White line

SKOLsuper

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Can someone please tell me what this white line is around my tortoise ? Thanks E8741BBA-334F-496D-B345-ACCB24DC5EB5.png
 

Markw84

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That is new growth lines. This is what you want to see with active new growth in a healthy tortoise. As the bone beneath grows and expands, it pulls the scutes apart slowly. The thin epithelial layer covering the bone is then exposed. The white lines are the separation you are seeing. New keratin is stimulated to grow and fill in the gap within a day or two. The new keratin then gradually thickens and eventually hardens. The repeated process is what creates the ridges you see of the scute. On a sulcata this new keratin growth is much darker than the older keratin in the scute. It will lighten over the next two years to match the color of the more central part of the scute.

This is also where pyramiding can start. IF this new keratin filling in at the seam "dries" or hardens too quickly, the continued thickening of the keratin is forced downward as the upper surface becomes too rigid too fast. So the new keratin will come in lower than the adjacent scute surface. As this repeatedly occurs, valleys form between the scutes and you have pyramiding. So keeping the shell hydrated and protected during active growth is the key to preventing pyramiding.
 

Krista S

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That is new growth lines. This is what you want to see with active new growth in a healthy tortoise. As the bone beneath grows and expands, it pulls the scutes apart slowly. The thin epithelial layer covering the bone is then exposed. The white lines are the separation you are seeing. New keratin is stimulated to grow and fill in the gap within a day or two. The new keratin then gradually thickens and eventually hardens. The repeated process is what creates the ridges you see of the scute. On a sulcata this new keratin growth is much darker than the older keratin in the scute. It will lighten over the next two years to match the color of the more central part of the scute.

This is also where pyramiding can start. IF this new keratin filling in at the seam "dries" or hardens too quickly, the continued thickening of the keratin is forced downward as the upper surface becomes too rigid too fast. So the new keratin will come in lower than the adjacent scute surface. As this repeatedly occurs, valleys form between the scutes and you have pyramiding. So keeping the shell hydrated and protected during active growth is the key to preventing pyramiding.
This is the best explanation I have ever read for growth lines and new keratin growth coming in. Thank you for going into so much detail!!
 

SKOLsuper

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Messages
246
Location (City and/or State)
Essex
That is new growth lines. This is what you want to see with active new growth in a healthy tortoise. As the bone beneath grows and expands, it pulls the scutes apart slowly. The thin epithelial layer covering the bone is then exposed. The white lines are the separation you are seeing. New keratin is stimulated to grow and fill in the gap within a day or two. The new keratin then gradually thickens and eventually hardens. The repeated process is what creates the ridges you see of the scute. On a sulcata this new keratin growth is much darker than the older keratin in the scute. It will lighten over the next two years to match the color of the more central part of the scute.

This is also where pyramiding can start. IF this new keratin filling in at the seam "dries" or hardens too quickly, the continued thickening of the keratin is forced downward as the upper surface becomes too rigid too fast. So the new keratin will come in lower than the adjacent scute surface. As this repeatedly occurs, valleys form between the scutes and you have pyramiding. So keeping the shell hydrated and protected during active growth is the key to preventing pyramiding.
 

SKOLsuper

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So does this hurt him and will start going Pyramid and thanks for your lovely reply
 

SKOLsuper

Active Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2019
Messages
246
Location (City and/or State)
Essex
That is new growth lines. This is what you want to see with active new growth in a healthy tortoise. As the bone beneath grows and expands, it pulls the scutes apart slowly. The thin epithelial layer covering the bone is then exposed. The white lines are the separation you are seeing. New keratin is stimulated to grow and fill in the gap within a day or two. The new keratin then gradually thickens and eventually hardens. The repeated process is what creates the ridges you see of the scute. On a sulcata this new keratin growth is much darker than the older keratin in the scute. It will lighten over the next two years to match the color of the more central part of the scute.

This is also where pyramiding can start. IF this new keratin filling in at the seam "dries" or hardens too quickly, the continued thickening of the keratin is forced downward as the upper surface becomes too rigid too fast. So the new keratin will come in lower than the adjacent scute surface. As this repeatedly occurs, valleys form between the scutes and you have pyramiding. So keeping the shell hydrated and protected during active growth is the key to preventing pyramiding.
 

SKOLsuper

Active Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2019
Messages
246
Location (City and/or State)
Essex
That is new growth lines. This is what you want to see with active new growth in a healthy tortoise. As the bone beneath grows and expands, it pulls the scutes apart slowly. The thin epithelial layer covering the bone is then exposed. The white lines are the separation you are seeing. New keratin is stimulated to grow and fill in the gap within a day or two. The new keratin then gradually thickens and eventually hardens. The repeated process is what creates the ridges you see of the scute. On a sulcata this new keratin growth is much darker than the older keratin in the scute. It will lighten over the next two years to match the color of the more central part of the scute.

This is also where pyramiding can start. IF this new keratin filling in at the seam "dries" or hardens too quickly, the continued thickening of the keratin is forced downward as the upper surface becomes too rigid too fast. So the new keratin will come in lower than the adjacent scute surface. As this repeatedly occurs, valleys form between the scutes and you have pyramiding. So keeping the shell hydrated and protected during active growth is the key to preventing pyramiding.
 

Markw84

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5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 17, 2012
Messages
4,402
Location (City and/or State)
Sacramento, CA (Central Valley)
So does this hurt him and will start going Pyramid and thanks for your lovely reply
No. This is normal natural growth. That is how they grow. He looks great, and at his size now, he is much less susceptible to pyramiding. Once sulcatas seem to get about 10" or so, and they have been growing well, they are quite resistant to further pyramiding. Yours looks great. I was simply explaining a bit about the mechanism behind how and where it does happen.
 

SKOLsuper

Active Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2019
Messages
246
Location (City and/or State)
Essex
No. This is normal natural growth. That is how they grow. He looks great, and at his size now, he is much less susceptible to pyramiding. Once sulcatas seem to get about 10" or so, and they have been growing well, they are quite resistant to further pyramiding. Yours looks great. I was simply explaining a bit about the mechanism behind how and where it does happen.
Thanks for your advice
 
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