Oaxacan Mud Turtles

cdmay

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10 Year Member!
Joined
Feb 1, 2008
Messages
1,919
Location (City and/or State)
Somewhere in Florida
The Oaxacan mud turtle, Kinosternon oaxacae was only recently described (well, 1980 anyway) by Berry and Iverson based on a small group of mud turtles from Oaxaca, Mexico. They were pretty much unknown to people outside of Mexico until a few years ago when a number of adults showed up in Florida. Fortunately, some competent keepers were able to secure some of them and now a few captive hatched neonates are circulating about.
One of the guys who is very adept at breeding turtles--including 'rare' mud turtles like oaxacae, is Paul Vander Schouw known as Chelidman on some forums. Paul is a good guy and a friend and from him I was able to obtain a small group of Oaxacan mud turtle neonates.
The adult Oaxacan mud turtles that I've seen are nice looking mud turtles with cream to yellow reticulations on their heads and necks. But like most mud turtle species, their captive hatched and raised young are MUCH more attractive.
Here are some images of the little ones I'm currently raising.

30if39g.jpg


As new hatchlings their heads were sort of dark with lighter flecks of yellow. But as they have grown, their heads have become much lighter with pattern beginning to emerge.

116qdyd.jpg


zji3qp.jpg


I tried to snag some plastron shots using the method that John Cann of Australia has mastered in his fantastic books on Australian turtles. This is basically shooting up from the bottom of a bare aquarium.

9775vt.jpg

2kh3qv.jpg


It's a work in progress...

As captives these are typical mud turtles all the way. Meaning they are tough, inquisitive and highly responsive.
Unlike some other members of the mud turtle family though these haven't shown any aggression towards each other. Of course, they are still quite small but then other mud turtles will bite and snap at each other from the start of their lives.
As these grow I'll post more photos and notes...

24y1eag.jpg
 

KevinGG

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5 Year Member
Joined
Nov 16, 2013
Messages
1,121
Location (City and/or State)
Santa Cruz, CA
So beautiful. Love the little barbells too. Don’t think I have paid any attention to this species. Thanks for the headstart.
 

Moozillion

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5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
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Apr 26, 2012
Messages
10,508
Location (City and/or State)
Louisiana, USA
The Oaxacan mud turtle, Kinosternon oaxacae was only recently described (well, 1980 anyway) by Berry and Iverson based on a small group of mud turtles from Oaxaca, Mexico. They were pretty much unknown to people outside of Mexico until a few years ago when a number of adults showed up in Florida. Fortunately, some competent keepers were able to secure some of them and now a few captive hatched neonates are circulating about.
One of the guys who is very adept at breeding turtles--including 'rare' mud turtles like oaxacae, is Paul Vander Schouw known as Chelidman on some forums. Paul is a good guy and a friend and from him I was able to obtain a small group of Oaxacan mud turtle neonates.
The adult Oaxacan mud turtles that I've seen are nice looking mud turtles with cream to yellow reticulations on their heads and necks. But like most mud turtle species, their captive hatched and raised young are MUCH more attractive.
Here are some images of the little ones I'm currently raising.

30if39g.jpg


As new hatchlings their heads were sort of dark with lighter flecks of yellow. But as they have grown, their heads have become much lighter with pattern beginning to emerge.

116qdyd.jpg


zji3qp.jpg


I tried to snag some plastron shots using the method that John Cann of Australia has mastered in his fantastic books on Australian turtles. This is basically shooting up from the bottom of a bare aquarium.

9775vt.jpg

2kh3qv.jpg


It's a work in progress...

As captives these are typical mud turtles all the way. Meaning they are tough, inquisitive and highly responsive.
Unlike some other members of the mud turtle family though these haven't shown any aggression towards each other. Of course, they are still quite small but then other mud turtles will bite and snap at each other from the start of their lives.
As these grow I'll post more photos and notes...

24y1eag.jpg

:eek: O.M.G!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! How absolutely ADORABLE!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :)

...and GORGEOUS!!!!!!!!!!! :)
 

CarolM

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Joined
Oct 30, 2017
Messages
19,442
Location (City and/or State)
South Africa - Cape Town
The Oaxacan mud turtle, Kinosternon oaxacae was only recently described (well, 1980 anyway) by Berry and Iverson based on a small group of mud turtles from Oaxaca, Mexico. They were pretty much unknown to people outside of Mexico until a few years ago when a number of adults showed up in Florida. Fortunately, some competent keepers were able to secure some of them and now a few captive hatched neonates are circulating about.
One of the guys who is very adept at breeding turtles--including 'rare' mud turtles like oaxacae, is Paul Vander Schouw known as Chelidman on some forums. Paul is a good guy and a friend and from him I was able to obtain a small group of Oaxacan mud turtle neonates.
The adult Oaxacan mud turtles that I've seen are nice looking mud turtles with cream to yellow reticulations on their heads and necks. But like most mud turtle species, their captive hatched and raised young are MUCH more attractive.
Here are some images of the little ones I'm currently raising.

30if39g.jpg


As new hatchlings their heads were sort of dark with lighter flecks of yellow. But as they have grown, their heads have become much lighter with pattern beginning to emerge.

116qdyd.jpg


zji3qp.jpg


I tried to snag some plastron shots using the method that John Cann of Australia has mastered in his fantastic books on Australian turtles. This is basically shooting up from the bottom of a bare aquarium.

9775vt.jpg

2kh3qv.jpg


It's a work in progress...

As captives these are typical mud turtles all the way. Meaning they are tough, inquisitive and highly responsive.
Unlike some other members of the mud turtle family though these haven't shown any aggression towards each other. Of course, they are still quite small but then other mud turtles will bite and snap at each other from the start of their lives.
As these grow I'll post more photos and notes...

24y1eag.jpg
Love your pictures. Any updates?
 

CarolM

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Joined
Oct 30, 2017
Messages
19,442
Location (City and/or State)
South Africa - Cape Town
Don’t have any updated images. The group is now over at a fellow keepers home for growing up in her ‘turtle barn’ where they are in Waterland tubs. But I know that they have been growing well.
Thanks for letting us know. Would have loved to see updated pics. They are beautiful turtles.
 
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