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Human interaction, taming a newbie, or leave well alone?

Discussion in 'Aldabra tortoises' started by TortyDxb, Jan 9, 2018.

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  1. TortyDxb

    TortyDxb Active Member

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    In contrast to Sulcata's (as mentioned here a few times) the young Aldabras in our care are much more timid.

    Once we approach them for a bath, or a move to pastures new, you hear the rush of air as their heads pop into their shells. Once placing them down anywhere, they scurry as fast as possible away. Kinda like a cockroach actually.

    Do you think interaction is worth while? I feel they have got very very slightly better, where they do eventually come out of their shells, or don't run so far away. They used to run to wall then go vertical and land on their backs, meaning we'd have to interact again, the poor things.

    I'd love to interact more with them (not sure on what level) but I tend to hide and observe - to get any viewing time of them actually doing things.

    Any thoughts, is it just leave alone and make no inroads?

    Worth noting: I don't think they are as scared as the seem, or that stressed- b/c they will quickly settle and eat something after their scurry away at (actually) quite a fast speed :) for a tortoise...
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  2. Sesel

    Sesel Well-Known Member

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    I think it is up to the keeper. Of course interaction will help them become less timid.
    I feel the handling before and after soaking & moving them indoors/outdoors helps.

    The exported/imported ones may be more timid due to the lack of handling.

    My mature male will try to 'ram' and bite anyone who enters the enclosure. Not sure if this is a result of no interaction. :rolleyes:
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
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  3. TortyDxb

    TortyDxb Active Member

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    A961FE46-278B-4EB0-B777-4CDA124B4ACE.jpeg

    Thanks sesel,

    I agree that over time they probably will understand that the handling for, say, a bath is safe.

    They seem to be getting a little less freaked out Day by Day. Sometimes it’s back to square one, and reading @Alaskamike threads makes you realize this could be a few years of skittish behavior.

    I love the rediculous cockiness of hatchling sulcatas :) from a size perspective it looks so funny the way they charge about without a care in the world !!
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
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  4. TortyDxb

    TortyDxb Active Member

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    Actually sesel, of course the more we handle them the more they are going to get used to it, and calm down.

    I don't think its just a matter of waiting for them to become friendly, it's totally logical that if you held them for an hour a day, they would yield eventually and start to be 'ok' with it.

    Exactly the same with a horse, and many other animals actually. It is just a time issue- as in do you/me/anyone have the time to put into it.

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