Eyes shut

Tom

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Warm side 30C
Cool side 20/25C
Basking 35/40C directly under bulb
And around 20C of a night but has been varying lately due to the warm temperature we have been having lately so we have been bathing him regularly.
All of that sounds good, and your substrate sounds fine too, but I'd get rid of the turf.

My best guess at this point is that bulb. Those should not be sold. They should be discontinued and taken off the market. They keep selling them become people keep buying them. Not every bulb causes this problem, and that has been part of the reason why this continues. Some small percentage of them burn reptile eyes, and the rest do no harm, but they also don't do much good as a UV source either. There is no way to know ahead of time which ones will burn eyes and which ones won't.
 

Mystic_Queen (Rosa)

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@Tom I have read you link about the fluorescent HO bulbs, I did not realise that they gave off UV rays. a link to any good recommendations would be helpful.
@Mystic_Queen thankyou, again a link would be much appreciated for the type of bulb you use please
Give me few mins I’ll pop link up. I also use a CHE
 

jaizei

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we use a 25w basking bulb and keep it 6/8 inches above the ground as the box suggest for the right temperature, we have a digital thermometer below it to ensure it’s at a constant temperature. Clyde tends to come out in the morning and sit directly under the light for about an hour and then will return back to his corner or have a walk around. We are swapping the bulbs out every 6months also.


What are your heights for the bulbs?
 

Mystic_Queen (Rosa)

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@Mystic_Queen amazing! Thankyou so much.

@Tom would you agree that this is a suitable bulb, just want tot get as much advise as I can.
The T5 uvb is One of. If not the best uvb option.
For heat I use a che. But like I mentioned before I have a redfoot. Not a horse field. All information of what is best will be in the Russian/horse field care sheet.
I hope your tort is ok
 

Tom

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@Mystic_Queen amazing! Thankyou so much.

@Tom would you agree that this is a suitable bulb, just want tot get as much advise as I can.
Arcadia bulbs are great. Good quality, high UV, and long lasting. At this point I would not put any UV over your tortoise for a solid month or more. They can go a long time with no UV and your tortoises eyes need time to heal. When you do eventually turn on some UV in the fall, be sure to mount the tube high enough. I high recommend the Solarmeter 6.5 UV meter so that you know exactly what is going on under your bulb. This will also save you from replacing a perfectly good bulb as the years go by.
 

mark1

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having had easily 100 turtle and tortoises in my lifetime , i have probably 40-50 right now ....... the reason i've had such a low number is they live a long time ...... last turtle i had die was killed by a raccoon a couple years ago ...... previous to that would have been one killed by a dog maybe 8-10yrs ago ........ i use to keep vials of baytril at my house ........ this statement made from my perspective is over the top ridiculous , "Now, you and the vets have created a horrid mess that this tortoise will probably not recover from.".. i'm gonna guess the first antibiotic you used was baytril the second fortaz .... a couple years ago i treated an outdoor turtle because they didn't act right , in late fall in northeast ohio , with a round of antibiotics . had them hibernate for the next 6 months outdoors within a month of the treatment ..... i've treated critically sick hatchlings with fortaz and amikacin , hatchlings that were obviously seriously ill , let alone a "healthy" adult , without adverse outcomes ...... your tortoise being healthy is assuming the only problem with him is the light ....... could be the light , may be your tortoise is sick , it's not uncommon , most captive tortoises die prematurely from disease ...... how long have you had this tortoise ? 4yrs ? did you just start using this bulb previous to your problem ? he acted better after the initial antibiotic therapy ? not uncommon in that bacterial infections are often secondary ........ often secondary to viral infections .......... i'd finish this with a just my opinion , but i don't believe i stated an opinion .......
 

Tom

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having had easily 100 turtle and tortoises in my lifetime , i have probably 40-50 right now ....... the reason i've had such a low number is they live a long time ...... last turtle i had die was killed by a raccoon a couple years ago ...... previous to that would have been one killed by a dog maybe 8-10yrs ago ........ i use to keep vials of baytril at my house ........ this statement made from my perspective is over the top ridiculous , "Now, you and the vets have created a horrid mess that this tortoise will probably not recover from.".. i'm gonna guess the first antibiotic you used was baytril the second fortaz .... a couple years ago i treated an outdoor turtle because they didn't act right , in late fall in northeast ohio , with a round of antibiotics . had them hibernate for the next 6 months outdoors within a month of the treatment ..... i've treated critically sick hatchlings with fortaz and amikacin , hatchlings that were obviously seriously ill , let alone a "healthy" adult , without adverse outcomes ...... your tortoise being healthy is assuming the only problem with him is the light ....... could be the light , may be your tortoise is sick , it's not uncommon , most captive tortoises die prematurely from disease ...... how long have you had this tortoise ? 4yrs ? did you just start using this bulb previous to your problem ? he acted better after the initial antibiotic therapy ? not uncommon in that bacterial infections are often secondary ........ often secondary to viral infections .......... i'd finish this with a just my opinion , but i don't believe i stated an opinion .......
And I find your whole premise "over the top ridiculous" based on what I've seen with 100's of cases from a half dozen tortoise vets using these meds, as well as another dozen dog/cat vets misusing these meds. Where does that leave us? Where does that leave the OP?

I was around in the old days too when all the vets were injecting Baytril into everything willy nilly. That's how I know how damaging it can be. It was fully expected by the importers that half the leopards that came in would die. The common saying was that the Baytril would either kill them or save them. Could go either way.

I don't know why you persist on promoting this old outdated way of treating reptiles. We know better now. Try to keep up, and realize that your words here may cause harm. Do you not understand that Baytril is caustic? It has a high pH. It BURNS reptile tissue at the injection site. Its like injecting bleach into their muscle.
 

mark1

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2007

Post-hibernation management of rat bite injuries in a spur-thighed tortoise (

Post-hibernation management of rat bite injuries in a spur-thighed tort...


2015
PLASTRON OSTEOTOMY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF FISHING HOOK INGESTION IN A MALAYAN BOX TURTLE (Cuora ambonensis)
http://psasir.upm.edu.my/id/eprint/48423/1/48423.pdf




2019
Population pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in clinically diseased or injured Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina), yellow-bellied sliders (Trachemys scripta scripta), and river cooters (Pseudemys concinna)

https://www.researchgate.net/profil...ina-yellow-bellied-sliders-Trachemys-scri.pdf



2018
Therapeutic management of diarrhoea in Indian star tortoises

https://www.researchgate.net/profil...ent-of-diarrhoea-in-Indian-star-tortoises.pdf


2019
Surgical management of massively large sized cloacal prolapse in an Indian star tortoise (Geochelone elegans)

https://www.researchgate.net/profil...n-Indian-star-tortoise-Geochelone-elegans.pdf

2017
A case of carapace fracture in an Indian star tortoise (Geochelone elegans)
https://www.cabi.org/ISC/FullTextPDF/2018/20183047726.pdf

2020
Epidemiological Investigation of a Mortality Event in a Translocated Gop...
Nokuse Plantation, a 22,055 ha private conservation preserve in northwest Florida, is a recipient site for gophe...






2016
RANAVIRUS EPIZOOTIC IN CAPTIVE EASTERN BOX TURTLES (TERRAPENE CAROLINA CAROLINA) WITH CONCURRENT HERPESVIRUS AND MYCOPLASMA INFECTION: MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING
https://www.researchgate.net/profil...LASMA-INFECTION-MANAGEMENT-AND-MONITORING.pdf



2017

Cutaneous lesions due to Trichosporon jirovecii in a tortoise (Testudo h...
Cutaneous mycoses have been rarely reported in Chelonians. A Testudo hermanni adult male showed a thick erosion ...
 

Gijoux

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
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Joined
May 28, 2014
Messages
403
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
2007

Post-hibernation management of rat bite injuries in a spur-thighed tortoise (
Post-hibernation management of rat bite injuries in a spur-thighed tort...

2015
PLASTRON OSTEOTOMY IN THE MANAGEMENT OF FISHING HOOK INGESTION IN A MALAYAN BOX TURTLE (Cuora ambonensis)
http://psasir.upm.edu.my/id/eprint/48423/1/48423.pdf




2019
Population pharmacokinetics of enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin in clinically diseased or injured Eastern box turtles (Terrapene carolina carolina), yellow-bellied sliders (Trachemys scripta scripta), and river cooters (Pseudemys concinna)

https://www.researchgate.net/profil...ina-yellow-bellied-sliders-Trachemys-scri.pdf



2018
Therapeutic management of diarrhoea in Indian star tortoises

https://www.researchgate.net/profil...ent-of-diarrhoea-in-Indian-star-tortoises.pdf


2019
Surgical management of massively large sized cloacal prolapse in an Indian star tortoise (Geochelone elegans)

https://www.researchgate.net/profil...n-Indian-star-tortoise-Geochelone-elegans.pdf

2017
A case of carapace fracture in an Indian star tortoise (Geochelone elegans)
https://www.cabi.org/ISC/FullTextPDF/2018/20183047726.pdf

2020
Epidemiological Investigation of a Mortality Event in a Translocated Gop...
Nokuse Plantation, a 22,055 ha private conservation preserve in northwest Florida, is a recipient site for gophe...





2016
RANAVIRUS EPIZOOTIC IN CAPTIVE EASTERN BOX TURTLES (TERRAPENE CAROLINA CAROLINA) WITH CONCURRENT HERPESVIRUS AND MYCOPLASMA INFECTION: MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING
https://www.researchgate.net/profil...LASMA-INFECTION-MANAGEMENT-AND-MONITORING.pdf



2017

Cutaneous lesions due to Trichosporon jirovecii in a tortoise (Testudo h...
Cutaneous mycoses have been rarely reported in Chelonians. A Testudo hermanni adult male showed a thick erosion ...
Just because they treat like this doesn't make it correct. There are no follow-ups to show the subsequent damage caused. Finding the cause first and correcting it is the correct way to approach an illness. If a culture was done first, as in your examples, to insure the correct antibiotic was used can be a good protocol. This is not what happens on a regular basis at most practices. Lots of guessing goes on at the animals expense.
 

mark1

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Dec 31, 2015
Messages
1,369
Location (City and/or State)
ohio
Just because they treat like this doesn't make it correct. There are no follow-ups to show the subsequent damage caused. Finding the cause first and correcting it is the correct way to approach an illness. If a culture was done first, as in your examples, to insure the correct antibiotic was used can be a good protocol. This is not what happens on a regular basis at most practices. Lots of guessing goes on at the animals expense.
i would say most vets weigh cost ..... it's not many people bring in a 30$ turtle to have a complete blood workup done , and pcr test for various viruses ......... usually they start with a good guess , the better the vet , the better the guess ..... my wife died from cancer after a 12yr battle , there is a lot of guessing going on in human medicine also ......
 
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