ReptiChip/coco coir combo outside?

Joined
May 13, 2021
Messages
39
Location (City and/or State)
Las Vegas, NV
This is the ReptiBark
This is the coco coir
After prepping my outdoor area for Beans I've been thinking about how I can get some clean fill dirt in his enclosure... but it would be a lot of labor to move that amount of dirt on my own and I would also have to purchase a wheelbarrow and something to put it in for transport and rent a truck. Very unfortunate that all my friends that have those sorts of resources either don't have them anymore or have moved away and aren't currently in town LOL

So I'm considering a mixture of either ReptiBark/coco coir or Reptibark/topsoil because I think the price would be equal to the price of tools to move the dirt + hours in labor as a weak small baby (me) but also it seems that fir based orchid bark is not available in my area in bulk.

I live in Las Vegas so I'm quite concerned about being able to maintain the level of humidity for him as it's very dry and hot here. The dirt here is also very dry... He has been enjoying burrowing into the more humid ReptiBark that I set up for him temporarily, but he also has some injuries so I'm worried about him getting too messy in another substrate.

Dirt would be the ideal choice, but I'm just weighing my options because I don't already have the tools to move the dirt on hand so it would actually probably be equal if not more to try and get the dirt. Aside from the price (where dirt would typically be cheaper if you already had the resources to move it) is dirt particularly better than other substrates for an outdoor enclosure or would these be okay or is there anything else preferable that would be better for a Russian tortoise?
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
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Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
54,114
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
This is the ReptiBark
This is the coco coir
After prepping my outdoor area for Beans I've been thinking about how I can get some clean fill dirt in his enclosure... but it would be a lot of labor to move that amount of dirt on my own and I would also have to purchase a wheelbarrow and something to put it in for transport and rent a truck. Very unfortunate that all my friends that have those sorts of resources either don't have them anymore or have moved away and aren't currently in town LOL

So I'm considering a mixture of either ReptiBark/coco coir or Reptibark/topsoil because I think the price would be equal to the price of tools to move the dirt + hours in labor as a weak small baby (me) but also it seems that fir based orchid bark is not available in my area in bulk.

I live in Las Vegas so I'm quite concerned about being able to maintain the level of humidity for him as it's very dry and hot here. The dirt here is also very dry... He has been enjoying burrowing into the more humid ReptiBark that I set up for him temporarily, but he also has some injuries so I'm worried about him getting too messy in another substrate.

Dirt would be the ideal choice, but I'm just weighing my options because I don't already have the tools to move the dirt on hand so it would actually probably be equal if not more to try and get the dirt. Aside from the price (where dirt would typically be cheaper if you already had the resources to move it) is dirt particularly better than other substrates for an outdoor enclosure or would these be okay or is there anything else preferable that would be better for a Russian tortoise?
I just make my enclosures on the existing ground outside. No need to move dirt or use substrate.
 
Joined
May 13, 2021
Messages
39
Location (City and/or State)
Las Vegas, NV
I just make my enclosures on the existing ground outside. No need to move dirt or use substrate.
I really wish that was the case for me! Our whole backyard was remodeled awhile back so the only existing ground in my yard is old soil with perlite, stone tiles, and artificial turf. It’s pretty awful actually and I was too young to have a say when it was remodeled, but I actually think this is the most common renovation in Vegas. I’ve been working on removing the old soil but the wall only goes so far down so I do need to refill that space to allow him to dig. Maybe I could even sift the perlite out of the dirt? It just seems like more time and trouble than it’s worth.. but even then it’s not the existing ground, it was bagged soil probably from Lowe’s or something along those lines.
 

Blackdog1714

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jul 30, 2018
Messages
4,016
Location (City and/or State)
Richmond, VA
I really wish that was the case for me! Our whole backyard was remodeled awhile back so the only existing ground in my yard is old soil with perlite, stone tiles, and artificial turf. It’s pretty awful actually and I was too young to have a say when it was remodeled, but I actually think this is the most common renovation in Vegas. I’ve been working on removing the old soil but the wall only goes so far down so I do need to refill that space to allow him to dig. Maybe I could even sift the perlite out of the dirt? It just seems like more time and trouble than it’s worth.. but even then it’s not the existing ground, it was bagged soil probably from Lowe’s or something along those lines.
sources? Would definitely also run a magnet over the ground to find nails and screws from the construction. I use bagged cypress due to the clay content of my soil. Otherwise Tom is dead on, regular soil is fine just add plenty of shade
 
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