Mazuri????

Tom

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Ok we will probably get some good conversation on this one. I just started him on it. He grazes for a few hours a day. I don't have my yard fenced in yet. So I am always out there with him. Good thing I am retired. :)
Nah... We just ignore him.

I used to say that too. Now I know better. Truth be told, no tortoise "needs" Mazuri or any other prepared food. They can survive and thrive without it completely. But its still a good supplemental food, convenient for people who live in the frozen north or in areas where seasonal food can be hard to come by, and its a great way to ensure any tortoise is getting balanced and complete nutrition. If there is any sot of trace element or mineral deficiency due to whatever "real food" they are eating, Mazuri will ensure they are getting everything they need.
 

calmingwind

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Ok bought this on Amazon from a place called Pet supply of Chicago. I have feed it to Opo 3 times. Everytime I do it I have a uncomfortable feeling. So I have decided to stop.
What do you all think?
Also cannot find the company online. View attachment 269790 View attachment 269792
I bought a 5lb bag and my boy doesn’t eat it trying to find a way so I can get it in his diet
 

Ray--Opo

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I bought a 5lb bag and my boy doesn’t eat it trying to find a way so I can get it in his diet
I started by putting 5 pellets mushed up and mixed with some grated squash. Opo weighs 7lbs. The first few times he tried to eat around it with not much luck. Today he ate everything like it wasn't there. Good luck
 

Madkins007

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A few things to understand about Mazuri- most of which you can also find on their site (https://pims.purinamills.com/BusinessLink/media/Mazuri/ProductSheet/5M21.pdf?ext=.pdf)...

1. It is recommended that you not wet or soak it. Doing so will leech out the water-soluble nutrients and increase the chances of mold.

2. Feel free to break the pellets for smaller tortoises.

3. The oils in Mazuri will go bad in a few months. You can buy time by freezing it or storing it in airtight mylar/plastic laminated bags. The big 25lb bag is designed for big torts or big collections, like at zoos. Rancid oils are really bad for birds and people, but it is probably bad for torts, too.

4. Mazuri itself has a pretty strict feeding schedule of 1-4% of the animal's body weight- which is usually a lot fewer pellets than you think.

In my research, I found a lot of feeding plans with Mazuri and other chows, and they can be broken down into about 5 groups:

100% chow- Just feed chow with maybe a little fresh food for variety. While this is Mazuri's recommendation, it is not what a lot of other reptile nutritionists suggest.

75% chow- Mostly chow and some fresh food. The fresh food offers balance and variety. Whatever nutrients may be missing in the chow should be available in the fresh portion.

50% chow- a bird vet wrote a great article about diet called the Improper Diet Cascade (my article about it here- https://sites.google.com/site/tortoiselibrary/nutrition/improper-diet-cascade. I cannot seem to locate the original online anymore.) The 50/50 diet is, in his opinion, the smartest and safest way to balance the pros and cons of chows and fresh foods.

25% chow- for people who use the chow as sort of an insurance or vitamin tablet. The idea is that chows are not as good for you, but offer difficult to provide nutrients.

0% chow- people who either have access to great food options, and/or people who distrust commercial foods for whatever reason.

I fall into the 50 to 75% range most of the time. Chows are often cheaper and offer more nutrition than what I can find in my local stores or markets, especially off-season.It is also a lot easier to grab a handful of chow and a quick salad when pressed for time.
 

Ray--Opo

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A few things to understand about Mazuri- most of which you can also find on their site (https://pims.purinamills.com/BusinessLink/media/Mazuri/ProductSheet/5M21.pdf?ext=.pdf)...

1. It is recommended that you not wet or soak it. Doing so will leech out the water-soluble nutrients and increase the chances of mold.

2. Feel free to break the pellets for smaller tortoises.

3. The oils in Mazuri will go bad in a few months. You can buy time by freezing it or storing it in airtight mylar/plastic laminated bags. The big 25lb bag is designed for big torts or big collections, like at zoos. Rancid oils are really bad for birds and people, but it is probably bad for torts, too.

4. Mazuri itself has a pretty strict feeding schedule of 1-4% of the animal's body weight- which is usually a lot fewer pellets than you think.

In my research, I found a lot of feeding plans with Mazuri and other chows, and they can be broken down into about 5 groups:

100% chow- Just feed chow with maybe a little fresh food for variety. While this is Mazuri's recommendation, it is not what a lot of other reptile nutritionists suggest.

75% chow- Mostly chow and some fresh food. The fresh food offers balance and variety. Whatever nutrients may be missing in the chow should be available in the fresh portion.

50% chow- a bird vet wrote a great article about diet called the Improper Diet Cascade (my article about it here- https://sites.google.com/site/tortoiselibrary/nutrition/improper-diet-cascade. I cannot seem to locate the original online anymore.) The 50/50 diet is, in his opinion, the smartest and safest way to balance the pros and cons of chows and fresh foods.

25% chow- for people who use the chow as sort of an insurance or vitamin tablet. The idea is that chows are not as good for you, but offer difficult to provide nutrients.

0% chow- people who either have access to great food options, and/or people who distrust commercial foods for whatever reason.

I fall into the 50 to 75% range most of the time. Chows are often cheaper and offer more nutrition than what I can find in my local stores or markets, especially off-season.It is also a lot easier to grab a handful of chow and a quick salad when pressed for time.
Thanks for the info. I had read where the oils went bad after awhile. That was one of my concerns. Other members also suggested freezing. I think I will vacuum seal and freeze. My sully is 7lbs and I feed 5 pellets twice a week. I will try breaking up with no water and mix with food. Opo won't eat it yet unless I hide it in food.
 
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