Extra/Split scutes ALWAYS girls?

Shaif

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Hi Tort Besties!

In your experience, have you come across actual male torts with split/extra scutes?

I see that most people feel scute "imperfections" are caused by higher temps and the conditions favor females.

I'm wondering if my Baby Zeus is a Zeus-etta? Is this something reliable?
 

Tom

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This is a generality. There are males with split scutes too, but it is pretty rare. I have male leopard with split scutes.
 

Yvonne G

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No, not that dependable. I have a leopard with aberrant scutes that's looking more male every day.
 

Markw84

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I too have a male star with aberrant scutes. I personally believe higher temps at a different time in the incubation sets the scute pattern vs the sex determination. So you could see a spike in temperatures in an incubator at perhaps 40% -50% through incubation, but the temps go back down to a more "normal range" the rest of the time and the sex determination goes the male route. I think the reason it is normally females is a higher temperature is used throughout the incubation period. I don't believe someone would purposefully incubate at higher temperatures, then lower 1/2 way through. Again - this is my theory, not fact!!
 

tortadise

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I also have a male leopard now that has an extra/split scute. Have also had numerous other leopards with split scutes. This goes for any species really. Too cool of temperatures along with too hot of temperatures during the proper time of incubation and formation of
The scutes has everything to do with it. Typically during the 3rd stage of
Embryonic development. This is when the embrio/tiny turtle or tortoise is developed and shelled. They're around 60-70% completely
Developed. Only takes a short while. Typically it occurs also in lengthier incubating species. artificially incubated that being said.
 

tortadise

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This happens quite often in sea turtles quite often. Also Manouria. Which both have soft shelled eggs. Too much moisture and heat waves or cool spells can affect the development quick easily.
 

allegraf

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I have a male adult redfoot with split scute. Seems like it is not limited to the girls.
 

Shaif

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Yes. It looks like this may be a normal variant in both males and females. I love the uniqueness-- male or female.

Thanks for the responses!
 
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