White poop

RoxyA

Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2021
Messages
37
Location (City and/or State)
Fort Scott
Urates is fine and normal think of it as wee and waste. Reading your post 35 you seem to have it all correct what is the concern? With regular soaks and good hydration it will go more milky. Keep a weight log and monitor growth weekly.
I was just concerned about feeding him too many of the wrong greens, if any of those are too high in oxylates for him to have daily. I know about the spinach and kale but wasn't sure about the others. Also if I'm giving him too much calcium, if that was the problem. I've just been warned so much about diet, urates, etc I want to make sure it's right. Thanks so much for the help
 

ZenHerper

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Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
1,687
Location (City and/or State)
New Jersey
I was just concerned about feeding him too many of the wrong greens, if any of those are too high in oxylates for him to have daily. I know about the spinach and kale but wasn't sure about the others. Also if I'm giving him too much calcium, if that was the problem. I've just been warned so much about diet, urates, etc I want to make sure it's right. Thanks so much for the help
Oxalates have nothing to do with urates. Oxalates can, at high concentrations, bind to calcium - preventing the body from using calcium for many purposes. Oxalates can, at high concentrations, damage the kidneys.

Urates (and most bladder stones) are made out of a protein metabolite (uric acid) plus a metal (usually sodium, potassium, calcium). Dehydrated tortoises pass more urates, and more gritty and solid urates. Too little water in the diet combined with too much protein plus too much calcium (or potassium or sodium - but keepers seldom supplement those) in the diet can lead to solid urates and bladder stones.

The medical tl;dr about urates:

Sulcata are grass eating tortoises. But the one grass way too high in protein for this species is Alfalfa. Never feed alfalfa grass or hay.

Other feeding and care information here:

Correction of bodily functions does not happen overnight - it can take a long time for urates to disappear and for urine to become mostly clear.
 

RoxyA

Member
Joined
Jun 16, 2021
Messages
37
Location (City and/or State)
Fort Scott
Oxalates have nothing to do with urates. Oxalates can, at high concentrations, bind to calcium - preventing the body from using calcium for many purposes. Oxalates can, at high concentrations, damage the kidneys.

Urates (and most bladder stones) are made out of a protein metabolite (uric acid) plus a metal (usually sodium, potassium, calcium). Dehydrated tortoises pass more urates, and more gritty and solid urates. Too little water in the diet combined with too much protein plus too much calcium (or potassium or sodium - but keepers seldom supplement those) in the diet can lead to solid urates and bladder stones.

The medical tl;dr about urates:

Sulcata are grass eating tortoises. But the one grass way too high in protein for this species is Alfalfa. Never feed alfalfa grass or hay.

Other feeding and care information here:

Correction of bodily functions does not happen overnight - it can take a long time for urates to disappear and for urine to become mostly clear.
Ok maybe I just need to give it some time then, thank you
 
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