Questions about red foots

kmmmjjj

New Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2014
Messages
9
I'm getting a baby red foot in a few days and I have done lots and lots of research but I still have questions about them. Sorry if its too much though!

1. I live in Georgia. Is this a good place for red foots?

2. I'm still a bit confused and worried about keeping the humidity up for his enclosure. Easy tips to help keep it up? (I have a wooden enclosure I will be keeping inside and take outside on nice days.)

3. Which is better for a baby, sphagnum moss or cypress mulch?

4. Is it necessary to have a black light or something for the night? I'm getting one for winter but what about in the warmer seasons?

5. I've heard you had to spray down the substrate to sorta help keep the humidity up but other people say to have to keep it all dry. Which is it?

6. And lastly, are red foots easier to take care of than yellow foots? They are pretty similar but I've always wondered which one would be easier for a beginner like me to take care of.

Again, sorry for so many long questions! I'd greatly appreciated it if someone would help answer! :)
 

Twiggz

Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Jun 19, 2013
Messages
33
Location (City and/or State)
N. Ca
Hello, I'm sure someone more knowledgable will chime in soon. But I'll answer what I can.

1. I don't know, I've never been to Georgia. They are from south America, so that obviously is their ideal inviorment.

2. Some like to use a closed top enclosure to trap the humidity. Others like an open enclosure with a damp (not wet) substrate. In my area I use an open enclosure for indoor and mist them and their substrate a few times a day. I can keep the humidity at 85% this way. If I'm away and dont get to mist them it does drop to 60%.

3. I prefer sphagnum moss. It soft, doesn't mold, is safe if they ingest any and keeps the humidity up. I get it by the bale online.

4. CHE ceramic heat element. Gives heat and no light.

5. Damp, not wet. Too wet and they can get shel rot or a respiratory infection. If sphagnum moss is too dry it can get dusty.

6. I can't say. I only have experience with reds and three toe box turtles.

There are some great care sheets online. I used the one by turtle terry starting out. Mine are almost two years old. They are growing smooth and have never been sick.

There are never too many questions. :)
 

kmmmjjj

New Member
Joined
Oct 14, 2014
Messages
9
Hello, I'm sure someone more knowledgable will chime in soon. But I'll answer what I can.

1. I don't know, I've never been to Georgia. They are from south America, so that obviously is their ideal inviorment.

2. Some like to use a closed top enclosure to trap the humidity. Others like an open enclosure with a damp (not wet) substrate. In my area I use an open enclosure for indoor and mist them and their substrate a few times a day. I can keep the humidity at 85% this way. If I'm away and dont get to mist them it does drop to 60%.

3. I prefer sphagnum moss. It soft, doesn't mold, is safe if they ingest any and keeps the humidity up. I get it by the bale online.

4. CHE ceramic heat element. Gives heat and no light.

5. Damp, not wet. Too wet and they can get shel rot or a respiratory infection. If sphagnum moss is too dry it can get dusty.

6. I can't say. I only have experience with reds and three toe box turtles.

There are some great care sheets online. I used the one by turtle terry starting out. Mine are almost two years old. They are growing smooth and have never been sick.

There are never too many questions. :)

Thanks for answering my questions! And it did help a lot.
 

Yvonne G

Old Timer
TFO Admin
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Take a look through Tortoise Library It was put together by one of our moderators and contains a lot of helpful info about RF tortoises.
 
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