Second Successful hatching of Chersina Angulata - Sterantino CAWG

Sterant

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Mar 6, 2016
Messages
551
Location (City and/or State)
Albany, NY
Hi all,
I am very happy to announce that I have hatched a second Chersina angulata in the US and have 4 fertile, developing eggs that should hatch over the next 4 months. My incubation strategy was largely the same as the first one.
The egg was placed in a closed Tupperware container buried in the same dirt the female nested in. I kept the humidity in the container at 100% for the full term of incubation. I set the container on a high shelf in my tortoise room so it was exposed to the same daily temperature swing as the room and the adult tortoises. 87F during the day and drops to 70F at night.
At 90 days of incubation, I brush the dirt off the top of the egg and I did sand the top of the egg just a bit with some 150 grit paper. I mist the egg every couple days with water to keep the humidity up.
First egg hatched at 135 days, this one hatched at 124. I am using this same method for the other four developing eggs and they all seem to be doing well. I will let you know when they hatch.

second.jpg second 1.jpg second 2.jpg second 3.jpg
second.jpg second 1.jpg second 2.jpg second 3.jpg

Dan
 

turtlesteve

Active Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2012
Messages
188
Dan, this is fantastic! Congratulations! So as I understand it, you did not diapause these eggs? And from talking to others I am hearing that maybe they do need a diapause sometimes?

I assume the CAWG has plans for these little guys but I definitely want to be on the waiting list...
 

Sterant

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Mar 6, 2016
Messages
551
Location (City and/or State)
Albany, NY
Dan, this is fantastic! Congratulations! So as I understand it, you did not diapause these eggs? And from talking to others I am hearing that maybe they do need a diapause sometimes?

I assume the CAWG has plans for these little guys but I definitely want to be on the waiting list...
Steve - Thanks for the kind words. I don't do an initial diapause, no. It seems that the 17 degree night drops are enough. I have studied this species in great detail (and still don't know much ;-) and there is no clear method to the natural development of eggs that would dictate any particular diapause timeframe. In my experience, the night drop is a contributor to incubation success. The night drops, RH and the high/low temperatures I use are chosen based off temperature/RH readings taken in-situ in South Africa, in an area with natural nests - where we buried temperature and humidity sensors next to an actual nest site. @CarolM was the field agent doing all of the sensor work in South Africa.
I will keep you on my list of those interested in babies when available!
 

turtlesteve

Active Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2012
Messages
188
Steve - Thanks for the kind words. I don't do an initial diapause, no. It seems that the 17 degree night drops are enough. I have studied this species in great detail (and still don't know much ;-) and there is no clear method to the natural development of eggs that would dictate any particular diapause timeframe. In my experience, the night drop is a contributor to incubation success. The night drops, RH and the high/low temperatures I use are chosen based off temperature/RH readings taken in-situ in South Africa, in an area with natural nests - where we buried temperature and humidity sensors next to an actual nest site. @CarolM was the field agent doing all of the sensor work in South Africa.
I will keep you on my list of those interested in babies when available!
Very interesting..... My first thought is that they overlap in range with PP leopard tortoises, which are difficult to incubate but supposedly do need a diapause. So much we still don’t understand...
 

Sterant

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Mar 6, 2016
Messages
551
Location (City and/or State)
Albany, NY
Very interesting..... My first thought is that they overlap in range with PP leopard tortoises, which are difficult to incubate but supposedly do need a diapause. So much we still don’t understand...
I was having that same conversation with @Tom yesterday. Agreed we have a lot to learn / discover!
 

Chubbs the tegu

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 9, 2019
Messages
2,577
Location (City and/or State)
Ma
High Five Dan!!!

You set out to do it, and you are doing it. Amazing work.



But would it be the original version from years ago, or the current version? Does she come with a mute button for when politics come up?
Mute button= duct tape
 

zovick

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Nov 17, 2013
Messages
558
Hi all,
I am very happy to announce that I have hatched a second Chersina angulata in the US and have 4 fertile, developing eggs that should hatch over the next 4 months. My incubation strategy was largely the same as the first one.
The egg was placed in a closed Tupperware container buried in the same dirt the female nested in. I kept the humidity in the container at 100% for the full term of incubation. I set the container on a high shelf in my tortoise room so it was exposed to the same daily temperature swing as the room and the adult tortoises. 87F during the day and drops to 70F at night.
At 90 days of incubation, I brush the dirt off the top of the egg and I did sand the top of the egg just a bit with some 150 grit paper. I mist the egg every couple days with water to keep the humidity up.
First egg hatched at 135 days, this one hatched at 124. I am using this same method for the other four developing eggs and they all seem to be doing well. I will let you know when they hatch.

View attachment 293927 View attachment 293928 View attachment 293929 View attachment 293930
View attachment 293927 View attachment 293928 View attachment 293929 View attachment 293930

Dan
Excellent work, Dan. Congratulations on a difficult job well done.

Bill
 
Top