Wild Caught Yellow-Foot Tortoise

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MeganAlyse

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Not at all. I heard red-foots are more personable, but I picked a yellow-foot because of the environment I had already got set up. I need to do some research on indoor enclosures for red-foots, but i think it'll be fine.
 

-EJ

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I've never seen a wild caught Colombian that was even slightly pyramided.

How do you 'know' it is a colombian RF... let alone farm raised?

EricIvins said:
It is a "Farm Raised" Colombian Redfoot - I'd venture to say 50-60% come in like that........Colombians are very prone to being lumpy, and that is a trait right out of the wild.......Some are bred and hatched at the Farm, others are collected as hatchlings and raised untill the 4" ( legal ) mark......I see anywhere between 200-400 at a time when they do come in, and the majority are lumpy and bumpy........It isn't diet or anything environmental either......Some will smooth out somewhat, others just get worse with time.......


AND just because a Tortoise has yellow legs doesn't make it a Yellowfoot.........
[hr]
It's probably not wild caught.

It probably is a Redfoot but a clear photo of the head would make it relatively easy to tell.
 

cdmay

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EJ wrote:
I've never seen a wild caught Colombian that was even slightly pyramided.
How do you 'know' it is a colombian RF... let alone farm raised?



EricIvins is right. That looks like one of the hundreds of 'farm raised' Colombian red foots that have been imported in the past few years. Almost all of them have at least some pyramiding even though the wild caught animals are smooth.
The size, head and leg color, carapace color and pyramiding is absolutely typical of the animals that are coming in now from at least two Colombian outfits. Plus, it seems that whatever diet or care that the farmed animals are being given contributes to them being a bit lumpy. That is why some of us who have a seen a lot of these imports recently are fairly confident in saying what they are.
That pyramiding will lessen as the animal grows if it is given the proper care.
 

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What'd I miss? It is not wild caught.

Carl... is it a RF... and... why?

Second question... if they are being raised in their native habitat... even with the most horrid diet... they would not look like that.

One of us is missing something.

cdmay said:
EJ wrote:
I've never seen a wild caught Colombian that was even slightly pyramided.
How do you 'know' it is a colombian RF... let alone farm raised?



EricIvins is right. That looks like one of the hundreds of 'farm raised' Colombian red foots that have been imported in the past few years. Almost all of them have at least some pyramiding even though the wild caught animals are smooth.
The size, head and leg color, carapace color and pyramiding is absolutely typical of the animals that are coming in now from at least two Colombian outfits. Plus, it seems that whatever diet or care that the farmed animals are being given contributes to them being a bit lumpy. That is why some of us who have a seen a lot of these imports recently are fairly confident in saying what they are.
That pyramiding will lessen as the animal grows if it is given the proper care.
 

EricIvins

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-EJ said:
I've never seen a wild caught Colombian that was even slightly pyramided.

How do you 'know' it is a colombian RF... let alone farm raised?

EricIvins said:
It is a "Farm Raised" Colombian Redfoot - I'd venture to say 50-60% come in like that........Colombians are very prone to being lumpy, and that is a trait right out of the wild.......Some are bred and hatched at the Farm, others are collected as hatchlings and raised untill the 4" ( legal ) mark......I see anywhere between 200-400 at a time when they do come in, and the majority are lumpy and bumpy........It isn't diet or anything environmental either......Some will smooth out somewhat, others just get worse with time.......


AND just because a Tortoise has yellow legs doesn't make it a Yellowfoot.........
[hr]
It's probably not wild caught.

It probably is a Redfoot but a clear photo of the head would make it relatively easy to tell.
Because I know the supply chain.......Starting from Colombia......There is only really one operation that deals with Redfoots.......

It is Farm Raised - The picture above is of a "Farm Raised" 4" Colombian direct from Colombia.......It is lumpy, and they are kept and raised the same way a wild Colombian Redfoot would......It isn't diet, nor environmental........I would think it's more of a genetic tendency.......

As stated above, the "Farm" does have some of it's own production, but they do get wild hatchlings and juvies to raise to the 4" legal size.....
 

-EJ

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cool... than I can hopefully give an update next month... we are talking the farm in Brazil.

How long have you been doing this... Importing/exporting...?

You really didn't answer my questions.

EricIvins said:
-EJ said:
I've never seen a wild caught Colombian that was even slightly pyramided.

How do you 'know' it is a colombian RF... let alone farm raised?

EricIvins said:
It is a "Farm Raised" Colombian Redfoot - I'd venture to say 50-60% come in like that........Colombians are very prone to being lumpy, and that is a trait right out of the wild.......Some are bred and hatched at the Farm, others are collected as hatchlings and raised untill the 4" ( legal ) mark......I see anywhere between 200-400 at a time when they do come in, and the majority are lumpy and bumpy........It isn't diet or anything environmental either......Some will smooth out somewhat, others just get worse with time.......


AND just because a Tortoise has yellow legs doesn't make it a Yellowfoot.........
[hr]
It's probably not wild caught.

It probably is a Redfoot but a clear photo of the head would make it relatively easy to tell.
Because I know the supply chain.......Starting from Colombia......There is only really one operation that deals with Redfoots.......

It is Farm Raised - The picture above is of a "Farm Raised" 4" Colombian direct from Colombia.......It is lumpy, and they are kept and raised the same way a wild Colombian Redfoot would......It isn't diet, nor environmental........I would think it's more of a genetic tendency.......

As stated above, the "Farm" does have some of it's own production, but they do get wild hatchlings and juvies to raise to the 4" legal size.....
 

MeganAlyse

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Wait... Is my tortoise sick? I'm not following you all. Pyramiding is bad, I know that, but what makes you think she is pyramiding? And how is she "lumpy"? I thought the scrutes on the back were supposed to be slightly dome-shaped.
 

-EJ

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Pyramiding is not bad... it is unappealing to people due to the anal retentive tortoises keeper.

Your tortoise is great looking healthwise.

No... the scutes should be flat.

MeganAlyse said:
Wait... Is my tortoise sick? I'm not following you all. Pyramiding is bad, I know that, but what makes you think she is pyramiding? And how is she "lumpy"? I thought the scrutes on the back were supposed to be slightly dome-shaped.
 

-EJ

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What happens from here on out... in your hands. It is young... healthy...

MeganAlyse said:
Does it mean anything in regards to her care?
 

EricIvins

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-EJ said:
cool... than I can hopefully give an update next month... we are talking the farm in Brazil.

How long have you been doing this... Importing/exporting...?

You really didn't answer my questions.

EricIvins said:
-EJ said:
I've never seen a wild caught Colombian that was even slightly pyramided.

How do you 'know' it is a colombian RF... let alone farm raised?

EricIvins said:
It is a "Farm Raised" Colombian Redfoot - I'd venture to say 50-60% come in like that........Colombians are very prone to being lumpy, and that is a trait right out of the wild.......Some are bred and hatched at the Farm, others are collected as hatchlings and raised untill the 4" ( legal ) mark......I see anywhere between 200-400 at a time when they do come in, and the majority are lumpy and bumpy........It isn't diet or anything environmental either......Some will smooth out somewhat, others just get worse with time.......


AND just because a Tortoise has yellow legs doesn't make it a Yellowfoot.........
[hr]
It's probably not wild caught.

It probably is a Redfoot but a clear photo of the head would make it relatively easy to tell.
Because I know the supply chain.......Starting from Colombia......There is only really one operation that deals with Redfoots.......

It is Farm Raised - The picture above is of a "Farm Raised" 4" Colombian direct from Colombia.......It is lumpy, and they are kept and raised the same way a wild Colombian Redfoot would......It isn't diet, nor environmental........I would think it's more of a genetic tendency.......

As stated above, the "Farm" does have some of it's own production, but they do get wild hatchlings and juvies to raise to the 4" legal size.....
Good luck with Brazil.......I know a Brazilian over here with connections, but still can't get them to send Redfoots over here.......The American Dollar isn't strong enough for them to consider it.......

What did I not answer?
 

HLogic

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EJ and company,

I concur with Eric and Carl. I have 4 no-red redfoots from the source to which Eric & Carl allude. I also have the CITES docs from their import. They are from the foothills of the Sierra Nevada de Santa Marta in Colombia from a 'farming' operation whose web domain has now expired. The four of mine are slightly pyramided and have only yellow & white coloration (pics below). I believe the pyramiding is environmental as the adults they show are not - probably the same issues we encounter with regard to diet/humidity/misting.



 

Yvonne G

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Hi Megan:

Don't worry about your little tortoise. Its a fine-looking specimen. Just follow the care sheets and give it the best care you can. You and the tortoise will be just fine.
 

-EJ

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I got to thank you for pushing me into this trip...(personal problem)

Read back through the posts... still unanswered.

I'll leave it at that.

EricIvins said:
-EJ said:
cool... than I can hopefully give an update next month... we are talking the farm in Brazil.

How long have you been doing this... Importing/exporting...?

You really didn't answer my questions.

EricIvins said:
-EJ said:
I've never seen a wild caught Colombian that was even slightly pyramided.

How do you 'know' it is a colombian RF... let alone farm raised?

EricIvins said:
It is a "Farm Raised" Colombian Redfoot - I'd venture to say 50-60% come in like that........Colombians are very prone to being lumpy, and that is a trait right out of the wild.......Some are bred and hatched at the Farm, others are collected as hatchlings and raised untill the 4" ( legal ) mark......I see anywhere between 200-400 at a time when they do come in, and the majority are lumpy and bumpy........It isn't diet or anything environmental either......Some will smooth out somewhat, others just get worse with time.......


AND just because a Tortoise has yellow legs doesn't make it a Yellowfoot.........
[hr]
It's probably not wild caught.

It probably is a Redfoot but a clear photo of the head would make it relatively easy to tell.
Because I know the supply chain.......Starting from Colombia......There is only really one operation that deals with Redfoots.......

It is Farm Raised - The picture above is of a "Farm Raised" 4" Colombian direct from Colombia.......It is lumpy, and they are kept and raised the same way a wild Colombian Redfoot would......It isn't diet, nor environmental........I would think it's more of a genetic tendency.......

As stated above, the "Farm" does have some of it's own production, but they do get wild hatchlings and juvies to raise to the 4" legal size.....
Good luck with Brazil.......I know a Brazilian over here with connections, but still can't get them to send Redfoots over here.......The American Dollar isn't strong enough for them to consider it.......

What did I not answer?
 

MeganAlyse

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When she first got here, she was eating everything. Now she won't touch the food I offer her. Am I doing something wrong?
 

Yvonne G

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Have you changed what you are offering?

Be sure the temperature is correct in the habitat. They won't eat if they can't warm up.
 

MeganAlyse

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basking spot is about 86 and the cold end is around 74[hr]
I had a 150 watt bulb for basking, but it got to 100, so I exchanged it for a 75 watt.
 

HLogic

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Megan, 100 is fine for basking as long as the cooler end is in the low to mid 80's. You said it was eating well yesterday. Maybe it's stuffed! RF's are not known for hunger strikes. Give it a day or two...

EJ, I assume the "is it a RF" question has been answered by the photos posted. If it is the question, "How do you 'know' it is a colombian RF... let alone farm raised?", obviously, without documentation it is not "known" but the animal's characteristics match those of many others recently imported - so at best it is still an assumption. The only other 'anerythristics' I have seen (and I certainly don't see all) were from Panama and it was a rather limited import, only a handful several years ago and a single specimen originating from Barbados also a few years back.

The slight pyramiding is likely due to lack of a moist environment for use as a refugium. The photos on the now defunct web site showed the majority of the enclosure was bare (and dry) dirt with shaded areas for refuge. I have seen nearly the same degree of pyramiding in the farm-raised torts from Venezuela which is why I am of the opinion it is environmental - I have seen neither wild Vzln nor Clbn specimens (except some from the Maracaibo basin) that showed any degree of pyramiding.

With regard to the the "importing/exporting" question, I'll defer to Eric...

If there is another question yet unanswered, please be kind enough to point us of similar but differing "trips" to it specifically.

And, EJ... pre-congrats on your 1000th post!
 

-EJ

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I really don't care... but for the others who keep redfoots and yellowfoots... can you clarify what you just said?

The ID of the RF has not been answered without a clear photo of the head.

Then you agree... origin is unknown.





HLogic said:
EJ, I assume the "is it a RF" question has been answered by the photos posted. If it is the question, "How do you 'know' it is a colombian RF... let alone farm raised?", obviously, without documentation it is not "known" but the animal's characteristics match those of many others recently imported - so at best it is still an assumption. The only other 'anerythristics' I have seen (and I certainly don't see all) were from Panama and it was a rather limited import, only a handful several years ago and a single specimen originating from Barbados also a few years back.

The slight pyramiding is likely due to lack of a moist environment for use as a refugium. The photos on the now defunct web site showed the majority of the enclosure was bare (and dry) dirt with shaded areas for refuge. I have seen nearly the same degree of pyramiding in the farm-raised torts from Venezuela which is why I am of the opinion it is environmental - I have seen neither wild Vzln nor Clbn specimens (except some from the Maracaibo basin) that showed any degree of pyramiding.

With regard to the the "importing/exporting" question, I'll defer to Eric...

If there is another question yet unanswered, please be kind enough to point us of similar but differing "trips" to it specifically.

And, EJ... pre-congrats on your 1000th post!
 
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