Spur thigh not eating

AngieD

New Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Messages
12
Location (City and/or State)
London
Hi all, I am in need of some advice. My 11-year-old spur thigh has come out of hibernation as planned and although he's always been a picky eater, he is worrying me by eating very frugally if at all. I have booked an appointment with the reptile specialist vet locally, but I wondered if anyone here has any tips on getting him eating properly again. He has done this before and a vitamin jab from the vet usually gets him going, but I would prefer a natural solution if there is one as the needle is so big and it looks so painful for him... any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance...
 

Blackdog1714

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2018
Messages
1,867
Location (City and/or State)
Richmond, VA
What are
1. Temps- Warm Side/Cold SIde/Basking
2. Humidity Level
3. UVB source
4. Substrate
5. Size Of Enclosure
Photos would greatly help
 

TammyJ

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
2,871
Location (City and/or State)
Jamaica
Yes, please provide us with the information and some pictures so we can best help you!
 

AngieD

New Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Messages
12
Location (City and/or State)
London
OK, just so you know, I am UK based (South East) and Cyril spends most of his Summer outside during the day and only in his tort table overnight (to protect from foxes). At this time of year, fresh out of hibernation he has free range of an area of the house, that is around 4m x 4m with a basking area and a hide. The lamp is a Neorep Reptiglobe 80w UVB self ballasted mercury lamp. His basking temps are around 27 - 32 degrees C (depending on the time of day and the rest of the area ranges between 15 - 20 degrees C. His substrate is Komodo tortoise substrate. His substrate is sprayed daily to maintain humidity and he is bathed daily for around 30 mins (or as long as he is happy to stay in). As I said, this is not a new thing, he has always been a tricky eater, but I am just looking for more natural remedies than an annual jab from the vet. I recently had his brother here (temp overwintering without hibernation) living in the same area and conditions, who was a breeze, ate loads, gained weight and left here in fine fettle. It made me realise just how difficult Cyril is, hence the reach out to you guys. I will take some photos later today if I get a chance. But hopefully all tat will give you an idea? Thanks in advance...
 

Raymo2477

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Oct 18, 2011
Messages
638
Location (City and/or State)
Eastern, PA, USA
What have you offered? I find my torts are attracted to red food so possibly try some radiccho.
 

AngieD

New Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Messages
12
Location (City and/or State)
London
So far offered everything he usually likes from dandelions to pellets and everything in-between... he's booked into the vets now so I think I will have to just hope the jab works!
Thanks for the advice though.
 

TammyJ

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
2,871
Location (City and/or State)
Jamaica
Please let us know what the "jab" consists of, for our own elucidation, and because we are concerned and would like to see the progress of your pet.
 

AngieD

New Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Messages
12
Location (City and/or State)
London
Please let us know what the "jab" consists of, for our own elucidation, and because we are concerned and would like to see the progress of your pet.
He has had the jab previously (he did the same thing the first year I got him). From what the reptile vet tells me, it's a multivitamin type jab that get's his system going properly and stimulates his appetite. It did work last time, I was just hoping for a more natural solution. I will let you know how he gets on though. Thank you all.
 

AngieD

New Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Messages
12
Location (City and/or State)
London
I just wanted to let all of you, who are interested, know, that after having a broad spectrum vitamin jab and a few days of soaks with 'repti boost' powder in the water - he is now back and eating well. The vet said he was actually a little fat having just come out of hibernation, so I guess the main reason for not eating was simply that he didn't need to. I would rather be slightly neurotic about it that blase, so I am still glad I got him checked out - thank you to all of you who tried to advise.
 

New Posts

Top