and there would be a variety of foods. I think it’s a great idea that you’re growing from seeds as you can control the soil and fertilizer and make sure it’s all very safe. The only thing I worry about when I forage is whether or not there’s any poisons on the foods that I forage so when I’m picking up desert weeds and cactus I go halfway up the mountain that I live against to get away from the people spraying weed killer and insecticides in my neighborhood.
 

solidsounds17

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Joined
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Location (City and/or State)
Inglewood, Ca
As per Will’s post, I was growing my potted plants for my enclosure for some time before I actually got the enclosure. I put the plants with the pots into the enclosure and surrounded the pots with the Orchard Bark substrate. I grow hibiscus outside and I’m in Phoenix. If I’m capable of growing some thing it means it’s extremely easy and extremely hearty because I have the exact opposite of a green thumb sometimes. All my tortoises love the hibiscus and eat the flowers and the leaves. The enclosure is the ideal greenhouse for the plants as it is one of the enclosures that Mark builds-perfect lighting and humidity. I did grow some different grasses that I had bought from seed and I had them in pots and again just rotated the pots in and out of the enclosure so that the grass would stay fresh and there would be a variety of foods. I think it’s a great idea that you’re growing from seeds as you can control the soil and fertilizer and make sure it’s all very safe. The only thing I worry about when I forage is whether or not there’s any poisons on the foods that I forage so when I’m picking up desert weeds and cactus I go halfway up the mountain that I live against to get away from the people spraying weed killer and insecticides in my neighborhood.
I have some pots inside with some seed mixes that’s growing perfect. I’m guessing it’s due to the high humidity and temperature? I also have a spider plant and and a Pothos in pots but I’m all out of space which is why I’m growing outside. The thing is, ive never grown flowers before some I’m hesitant on the soil and process behind it. In terms of weeds, I’m still trying to familiarize myself with the ones around my apartment before I start plucking. Not really worried about weed killer since I’ve lived here the past 10 years and I’m the only that waters the place around here. Just need to get familiar with the healthy ones to feed.
 

Kapidolo Farms

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The simple answer, that is less simple to achieve is to get soil used for organic started vegetables. Some nursery stores sell organic tomato, squash, peppers, etc, already started, So they might well also have organic soil for growing your own. Indoor grow supply places (for like growing marijuana) have all this stuff mail order - like this https://www.zenhydro.com/roots-organics-potting-soil-1-5-cu-ft-60-plt.html



What type of soil would you recommend to use?

I was thinking of just buying a plant and letting it grow outside and plucking the flower and leaves as it grows. All the ones I've seen seem relatively too big for the closed chamber that I already have. Also, I don't think it would thrive in high humidity as well, but what do I know.
 
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