Top Tortoises in Trouble...

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gummybearpoop

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I didn't know there was an updated TFTSG list in 2007. I always referred to the 2003 red list. I only listed tortoises and I may have accidentally left some out since I am doing this while on my lunch break.

http://www.iucn-tftsg.org/trouble/

Turtles in Trouble: The World’s Top 25 Most Endangered Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles - 2007
(arranged in estimated hierarchical order).

1 Chelonoidis (=Geochelone) nigra abingdonii
5 Geochelone platynota
9 Astrochelys (=Geochelone) yniphora
13 Testudo kleinmanni
14 Pyxis planicauda
22 Psammobates geometricus
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• Though Chelonoidis (=Geochelone) nigra abingdonii is represented by only a single individual living in captivity (Lonesome George) and could be considered functionally Extinct, recent work in the Galápagos has demonstrated the presence of mixed abingdonii genotypes in some tortoises from the Volcan Wolf area of Isabela, raising hope that a compatible mate might eventually be located and the taxon possibly saved.

————————————-

• 2007 Regional Lists: Using the data reviewed in 2007 to determine the Global Top 25 List presented above, the TFTSG also compiled Regional Top Threatened Lists to provide rough hierarchical rankings of the currently most threatened species of tortoises and freshwater turtles for various geographic regions. These lists are documented here. The species on these lists also included on the list of the Top 25 globally threatened species are indicated in bold type.
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Turtles in Trouble: Africa’s Most Endangered Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles - 2007
1 Astrochelys (=Geochelone) yniphora
2 Pyxis planicauda
4 Psammobates geometricus
5 Homopus signatus cafer
8 Centrochelys (=Geochelone) sulcata
9 Astrochelys (=Geochelone) radiata
11 Pyxis arachnoides
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Turtles in Trouble: Asia’s Most Endangered Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles - 2007
4 Geochelone platynota
17 Manouria emys
24 Indotestudo forstenii
38 Indotestudo elongata
————————————–

Turtles in Trouble: The Mediterranean Region’s Most Endangered Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles - 2007
1 Testudo kleinmanni
3 Testudo graeca nikolskii
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Turtles in Trouble: MesoAmerica’s Most Endangered Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles - 2007
3 Gopherus flavomarginatus
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Turtles in Trouble: North America’s Most Endangered Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles - 2007
7 Gopherus agassizii
11 Gopherus polyphemus
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Turtles in Trouble: South America’s Most Endangered Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles - 2007
1 Chelonoidis (=Geochelone) nigra abingdonii
7 Chelonoidis (=Geochelone) nigra hoodensis
8 Chelonoidis (=Geochelone) nigra duncanensis
9 Chelonoidis (=Geochelone) nigra darwini
10 Chelonoidis (=Geochelone) nigra porteri
11 Chelonoidis (=Geochelone) nigra vicina




IUCN redlist ( I just posted the tortoises)
http://www.iucn-tftsg.org/red-list/

2008 IUCN Red List for Testudines

EX = Extinct; EW = Extinct in the Wild; CR = Critically Endangered; EN = Endangered; VU = Vulnerable; LR/nt = Lower Risk/Near Threatened; LR/lc = Lower Risk/Least Concern; LR/cd = Lower Risk/Conservation Dependent; DD = Data Deficient

Detailed information regarding current IUCN Categories and Criteria (ver. 3.1) are available via this link (redlistcatsenglish.pdf).

The following list and further detailed information about each listed species can also be obtained via the IUCN Red List website.
————————————-
Taxon (English Common Name) and IUCN Threat Status plus IUCN Threat Criteria
—————————————————-

Astrochelys radiata (Radiated Tortoise)
Status: Critically Endangered A4d;E

Astrochelys yniphora (Ploughshare Tortoise)
Status: Critically Endangered A4ad;B2ab(v);C1;E

Geochelone chilensis (Southern Wood Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A1cd

Geochelone denticulata (South American Yellow-footed Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A1cd+2cd

Geochelone elegans
Status: Lower Risk/least concern

Geochelone gigantea (Aldabra Giant Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable D2

Geochelone nigra (Galapagos Giant Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A2c, B1+2c

Geochelone nigra ssp. abingdoni (Abingdon Island Tortoise)
Status: Extinct in the Wild

Geochelone nigra ssp. becki (Volcan Wolf Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable D1+2

Geochelone nigra ssp. chathamensis (Chatham Island Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable D1+2

Geochelone nigra ssp. darwini (James Island Tortoise)
Status: Endangered C2a

Geochelone nigra ssp. duncanensis (Duncan Island Tortoise)
Status: Extinct in the Wild

Geochelone nigra ssp. galapagoensis (Charles Island Tortoise)
Status: Extinct

Geochelone nigra ssp. guntheri (Sierra Negra Tortoise)
Status: Endangered C2a

Geochelone nigra ssp. hoodensis (Hood Island Tortoise)
Status: Critically Endangered D

Geochelone nigra ssp. microphyes (Volcan Darwin Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable D1+2

Geochelone nigra ssp. porteri (Indefatigable Island Tortoise)
Status: Endangered C2a

Geochelone nigra ssp. vandenburghi (Volcan Alcedo Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable D2

Geochelone nigra ssp. vicina (Iguana Cove Tortoise)
Status: Endangered C2a

Geochelone platynota (Burmese Starred Tortoise)
Status: Critically Endangered A1cd+2cd, C2a

Geochelone sulcata (African Spurred Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A1cd

Gopherus agassizii (Desert Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A1acde+2cde, E

Gopherus berlandieri (Berlandier’s Tortoise)
Status: Lower Risk/least concern

Gopherus flavomarginatus (Yellow-bordered Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A1cd

Gopherus polyphemus (Gopher Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A1acde
: Lower Risk/near threatened

Homopus bergeri (Berger’s Cape Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable C2a

Homopus signatus (Speckled Cape Tortoise)
Status: Lower Risk/near threatened

Indotestudo elongata (Yellow-headed Tortoise)
Status: Endangered A1cd+2cd

Indotestudo forstenii (Travancore Tortoise)
Status: Endangered A1cd+2cd

Indotestudo travancorica
Status: Vulnerable A1cd

Kinixys erosa (Serrated Hinge-backed Tortoise)
Status: Data Deficient

Kinixys homeana (Home’s Hinged-backed Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A2cd

Kinixys natalensis (Natal Hinge-backed Tortoise)
Status: Lower Risk/near threatened

Manouria emys (Burmese Mountain Tortoise)
Status: Endangered A1cd+2cd

Manouria impressa (Impressed Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A1acd, B1+2acd

Psammobates geometricus (Geometric Tortoise)
Status: Endangered A1ac, B1+2c

Pyxis arachnoides (Spider Tortoise)
Status: Critically Endangered A4cd;E

Pyxis planicauda (Flat-tailed Tortoise)
Status: Critically Endangered A4acd

Testudo graeca (Spur-thighed Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A1cd

Testudo graeca ssp. nikolskii
Status: Critically Endangered A1abcde+2bcde

Testudo hermanni (Hermann’s Tortoise)
Status: Lower Risk/near threatened

Testudo hermanni ssp. hermanni (Western Hermann’s Tortoise)
Status: Endangered B1+2abcde

Testudo horsfieldii (Central Asian Tortoise)
Status: Vulnerable A2d

Testudo kleinmanni (Kleinmann’s Tortoise)
Status: Critically Endangered A2abcd+3d

Testudo marginata (Marginated Tortoise)
Status: Lower Risk/least concern

Testudo werneri (Negev Tortoise)
Status: Critically Endangered A2abcde+3de
 

Yvonne G

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I found it very interesting that the Sulcata is "in trouble" in Africa. We see the glut of them here in the pet trade and I just have to change my tune now. Thank goodness for those private breeders!

Yvonne
 

gummybearpoop

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emysemys said:
I found it very interesting that the Sulcata is "in trouble" in Africa. We see the glut of them here in the pet trade and I just have to change my tune now. Thank goodness for those private breeders!

Yvonne


Before I saw the list, I read in a book about african tortoises that sulcatas are critically endangered. It is hard to believe that, especially living in the southwestern states, where I can get sulcatas for free.
Sulcata breeders will help ensure that this species doesn't go extinct....well, at least in captivity. I wonder if if c.b. sulcatas will ever be reintroduced to an area where they are extinct.

I wouldn't mind keeping sulcatas, but I just don't want to surrender the space to keep them. A pair of sulcatas or a plethora of medium sized tortoises...... I picked the medium sized tortoises.

I believe tortoises are one of those animals species that will continue to become rarer and rarer in the wild.

When keeping tortoises, I believe captive breeding programs are very important to consider.
 

Laura

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There are more Tigers in captivity then in the wild.. Breeding them in captivity will not save the ones in the wild. There is not enough Wild left to save them there. To many people, bad education.. same as in Africa...
 

Yvonne G

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Laura said:
There are more Tigers in captivity then in the wild.. Breeding them in captivity will not save the ones in the wild. There is not enough Wild left to save them there. To many people, bad education.. same as in Africa...

Speaking of tigers...aren't you just amazed at the footage of those Monks in whatever land it is, who keep wild tigers? As I was watching the program I kept expecting to see someone get attacked by a tiger, but they just peacefully co exist.

Yvonne
 

gummybearpoop

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Laura said:
There are more Tigers in captivity then in the wild.. Breeding them in captivity will not save the ones in the wild. There is not enough Wild left to save them there. To many people, bad education.. same as in Africa...

Captive breeding doesn't directly save the animals in the wild, but it does give the option of reintroduction of animals back into the wild and also help decrease the demand for wild-caught animals.

There were only 7 Arabian Oryxs left in the world. They were brought to the Phoenix Zoo, bred in captivity, and now I believe hundreds have been reintroduced to the wild. Captive breeding can give an option of reintroduction should extinction come across a species path. There are many species that have had a second chance because of captive breeding. I wish it never got to that point that captive breeding is necessary to prevent extinction, but we are humans....and we do as we do....we do as we please.

In addition, sulcatas were $1000 each and were rarely seen in the early 80s. I believe there were around 10-15 individuals in the early 80s. Captive breeding has made it possible to supply the pet trade without any importation of wild caught animals. The pet trade takes a toll on animal population. Captive breeding can help relieve the demand for wild-caught animals. Captive breeding has not directly saved the wild sulcatas, but captive breeding has helped deter the desire for illegal smuggling of sulcatas....which indirectly has saved some of the wild sulcatas.

Some of the tortoises that have been recently imported in mass numbers may not become available again on a mass scale such as the pancakes, hinge-backs, indian stars, russians, redfoots/yellowfoots, etc. When these imports come in, it is important that we should establish health, genetically-diverse breeding groups.

Tortoises make "cool" pets, but I believe conservation in any manner should be considered by everyone. Private collections can contribute to the conservation of animals. There are zoos that are going to private individuals in seek of genetically-diverse animals. Some of these animals may become part of a "release back into the wild" program.

emysemys said:
Laura said:
There are more Tigers in captivity then in the wild.. Breeding them in captivity will not save the ones in the wild. There is not enough Wild left to save them there. To many people, bad education.. same as in Africa...

Speaking of tigers...aren't you just amazed at the footage of those Monks in whatever land it is, who keep wild tigers? As I was watching the program I kept expecting to see someone get attacked by a tiger, but they just peacefully co exist.

Yvonne

I didn't see that....that sounds very interesting
 

chairman

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It is sad to see so many torts on this list. Really makes me want to step up for plans for putting together a breeding colony of my Home's Hingebacks.
 

Sunrise

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"In addition, sulcatas were $1000 each and were rarely seen in the early 80s. I believe there were around 10-15 individuals in the early 80s. Captive breeding has made it possible to supply the pet trade without any importation of wild caught animals. The pet trade takes a toll on animal population. Captive breeding can help relieve the demand for wild-caught animals. Captive breeding has not directly saved the wild sulcatas, but captive breeding has helped deter the desire for illegal smuggling of sulcatas....which indirectly has saved some of the wild sulcatas."

wonder if aldabra will be priced $80 in the next 20 years? just like sulcata $1000 1980s, and now only $80s.
 

gummybearpoop

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Sunrise said:
wonder if aldabra will be priced $80 in the next 20 years? just like sulcata $1000 1980s, and now only $80s.

That would be tough to say. Sulcatas produce large clutches than most tortoises...probably because their is a high egg/hatchling death rate in africa. Aldabras have small clutches of eggs and also I believe that not many people are breeding Aldabras on a regular basis. It also takes longer for an Aldabra to reach breeding size.

Not many people can feed/house an Aldabra tortoise easily either.

But you never know......
 

egyptiandan

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They aren't listed Mark because the IUCN hasn't recognised either of them yet. I believe the DNA work wasn't convincing enough and the fact that A. hololissa (the found ones) didn't match (DNA wise) the ones in collections.

Danny
 
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