humidity?

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steve426

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I know this has probably been covered somewhere on here but it is probably easier for me to ask than spend hours searching. What is a good level of humidity for my 2 year old sulcata? He already has some pyramiding that he came with when i got him and i really want to do everything i can to keep it from getting worse. Currently the humidity level in his tortoise table averages about 54%. I think that is pretty good considering it is winter and is very dry outside. Come June the humidity will be 90 - 100% all the time. I just want o know if a level in the 50% range is to low and will affect him in the long run as far as pyramiding is concerned.

Thanks
Steve
 

Fernando

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This is from TOM's Thread re: Humidity

Tom said:
Pyramiding prevention: This is all new stuff. You won't see it on an internet care sheet. It is my opinion and the product of 20 years of utter failure and tons of research, observation and trial and error. Lot's of other people helped me to reach these findings, so its not just me. Here is how to grow a smooth, healthy sulcata: Keep them humid, hydrated, warm and spray their shells 3-4 times a day. Yes they are desert animals, but the babies stay hidden in burrows, root balls and leaf litter, where it is HUMID. Babies don't just walk around out in the open in the hot dry air in the wild. They'd get eaten if they did. Once they get to around 6-8" humidity and moisture is much less critical. It is important to get them sunshine, exercise and a good diet too, but hydration, humidity, and moisture is the KEY to preventing pyramiding. Soak them in shallow, warm water at least once a day. I soak them first thing in the morning and again after a sunning session in the hot, dry air here. Sometimes, I'll soak them a third time before lights out. Sulcatas are very resistant to shell rot and fungus. I have never seen a single case of shell rot on a sulcata. As long as they are kept warm (75 or warmer) they will not get respiratory infections either. I have tried to keep one too wet and could not induce any sort of problem. You don't have to go crazy, but do keep them well hydrated. Pyramiding has nothing to do with excess protein or too much food. It has everything to do with MOISTURE, HUMIDITY and HYDRATION.


These things are MY opinion and are based on MY experiences with sulcatas and other torts over the last 20 years. My way is not the only way and other people have also raised smooth sulcatas, but it is very rare and can usually be traced back to high levels of humidity and or hydration. Much of this can also be applied to other species, but as of now, sulcatas are the only one that I have kept THIS wet.
I believe people have suggested 70%-80%...someone correct me if I'm wrong.
 

Tom

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At that age, the wetter you keep it the smoother the new growth will be. Just do NOT let it get a chill while its in all that moisture. I shoot for 80 around the clock with a 12-13 hour basking spot around 100.
 
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