Update on no eyes

LRZtorts

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Dec 23, 2015
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101
Well he is now officially 1 month old. I still don't have a name for this little guy yet, but he seems to be doing okay. I was hoping he would be slightly larger by now, but he has definitely grown and put on some weight. IMG_0419.JPG IMG_0420.JPG This is a comparison of him and his clutch mate. Hatched same day few hours apart, but there is a major size difference. IMG_0421.JPG
 

sibi

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That's great that he's eating. Of course there's gonna be a weight difference. One has eyes to see his food, the other has to follow his nose. I think he's so special. :)
 

edwardbo

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Good for you , nurturing that special little guy . May I add that in my experience when a baby has issue there is almost never a time that it is singular ,what I'm saying is he may have a slight constriction in the esoughagus or a slightly cleft palette .however , maybe as we've seen posted on here many times he is just smaller or a slower grower than sibling . Thanks for the update, if he's made it this far he'll probably keep wanting to live . Best of luck ,what name has been bestowed on him ?
 
M

Maggie Cummings

Guest
Just a suggestion from someone with blind experience. Cut his food into mouth sized pieces, or at least a lot smaller than what I see. Then pile it into a corner.
But he'll eat more and gain some size. Feed his mate in a different place so the blind guy has no competition. Make it a good salad. Kale, romaine, dandelions, grape leafs, endive, radicchio, there's such a list you can feed him. If you cut them smaller and add all kinds of different smells (kale is strong smelling)so is radicchio strong smelling and tasting. Stuff like that helps. I operate a small special needs tortoise and turtle rescue, have a couple of blind ones now, grown to adults. But if he were mine, that's how I would feed him. It has proven to be quite helpful in feeding blind animals......good luck.
 

LRZtorts

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Joined
Dec 23, 2015
Messages
101
Just a suggestion from someone with blind experience. Cut his food into mouth sized pieces, or at least a lot smaller than what I see. Then pile it into a corner.
But he'll eat more and gain some size. Feed his mate in a different place so the blind guy has no competition. Make it a good salad. Kale, romaine, dandelions, grape leafs, endive, radicchio, there's such a list you can feed him. If you cut them smaller and add all kinds of different smells (kale is strong smelling)so is radicchio strong smelling and tasting. Stuff like that helps. I operate a small special needs tortoise and turtle rescue, have a couple of blind ones now, grown to adults. But if he were mine, that's how I would feed him. It has proven to be quite helpful in feeding blind animals......good luck.
Thanks for the advice. I have been feeding a variety and placing him in the center but I never thought of really small pieces and sticking them in a corner. I'll be testing that out this weekend.
 

MPRC

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Does he have a name yet?
 

Mojavejaz

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Feb 8, 2017
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I had a little leopard tort hatch with no eyes - named him Stevie-Ray, but he didn't make it past a couple months unfortunately
 
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