West Coast Florida - Yellow Foot or Red Foot?

jwr0201

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Jun 4, 2021
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Location (City and/or State)
Sarasota, FL
I'm looking to get a single tortoise and eventually would like to have a small breeding group. Before getting the tort, I think the first thing is to determine the species that will do best in our sub tropical climate here on the West Florida coast. Another question may be salt tolerance. I am near the water and wonder if the salt air is a consideration - ? Please offer suggestions. Other than Red Foot or Yellow Foot, are there any other species that I may keep in an outdoor enclosure year round?
Apologies if this subject has been beaten to death.
RR
 

KarenSoCal

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Low desert 50 mi SE of Palm Springs CA
Aldabras are kept south of you in the Naples vicinity by ALDABRAMAN, a member here. He's not on TFO much, but he has a group on FB called Tortoise Talk.

I'm also pretty certain that Galapagos torts could be kept there outside year round.

Of course, any torts need secure heated areas for night and rainy cold days.
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
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Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
I'm looking to get a single tortoise and eventually would like to have a small breeding group. Before getting the tort, I think the first thing is to determine the species that will do best in our sub tropical climate here on the West Florida coast. Another question may be salt tolerance. I am near the water and wonder if the salt air is a consideration - ? Please offer suggestions. Other than Red Foot or Yellow Foot, are there any other species that I may keep in an outdoor enclosure year round?
Apologies if this subject has been beaten to death.
RR
You could also look into the Indotestudo. I love them but my climate is wrong for them. Your climate is ideal for them.
 

TeamZissou

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Albuquerque, NM
Redfoot are widely available in FL and you might even be able to find a free one. I've always thought yellowfoot are neat, but they don't seem to be as popular as redfoot. I guess they can be a little less outgoing.

You should also consider radiated tortoises. They are said to have great personalities. You are also in the unique position that you can easily purchase one in FL, which cannot be said for all states since they are protected under the Endangered Species Act law which largely prohibits interstate sales. There are a few breeders in FL that have some truly stunning high yellow radiated.
 

ZEROPILOT

REDFOOT WRANGLER
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South Eastern Florida (U.S.A.)/Rock Hill S.C.
Redfoot
I keep my group outdoors here on the east coast of south Florids.
The climate is ideal for all but a few days a year.
I'm 11 miles inland.
Salt is not an issue.
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
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Southern California
Would Leopard Tortoise do well here in a warm, humid climate outdoors?
Regular leopards would be questionable. Many people keep them in FL just fine, but other people have had problems with the humidity and rain. SA leopards would do fine there. One of the main breeders from years ago was in FL and he had no trouble with them there. The problem is that I only know of two sources for properly started, healthy SA leopards: Me and @Rodriguez Chelonians . All other breeders that I've seen either don't start them right, or are selling mixes. They will tell you otherwise, but its obvious. Buyer beware.

If you want to try regular leopards:
1. ONLY but from someone who starts them correctly. Mostly indoors in a warm humid closed chamber, daily soaks, and introduction to a wide range of "natural" foods. Do not buy a dry started one that has been outside all day in a dry climate.
2. Keep it mostly inside until it gets some size on it.
3. When its time to move it outdoors, make sure is has a properly built, sealed and insulated, thermostatically controlled, dry shelter to retreat to and make sure it sleeps in it every night, all year long. This will also protect it at night for all the local insects, rodents, and predators in your part of the world.

We can help you with all of these points.
 
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