Soft shell and won’t open eyes

Toddrickfl1

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Any other advice?
Keep it warm, at least 80 degrees. Try putting the turtle in front of some food after soaking it. Strawberries, melon, earthworms, mealworms, are all some good foods you can try. Everything should be explained in that video.
 

Cory02

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Keep it warm, at least 80 degrees. Try putting the turtle in front of some food after soaking it. Strawberries, melon, earthworms, mealworms, are all some good foods you can try. Everything should be explained in that video.
Thank you he is already moving more he is currently soaking. You guys are amazing.
 

Yvonne G

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This solution to closed eyes is tailor made for baby box turtles:


You'll find it posted at the top of the "Frequently Asked Questions" section here on the Forum.
 

Yvonne G

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Because of their small size, baby box turtles dehydrate very quickly. So they need to be kept in a warm humid environment. The half water, half land suggestion from a previous post in this thread is a good one. I don't do that, but I do keep my baby box turtle enclosures pretty wet with lots of shade. This is a picture of a large plastic tub that I sectioned off with plywood because I had three different size babies in there:

christmas tree bin 2-8-21 a.jpg christmas tree bin 2-8-21 b.jpg christmas tree bin 2-8-21 c.jpg
 

TaylorTortoise

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And do you suggest I put him in warmer water or colder water so he can hydrate?
Always warm water but not too hot. test it out for yourself to see how it feels.
Soak him for about 30 minutes.
and Have this soak available in his tank unless you do half the enclosure shallow water, and the other half rocks (of coursemake sure he can not digest these rocks that they are bigger than his head.)
 

TaylorTortoise

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And again I’m a first time turtle owner. I did research before I bought it but just haven’t gotten the correct time to really really take care of it. I appreciate your help
Hatchlings and tortoises turtles in general need a lot of care. If you feel like you can't commit 100% I would return him, or give him to someone else who can devote their time 100% to the turtle so he can have a strong long healthy life.
 

m irwin

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I agree - looks like a baby box turtle, either Three Toed or Eastern. And note if so, it is a turtle and not a tortoise. Semantics aside, it's important because you may end up reading a tortoise care sheet and try feeding it all plant based foods rather than what it really needs. And if it is a baby box turtle, then it needs protein over anything else. Worms are a good start but it's hard to eat when you're dried out like it is.

Regardless, that set up you have it in is woefully in-adequate. Baby box turtles instinctually hide so for them that means lots of burrowing into leaf litter and/or under things. They need to feel protected and sheltered. That carpeted thing on the tank bottom is not cutting it. They need moisture & humidity to do well. I agree with previous reply that he/she looks very dried out. Soak it in water water for a while - like 30 minutes or so. Replace water as it cools off with warm. Or put it into a stopped up sink and slowly drip warmer water in so the temp stays consistent. That should wake it up a bit. Then get your tank up to par. If your going to care for it properly, this is what it takes. It'll also need a heat source and UV rays. Note that babies are more difficult to care for than adults. They are more sensitive to their environment and need better care in that an adult can handle "life" better then a baby (just like all babies in nature I presume) - know what you're getting yourself into before you go down this road as providing it proper care will cost $$ and time.

I hope this helps. Ask questions - like you are - and honestly assess whether or not you can and are prepared to give it the care it needs. If not, give it to someone who can. Not trying to preach - only trying to educate as you want it to survive and thrive. Just take a look at Craigslist and you'll see deformed box turtles for sale who were no doubt loved by their owners but given terrible care and are now deformed and living in a 20 gallon box. Not a great life. Good luck!
 

Jackiethetortoise

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There is an electrolyte solution you can buy for him. Soak him in that, it’ll help. He’s totally dehydrated and the shell getting soft is due to dehydration and poor lighting. He’s on the brink, so please hurry!
 

Obbie

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Yes here’s a picture. And thank you for your help so far. And when I feed him he loves the worms and I can’t identify what kind of tortoise he is I’m gonna be honest I forgot what kind he is when after the lady had told me. I feel terrible for this right now View attachment 317928 View attachment 317929
I’m no expert, but I think that may be a musk turtle ?
 

Hutsie B

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That is a baby box turtle. It needs moisture and you can try strawberries and cantelope and follow the directions in the care sheet. Baby Box turtles need a more moist environment than adults do, but yours looks dry. You can get some eye medicine from your vet that might be gently rubbed on his eyes to medicate the eyes and help get them open if the soaking doesn't help. He can eat earthworms too. Just a few suggestions off the top of my head.
 

jeff kushner

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You got this now Cory.....you've been given the best advice....couldn't have gotten that from a Vet.

The media pretends all land turtles are dry-loving tortoises so it's no surprise we keep seeing this, not your fault brother.

Just change your habitat mindset from "desert" to more of "swampy-bog" with a warm spot.....I use a heating pad under one part but recently added a none light emitting- Infrared Ceramic Heat bulb in one corner and we have been finding her on the edges of it's range or directly under, warming up. Keep in mind that reptiles need heat to digest food and 80F is not high enough.


and he or she will love you!

fwiw; be careful with a heating bulb, it get's nearly 500F on the bottom......for the bulbs I BOUGHT, 10-12" above the bottom, no cover on the enclosure is a good place to start. Careful of covers & glass sides since they trap heat and you'll cook her/him! You can always move closer as req but you can't undo "dead".

Because you now think "swamp" Cory and have heat, be ready to add 6-8 oz of H20 every day. Depending on the habitat of course but it will dry up in two days.....you have to keep it a bog"-ish"

Good luck, you're in great hands!

jeff

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