Rescued box turtle

Herphouse1381

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Rescued a little 3 toed box turtle. She was in bad shape. Claws were so long and malformed she could hardly walk. Her beak was partially broken so she was having trouble eating. Her shell doesn't look very healthy. I did not remove her from her natural environment, she was found by a student in the middle of the street, and taken home where she was kept in a 1 foot x 1 foot box. She is now in a large habitat with proper lighting, proper bedding, proper food. She is eating soft food, and is drinking. It is obvious someone had this little cutey as a pet because she loves to be held and talked to. It is also obvious they didn't know what they were doing. I have 2 Redearred sliders, and a red legged tortoise, so this isn't totally new to me. Box turtles are new to me. Any help and advice will be greatly appreciated.
 

johnsonnboswell

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So glad you rescued her! Please check out the care sheet, then we'll be happy to answer all your questions
 

lismar79

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Live food would prob be the easiest to get her eatting well. Worms are a favorite of my boxie. Berries and melon too. If you can get her outside a few times a week for now supervised that would be great until you get something built. Boxies do not tend to like bright light so offer a good amount of shade.
 

Herphouse1381

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Abilene, Texas
Live food would prob be the easiest to get her eatting well. Worms are a favorite of my boxie. Berries and melon too. If you can get her outside a few times a week for now supervised that would be great until you get something built. Boxies do not tend to like bright light so offer a good amount of shade.

I have her in a large aquarium for now with mulch and moss. She is eating soft food. Her beak is broken, so it is hard for her to get anything crispy in her mouth. I have a UVA UVB light above her an she seems to be really enjoying it. She stretches towards it. What kind of worms should I get for her? You know it really upsets me when someone buys a little creature like this and then neglects it. Her claws were so bad she could hardly walk. Please offer any and all advice. I really want to get her healthy. Thanks. By the way, her name is Newby. What is your boxies name?
 

johnsonnboswell

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Boxies are omnivores. You can feed protein and fruits and vegetables. Steam or cook hard food for her because of that damaged jaw. Hard boiled egg cut in half, boiled chicken, moths, worms, pill bugs, melons, berries, tomatoes.... Overripe fruit & veggies are great.

Think of a forest floor for her substrate. Make sure she can easily get in & out of her water dish. A plant saucer is good for the water dish. A pile of dead leaves is good.

Make her a secure outdoor enclosure as soon as you can. Mine love the rain and are tolerant of changeable weather. They love full sun when it's not too hot, and are very active at dawn.
 

Herphouse1381

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Abilene, Texas
Boxies are omnivores. You can feed protein and fruits and vegetables. Steam or cook hard food for her because of that damaged jaw. Hard boiled egg cut in half, boiled chicken, moths, worms, pill bugs, melons, berries, tomatoes.... Overripe fruit & veggies are great.

Think of a forest floor for her substrate. Make sure she can easily get in & out of her water dish. A plant saucer is good for the water dish. A pile of dead leaves is good.

Make her a secure outdoor enclosure as soon as you can. Mine love the rain and are tolerant of changeable weather. They love full sun when it's not too hot, and are very active at dawn.
Boxies are omnivores. You can feed protein and fruits and vegetables. Steam or cook hard food for her because of that damaged jaw. Hard boiled egg cut in half, boiled chicken, moths, worms, pill bugs, melons, berries, tomatoes.... Overripe fruit & veggies are great.

Think of a forest floor for her substrate. Make sure she can easily get in & out of her water dish. A plant saucer is good for the water dish. A pile of dead leaves is good.

Make her a secure outdoor enclosure as soon as you can. Mine love the rain and are tolerant of changeable weather. They love full sun when it's not too hot, and are very active at dawn.



Thanks for the great advise. I have been told to give her worms buried in the moss. Is this something you feed yours? What type of outdoor enclosure? What type of material? I must say she is doing better than I thought she would. When yours is inside what type of lighting do you use? I've read a lot the last couple of days about boxies, but the information is conflicting. It is nice to get info from someone who actually has one.
 

Herphouse1381

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Thanks for the great advice. I have been told to give her worms in the moss. Is this something you do? What is the best type of lighting for her indoor habitat. Right now I have a UVA UVB light and a basking light. Both are about 18 inches above her. I am confident in the care of my tortoise and Redearred sliders, but I have never had a boxie. I have read a lot the last couple of days about their care, but some of the info is conflicting. Nice to have the advice from some one who has a boxie.
 

johnsonnboswell

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I've had my oldest boxie for 39 years, and have 3 others. They're my favorites.

I put the worms in front of them. If they escape & live in the substrate, that's fine. Mine also hunt. Outdoors, the leaf pile attracts worms & bugs, breaks down to enrich the soil, provided a hide.

Mercury vapor lights are the best. They heat and light. A night time drop in temps is good.

I like well aged organic compost outdoors. Indoors I mix it with coconut coir. My outdoor pen is cinderblock.

There are others here with boxie experience, too.
 

lismar79

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I have her in a large aquarium for now with mulch and moss. She is eating soft food. Her beak is broken, so it is hard for her to get anything crispy in her mouth. I have a UVA UVB light above her an she seems to be really enjoying it. She stretches towards it. What kind of worms should I get for her? You know it really upsets me when someone buys a little creature like this and then neglects it. Her claws were so bad she could hardly walk. Please offer any and all advice. I really want to get her healthy. Thanks. By the way, her name is Newby. What is your boxies name?
Crush is my boxie. Newby is lucky to have you!
 

Herphouse1381

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Location (City and/or State)
Abilene, Texas
I've had my oldest boxie for 39 years, and have 3 others. They're my favorites.

I put the worms in front of them. If they escape & live in the substrate, that's fine. Mine also hunt. Outdoors, the leaf pile attracts worms & bugs, breaks down to enrich the soil, provided a hide.

Mercury vapor lights are the best. They heat and light. A night time drop in temps is good.

I like well aged organic compost outdoors. Indoors I mix it with coconut coir. My outdoor pen is cinderblock.

There are others here with boxie experience, too.


I appreciate your help. Wow, 39 years. I hope this little girl lives that long. I will utilize all your suggestions. I am new to this forum, but have already got lots of valuable info. Thanks again
 

lismar79

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I have one enclosure made out of cinder blocks and my box and russian torts are made out of treated lumber. I use peat moss and leaf litter ( leaves out of the yard) I also put pc of bark in there because the bugs are attracted to it and its easy to find them that way. I use earth worms, egg, cooked chicken breast, and crickens and pill bugs too. Worms and slugs would be easy for newby to eat.
 

Herphouse1381

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Crush is my boxie. Newby is lucky to have you!


Thanks, but believe me I am the lucky one. I enjoy my tortoise and turtles so much, and they provide valuable lessons for my little 7 year old granddaughter. My little Yorkie isn't ignored either. Spoiled doesn't even begin to describe my babies. (That includes mt granddaughters as well. Hope to visit with you again.
 

Herphouse1381

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Joined
May 26, 2015
Messages
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Location (City and/or State)
Abilene, Texas
I have one enclosure made out of cinder blocks and my box and russian torts are made out of treated lumber. I use peat moss and leaf litter ( leaves out of the yard) I also put pc of bark in there because the bugs are attracted to it and its easy to find them that way. I use earth worms, egg, cooked chicken breast, and crickens and pill bugs too. Worms and slugs would be easy for newby to eat.


Thanks again! The more info I get the better. I will utilize all your suggestions.
 

cmacusa3

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Great job with the rescue! I feed mine with everything that has been listed. The other day I picked some wild mulberries and my turtles eat them like crack! Good luck with the new addition.
 

MichaelaW

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Box turtles love high humidity so be sure to keep the enclosure moist. Also either provide cuttle bone or dust the food with a calcium powder supplement a few times per week. Their diet should be approximately 50% protein matter and 50% plant matter. Don't rely too heavily on fruit because they may become fixated on it and refuse other foods, so be sure to offer varied vegetables and leafy greens. If possible an outdoor enclosure is best because of the natural sunlight and weather patterns. Best of luck!
 
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