Skelly

Member
Joined
May 17, 2020
Messages
33
Location (City and/or State)
Kildare, Ireland
Hi everyone, I’m going to be bringing home my first tortoise very soon, it’s a Herman and Iv been spending a lot of time trying to make sure I know everything I need to know and to make sure iv the perfect set up iv bought a 2ft wooden vivarium that will be upgraded once my tort gets bigger and for lighting iv bought the Arcadia ACU15 ultra seal controller 14-15w with an Arcadia euro range 10 percent D3+ desert reptile light and also an exo Terra aluminum dome with an exo Terra PT2136 intense basking spot light I’m hoping iv made the right decisions with this and also from researching iv come to understand that coco coir is the best substrate but some torts may eat it now I know that the person I’m getting it from has them on wood chip bedding so I’m wondering should I stick to that or change to coco coir and also iv read multiple things about hibernation but some say because it will be living inside that it won’t need to go into hibernation is this true? thanks to anyone that can give me some advice
 

Steviemonty

New Member
Joined
Apr 9, 2020
Messages
25
Location (City and/or State)
Norwich uk
Hi everyone, I’m going to be bringing home my first tortoise very soon, it’s a Herman and Iv been spending a lot of time trying to make sure I know everything I need to know and to make sure iv the perfect set up iv bought a 2ft wooden vivarium that will be upgraded once my tort gets bigger and for lighting iv bought the Arcadia ACU15 ultra seal controller 14-15w with an Arcadia euro range 10 percent D3+ desert reptile light and also an exo Terra aluminum dome with an exo Terra PT2136 intense basking spot light I’m hoping iv made the right decisions with this and also from researching iv come to understand that coco coir is the best substrate but some torts may eat it now I know that the person I’m getting it from has them on wood chip bedding so I’m wondering should I stick to that or change to coco coir and also iv read multiple things about hibernation but some say because it will be living inside that it won’t need to go into hibernation is this true? thanks to anyone that can give me some advice
Hello and welcome.there are plenty of members here with some great advice ..sounds like your doing ok ...but as I say iam no expert myself yet as I have only just recently joined.but I've had good experience here .so your in good hands...good luck
 

franklin444

Member
Joined
May 6, 2020
Messages
79
Location (City and/or State)
U.S.A
I would recommend coconut coir substrate. I don't hibernate my tortoise because he lives inside and I don't breed him or plan on it. So in conclusion you will not need to hibernate your tortoise. Your tortoise may get a Little bit less active in the winter but not that much less active. Have fun tortoise keeping!
 

Skelly

Member
Joined
May 17, 2020
Messages
33
Location (City and/or State)
Kildare, Ireland
I would recommend coconut coir substrate. I don't hibernate my tortoise because he lives inside and I don't breed him or plan on it. So in conclusion you will not need to hibernate your tortoise. Your tortoise may get a Little bit less active in the winter but not that much less active. Have fun tortoise keeping!
Could you recommend anywhere to buy the coconut coir substrate, iv seen a lot of reviews on amazon saying there were mites in it when they received it or even a specific brand of it ?
 

GBtortoises

Well-Known Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Feb 27, 2009
Messages
3,622
Location (City and/or State)
The Catskill Mountains of New York State
I would not recommend using coconut coir as a substrate. Coconut coir consists of shredded and ground fibers. If allowed to become too dry it becomes very dusty and easily inhaled and consumed internally by tortoises. It sticks to anything moist including a tortoise's food, eyes, mouth and nostrils. In order to prevent that from happening you have to keep it well saturated with water to the point where it's too wet. Coconut coir can be mixed with an organic soil that might pack harder than desired to keep it loosened up some but at no more than 25% coir to 75% soil.
You don't mention the how old or how big the Eastern Hermann's is that you are getting. If it is a baby or small tortoise (under 8.5cm) a soil based substrate works best. Bagged organic potting, topsoil or other organic soil kept at a depth of about 5-7.5cm works very well. Soil substrates do not dry out as easily, especially when misted daily. They also provide good, solid footing required for proper leg muscle development in small growing tortoises. Yet it is soft enough that a tortoise can burrow down into it, a habit that many baby tortoises will do to keep safe and maintain body hydration and temperature. It is also easily spot cleaned as needed. I've raised hundreds of baby Mediterranean tortoises on organic soil over the years with absolutely no issues.
For subadult and adult size Hermann's and similar species a wood based substrate works well. This is usually found as some form of a bark mulch. Here in the U.S. many keepers use cypress bark mulch. After many years of trying different substrates I've found cypress bark mulch to work the best. With daily misting it will retain moisture fairly well, it is resistant to mold and fungus if it is not kept too wet. It is somewhat solid once compacted by the tortoise but also allows for burrowing into.
Stay away from shavings altogether. Such as pine or cedar shaving that are usually advertised for use with small animals such as hamsters. Shavings are far too dry and dusty and actually contain toxins in their composition.
 
TortoiseSupply.com

New Posts

Top