Panacur dose

Kjklea08

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Hello!

My Juvenile Russian tortoise has pinworms. The vet just called and said that was the only worm they found from the fecal matter. She didn't feel it was necessary to treat him but his most recent poop was riddled with pinworms and he isn't eating as much. I feel like he needs to be dewormed, especially since I have other animals in the home and small children. What dewormer and dose should I get/give? I saw that I could get panacur online and treat at home. Thank you.
 

Yvonne G

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Since Panacur comes in different strengths it wouldn't be safe for us to give out a formula, as the formula might be wrong for the strength any reader may have on hand.
 

Kjklea08

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Since Panacur comes in different strengths it wouldn't be safe for us to give out a formula, as the formula might be wrong for the strength any reader may have on hand.

Thanks for your response. That's what I'm finding out in my research. I thought maybe they had a specific type for tortoises but they definitely don't. He is my first tortoise so I just want him to be heathy and happy. Makes me sad seeing that he isn't eating anymore. I'll probably contact my vet and ask for them to treat him.
 

ZenHerper

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It's a good thing that your vet is taking a conservative approach...reptiles are sensitive to changes to their gut flora.

But a visible load of worms is cause for treatment. Call the vet, let them know what you've found, and ask for a safe prescription.

Many deworming drugs used with reptiles have broad antibacterial activity, so do use a reptile-labelled probiotic replacement during and for two weeks after final treatment.
 

Kjklea08

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Yes this was the amount in his poop on our way to the vet yesterday. That is A LOT of pinworms to me. I understand that some is normal but this seems like too many to me.
 

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ZenHerper

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Yeah, that's too many for the immune system to overcome in a reasonably short period of time.

And they put everyone in the home at risk. (Hand washing!)
 

Kjklea08

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Yes exactly! They said that these types of pinworms shouldn't be transmittable to humans but with 3 young children I just don't want to risk it. Also with 2 dogs. During treatment should I put him in quarantine from his enclosure? I know that I will have to do a completely new substrate and clean his enclosure/statues/rocks/etc to not risk reinfection.
 

ZenHerper

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Yes exactly! They said that these types of pinworms shouldn't be transmittable to humans but with 3 young children I just don't want to risk it. Also with 2 dogs. During treatment should I put him in quarantine from his enclosure? I know that I will have to do a completely new substrate and clean his enclosure/statues/rocks/etc to not risk reinfection.
That's usually easiest. Adult animals do just fine for the short term that way.

Let us know how the appetite goes...
 

Melissacoop

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I put mine on newspaper and dewormed with panacur every two weeks for six weeks. My dog vet tested the fecal and prescribed the oral meds that I mixed with Mazuri. You can usually get the Panacur at a feed store, too.
 

JMM

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The good thing with pinworms is that you do not have to worry about tortoise pinworms infecting other animals (or humans)--they are very species specific. However, the eggs are extremely hardy. Given the load of worms in the feces, it looks like your little guy was continuously being reinfected. So cleaning the environment is crucial. Keeping your tort on newspaper (or better, a towel that is changed and laundered daily--it's a bit more cushiony and if not laid flat,the folds provide some cover) during treatment is a good idea. The enclosure can be thoroughly scrubbed several times with soap and water to loosen and remove the eggs (they are sticky). Anything that can withstand it, can be heat treated to kill the eggs--no need to find new rocks. Anything that your tort has been on (bedding, carpet, etc.) should be cleaned. Cleaning should focus on removal of eggs (shampoo carpet and furniture and launder bedding, etc.) as opposed to killing them as they are very resistant to chemicals.
 

Yvonne G

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The good thing with pinworms is that you do not have to worry about tortoise pinworms infecting other animals (or humans)--they are very species specific. However, the eggs are extremely hardy. Given the load of worms in the feces, it looks like your little guy was continuously being reinfected. So cleaning the environment is crucial. Keeping your tort on newspaper (or better, a towel that is changed and laundered daily--it's a bit more cushiony and if not laid flat,the folds provide some cover) during treatment is a good idea. The enclosure can be thoroughly scrubbed several times with soap and water to loosen and remove the eggs (they are sticky). Anything that can withstand it, can be heat treated to kill the eggs--no need to find new rocks. Anything that your tort has been on (bedding, carpet, etc.) should be cleaned. Cleaning should focus on removal of eggs (shampoo carpet and furniture and launder bedding, etc.) as opposed to killing them as they are very resistant to chemicals.
This is very informative. Thank you!
 

Kjklea08

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The good thing with pinworms is that you do not have to worry about tortoise pinworms infecting other animals (or humans)--they are very species specific. However, the eggs are extremely hardy. Given the load of worms in the feces, it looks like your little guy was continuously being reinfected. So cleaning the environment is crucial. Keeping your tort on newspaper (or better, a towel that is changed and laundered daily--it's a bit more cushiony and if not laid flat,the folds provide some cover) during treatment is a good idea. The enclosure can be thoroughly scrubbed several times with soap and water to loosen and remove the eggs (they are sticky). Anything that can withstand it, can be heat treated to kill the eggs--no need to find new rocks. Anything that your tort has been on (bedding, carpet, etc.) should be cleaned. Cleaning should focus on removal of eggs (shampoo carpet and furniture and launder bedding, etc.) as opposed to killing them as they are very resistant to chemicals.
 
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