Redfoot tortoise enclosure

Iris Olmstead

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Joined
Sep 21, 2020
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7
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Randolph
Hi, I have two red foot tortoises that I got from a pet store recently I've had one for about a month and the second for a couple of days. They both seem to be doing well and getting along together in there enclosure but I want to build a bigger one now that there are two of them. What should I use for wood? How big should I make it for the both of them? What substraight should I use? And should I turn it into a bioactive environments? My first one is about 4 inches big and the second one is about 6 inches big.
 

Skip K

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Joined
Mar 4, 2020
Messages
331
Location (City and/or State)
Virginia
Just my two cents regarding my experiences over the decades. About housing multiple torts of same species or even of different species together ...I have done this and with 2 Redfoots of different sizes. Has there been an occasional ramming or dominating behavior...yes... but for the most part...no issues and more importantly no health related issues. The biggest problem causers I’ve noticed are too small of spaces and the way one feeds the torts. Torts are naturally solitary animals and have naturally hardwired instincts especially when it comes to feeding. I believe and have witnessed that these instincts can be modified to a degree. Forcing multiple torts to live in a small enclosure together without sight breaks and having only one feeding station...are the biggest problems I’ve discovered...in other words forcing them to constantly be together “face to face” as it were. Having one feeding station is a problem as this turns a natural “pecking order” into a stressful and potentially dangerous domineering situation. Ample space with sight breaks and multiple feeding stations with ample food have worked well with our various tort species...in reducing negative effects with housing multiple torts together especially indoors. I’ve found different species of torts will eventually come around if potential problem triggers are addressed. Some more than others because all species have there own particular ways about them... especially with the larger species and because of their size and subsequent logistical problems that arise as a result. Gender also comes in to play as the torts mature and this also must be factored in to the equation because this will be a major player exacerbating problems. Now some might think this is crazy but I also believe interaction with your torts has an effect. If you can spend enough time with them...you can become head of the pecking order if you will...which will help somewhat with bullying...but not everyone can devote that much time...or they believe in a just minimal interaction. But I’ve had much good fortune with this approach...and not just with Chelonians. To sum up...if certain conditions can be met...I’ve had little issue ...but if not met...could end very badly. Please remember...no one keeps their animals under the same circumstances...and I am simply relating my personal experiences...and always be prepared to make adjustments if necessary
 
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Iris Olmstead

New Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2020
Messages
7
Location (City and/or State)
Randolph
Are you able to build an outside enclosure.
Keeping two together in the confines of most indoors enclosures is not well advised.
Two Redfoot will need 2 enclosures.
I can't build an outside enclosure cause I live in Vermont and we're about to hit winter here.
 

Iris Olmstead

New Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2020
Messages
7
Location (City and/or State)
Randolph
Just my two cents regarding my experiences over the decades. About housing multiple torts of same species or even of different species together ...I have done this and with 2 Redfoots of different sizes. Has there been an occasional ramming or dominating behavior...yes... but for the most part...no issues and more importantly no health related issues. The biggest problem causers I’ve noticed are too small of spaces and the way one feeds the torts. Torts are naturally solitary animals and have naturally hardwired instincts especially when it comes to feeding. I believe and have witnessed that these instincts can be modified to a degree. Forcing multiple torts to live in a small enclosure together without sight breaks and having only one feeding station...are the biggest problems I’ve discovered...in other words forcing them to constantly be together “face to face” as it were. Having one feeding station is a problem as this turns a natural “pecking order” into a stressful and potentially dangerous domineering situation. Ample space with sight breaks and multiple feeding stations with ample food have worked well with our various tort species...in reducing negative effects with housing multiple torts together especially indoors. I’ve found different species of torts will eventually come around if potential problem triggers are addressed. Some more than others because all species have there own particular ways about them... especially with the larger species and because of their size and subsequent logistical problems that arise as a result. Gender also comes in to play as the torts mature and this also must be factored in to the equation because this will be a major player exacerbating problems. Now some might think this is crazy but I also believe interaction with your torts has an effect. If you can spend enough time with them...you can become head of the pecking order if you will...which will help somewhat with bullying...but not everyone can devote that much time...or they believe in a just minimal interaction. But I’ve had much good fortune with this approach...and not just with Chelonians. To sum up...if certain conditions can be met...I’ve had little issue ...but if not met...could end very badly. Please remember...no one keeps their animals under the same circumstances...and I am simply relating my personal experiences...and always be prepared to make adjustments if necessary
They seem to get along really well, they are always together, I have a lot of places that they can be without them being able to see each other but I will keep that in mind when building the next enclosure. What would be a recommended size for the enclosure?
 

Skip K

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 4, 2020
Messages
331
Location (City and/or State)
Virginia
They seem to get along really well, they are always together, I have a lot of places that they can be without them being able to see each other but I will keep that in mind when building the next enclosure. What would be a recommended size for the enclosure?
How much room can you afford to give them? If they are to be housed indoors full time they are going to need a big enclosure. Making a minimum size enclosure...they will outgrow quickly and you will need to spend more money and rebuild down the road . It should also be large enough that as they get bigger...if problems develop or you end up having a male and female...you can put a divider in the enclosure and each have enough room. My indoor enclosures are smaller than what I would consider optimum but my Redfoots get months of outdoor time in a 5’ x 20’ enclosure. If they are to be permanently inside...I’d say around 4’ x 15’ should handle them to adulthood.
 

Iris Olmstead

New Member
Joined
Sep 21, 2020
Messages
7
Location (City and/or State)
Randolph
How much room can you afford to give them? If they are to be housed indoors full time they are going to need a big enclosure. Making a minimum size enclosure...they will outgrow quickly and you will need to spend more money and rebuild down the road . It should also be large enough that as they get bigger...if problems develop or you end up having a male and female...you can put a divider in the enclosure and each have enough room. My indoor enclosures are smaller than what I would consider optimum but my Redfoots get months of outdoor time in a 5’ x 20’ enclosure. If they are to be permanently inside...I’d say around 4’ x 15’ should handle them to adulthood.
Thats really helpful, thank you so much
 
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