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Updated Photos of Toothless, Jet

marty4dive

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Hello. been awhile since I posted; just wanted to get Toothless, Jett photos uploaded; they're about 5 now; Toothless is about 45 lbs and Jett is about 39 lbs or so. Very healthy, though Jett continues to defer to Toothless when bellying up to the Smorgasboard!IMG_0369.JPGIMG_0369.JPG IMG_0369.JPG
 

marty4dive

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Vallejo, CA
Still triyin to bend iCloud to my will! OK these pics are of Toothless, Jett; Jett is the more pyramided on; hey, happened before I got her/him. Still, a mild to moderate case. Toothless was raised in Arizona and squirted a few times over 4 years. Pretty good for way low humidity. I'm sure he'll be smooth at 10-15 years. Jett will be somewhat like Yvonne's So&Bo(Bo&So) even though she/he has had adequate Ca++; taken today 10/23/14
 

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marty4dive

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5 Year Member
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Aug 20, 2013
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Vallejo, CA
~ He looks happy!
Yes that was Toothless in the forefront; always makes sure he gets his due! One thing I was hoping Aldabraman could shed light on recently occurred to me and not sure if it's valid: reptiles in general do not seek out or much appreciated human contact; this is true across most species that I'm familiar with. Even amongst tortoises I haven't found any that really appreciated handling or touching. Sulcatas will sometimes tolerate human touch but don't crave it. Aldabra tortoises however, are in complete Nirvana when having their head and neck scratched, caressed. Are there other reptile examples of this? It's fascinating to me that this species of tortoise indulges in receiving human interaction this way and begs the question where is the evolutionary payoff for such behavior? This of course is one reason I love me some Aldabras; no other tortoise species I've had does this. Any takers? Marty4dive
 

Twiggz

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Jun 19, 2013
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Beautiful torts. You give me hope that I can raise a smooth Aldabra in ca.

As for reptiles that seek human interaction, the iguana is the only other one I've heard of. My father had one when he was a kid that was hand raised from a baby. It would crawl onto his shoulder when ever he sat down and make popping sounds in his ear as he pet it. That was before I was born. His second iguana was the polar opposite. mean old bastard. For the record, when they hit you with their tail it freakin hurts.
 

marty4dive

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5 Year Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2013
Messages
48
Location (City and/or State)
Vallejo, CA
Beautiful torts. You give me hope that I can raise a smooth Aldabra in ca.

As for reptiles that seek human interaction, the iguana is the only other one I've heard of. My father had one when he was a kid that was hand raised from a baby. It would crawl onto his shoulder when ever he sat down and make popping sounds in his ear as he pet it. That was before I was born. His second iguana was the polar opposite. mean old bastard. For the record, when they hit you with their tail it freakin hurts.
Thank you for the compliments re: Toothless and Jett. I've caught many Iguanas in various places, i.e. Mexico, Bonaire; one of them in Bonaire managed to get a tail whip across my face before I could control it. I'm not sure Iguanas actually seek out attention from humans as much as they simply tolerate it or perhaps associate humans with food. With Aldabras there is a definate interaction that happens that says " oh please dont stop patting my shell and rubbing my neck" thing going on; they will allow their neck to be scratched, rubbed until their human gets tired. It has nothing to do with aquiring food and seems tp serve some purpose. It may be that, as on the islands, they are allowing parasites to be removed(birds do this for them there); Aldabras and other large tortoises are prone to tick infestations. This is just a theory on my part but there has to be some evolutionary payoff for the behavior to have become ingrained. The more I think about it the more I'm convinced that the tortoises are simply allowing their humans to delouse them. Any other takers out there?
 

Alaskamike

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Thank you for the compliments re: Toothless and Jett. I've caught many Iguanas in various places, i.e. Mexico, Bonaire; one of them in Bonaire managed to get a tail whip across my face before I could control it. I'm not sure Iguanas actually seek out attention from humans as much as they simply tolerate it or perhaps associate humans with food. With Aldabras there is a definate interaction that happens that says " oh please dont stop patting my shell and rubbing my neck" thing going on; they will allow their neck to be scratched, rubbed until their human gets tired. It has nothing to do with aquiring food and seems tp serve some purpose. It may be that, as on the islands, they are allowing parasites to be removed(birds do this for them there); Aldabras and other large tortoises are prone to tick infestations. This is just a theory on my part but there has to be some evolutionary payoff for the behavior to have become ingrained. The more I think about it the more I'm convinced that the tortoises are simply allowing their humans to delouse them. Any other takers out there?
You are probably right. My little 10 mo old aldabra Cupcake , stood all the way up first time I sprayed him. Though he was ( and still is ) people shy, he let me rub his back legs, then front as long as I stayed behind him and didn't make any fast moves. I didn't teach him this, I believe he responded with some kind of genetic imprint. You are right , in their natural environment they stand to be cleaned of bugs and parasites ( symbiotic relationship)

This could have been going on for 100ds of 1000ds of years. Evolution at work :)
 

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