qill this lamp be to hot

Kylee L.

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
Messages
282
Location (City and/or State)
SC
I need a new lamp for my Russian, hes just over 1 years old. I'm tired of having to replace cheap lamps. will this lamp be to hot?
 

Attachments

  • Screenshot_20210422-121140_Samsung Internet.jpg
    Screenshot_20210422-121140_Samsung Internet.jpg
    209.4 KB · Views: 3

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
53,428
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
I need a new lamp for my Russian, hes just over 1 years old. I'm tired of having to replace cheap lamps. will this lamp be to hot?
I agree with Zeropilot. Those are not a good way to go for a multitude of reasons.

There are four elements to heating and lighting:
  1. Basking bulb. I use 65 watt incandescent floods from the hardware store. Some people will need bigger, or smaller wattage bulbs. Let your thermometer be your guide. I run them on a timer for about 12 hours and adjust the height to get the correct basking temp under them. I also like to use a flat rock of some sort directly under the bulb. You need to check the temp with a thermometer directly under the bulb and get it to around 95-100F (36-37C).
  2. Ambient heat maintenance. I use ceramic heating elements or radiant heat panels set on thermostats to maintain ambient above 80 degrees day and night for tropical species. You'd only need day heat for a temperate species like Testudo or DT, as long as your house stays above 60F (15-16C) at night.
  3. Light. I use LEDs for this purpose. Something in the 5000-6500K color range will look the best. Most bulbs at the store are in the 2500K range and they look yellowish. Strip or screw-in bulb types are both fine.
  4. UV. If you can get your tortoise outside for an hour 2 or 3 times a week, you won't need indoor UV. In the UK, get one of the newer HO type fluorescent tubes. Which type will depend on mounting height. 5.0 bulbs make almost no UV. I like the 12%. You need a meter to check this: https://www.solarmeter.com/model65.html
 

Kylee L.

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
Messages
282
Location (City and/or State)
SC
I agree with Zeropilot. Those are not a good way to go for a multitude of reasons.

There are four elements to heating and lighting:
  1. Basking bulb. I use 65 watt incandescent floods from the hardware store. Some people will need bigger, or smaller wattage bulbs. Let your thermometer be your guide. I run them on a timer for about 12 hours and adjust the height to get the correct basking temp under them. I also like to use a flat rock of some sort directly under the bulb. You need to check the temp with a thermometer directly under the bulb and get it to around 95-100F (36-37C).
  2. Ambient heat maintenance. I use ceramic heating elements or radiant heat panels set on thermostats to maintain ambient above 80 degrees day and night for tropical species. You'd only need day heat for a temperate species like Testudo or DT, as long as your house stays above 60F (15-16C) at night.
  3. Light. I use LEDs for this purpose. Something in the 5000-6500K color range will look the best. Most bulbs at the store are in the 2500K range and they look yellowish. Strip or screw-in bulb types are both fine.
  4. UV. If you can get your tortoise outside for an hour 2 or 3 times a week, you won't need indoor UV. In the UK, get one of the newer HO type fluorescent tubes. Which type will depend on mounting height. 5.0 bulbs make almost no UV. I like the 12%. You need a meter to check this: https://www.solarmeter.com/model65.html
I agree with Zeropilot. Those are not a good way to go for a multitude of reasons.

There are four elements to heating and lighting:
  1. Basking bulb. I use 65 watt incandescent floods from the hardware store. Some people will need bigger, or smaller wattage bulbs. Let your thermometer be your guide. I run them on a timer for about 12 hours and adjust the height to get the correct basking temp under them. I also like to use a flat rock of some sort directly under the bulb. You need to check the temp with a thermometer directly under the bulb and get it to around 95-100F (36-37C).
  2. Ambient heat maintenance. I use ceramic heating elements or radiant heat panels set on thermostats to maintain ambient above 80 degrees day and night for tropical species. You'd only need day heat for a temperate species like Testudo or DT, as long as your house stays above 60F (15-16C) at night.
  3. Light. I use LEDs for this purpose. Something in the 5000-6500K color range will look the best. Most bulbs at the store are in the 2500K range and they look yellowish. Strip or screw-in bulb types are both fine.
  4. UV. If you can get your tortoise outside for an hour 2 or 3 times a week, you won't need indoor UV. In the UK, get one of the newer HO type fluorescent tubes. Which type will depend on mounting height. 5.0 bulbs make almost no UV. I like the 12%. You need a meter to check this: https://www.solarmeter.com/model65.html
wow! I didnt know floof lights got that hot! He has his slab that heats between 90 and 100, also on a timer for 14 hours, I turn it back to 12 in the summer. I also use the ceramic heat emitter, in winter only, my house stays above 65 at night. I do have some LED lights I use to grow his enclosure plants that lights most of his enclosure plus a UVB light at the other end. I may take it down and start taking him outside during the week . Thank you for your help!
 

ZenHerper

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
1,028
Location (City and/or State)
New Jersey
wow! I didnt know flood lights got that hot! ...
You have to find an incandescent flood bulb, not the new, cool-running LED ones.

If your bulbs are blowing out often, you may have a mis-match with the power rating of the fixture, a/or with your electrical supply (surges). Post some photos if in doubt. I use very affordable exo-t*rra bulbs for a number of applications, but even the 60W strength needs a ceramic fixture on a surge-protected strip to last. My current bulbs in this class have been running for a year, at least.
 

Kylee L.

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
Messages
282
Location (City and/or State)
SC
You have to find an incandescent flood bulb, not the new, cool-running LED ones.

If your bulbs are blowing out often, you may have a mis-match with the power rating of the fixture, a/or with your electrical supply (surges). Post some photos if in doubt. I use very affordable exo-t*rra bulbs for a number of applications, but even the 60W strength needs a ceramic fixture on a surge-protected strip to last. My current bulbs in this class have been running for a year, at least.
this is a light bulb for basking, not an LED. it came with the lamp that had the ceramic fixture, could you post a pic of what you use
 

ZenHerper

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 27, 2020
Messages
1,028
Location (City and/or State)
New Jersey
this is a light bulb for basking, not an LED. it came with the lamp that had the ceramic fixture, could you post a pic of what you use
"Spot" or basking bulbs concentrate a lot of heat in a narrow beam...that may account for their short lives. (Complaints to producers and retailers sometimes yield free replacements from time to time. Sometimes. Worth a try.)

I can post my set up for my application, but that does not help anyone give advice about your set up and your species.

In this photo I am using an exo-terra 60W incandescent bulb in an 8.5 inch ceramic lamp. This fixture is On 16 hours a day, and this bulb has lasted a year. (Look @Yvonne G - hermit crabs!! lol)

Hi Yvonne 042221.JPG

A tortoise habitat needs more heat, but not necessarily a whopping load of light. You may have better success with a Ceramic Heat Emitter bulb (CHE) combined with an incandescent light bulb. Again, this is theoretical. The MVB you posted in your OP will definitely be a lot of glare over your pet - they may not like it and have a tendency to hide.
 

Kylee L.

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 3, 2019
Messages
282
Location (City and/or State)
SC
"Spot" or basking bulbs concentrate a lot of heat in a narrow beam...that may account for their short lives. (Complaints to producers and retailers sometimes yield free replacements from time to time. Sometimes. Worth a try.)

I can post my set up for my application, but that does not help anyone give advice about your set up and your species.

In this photo I am using an exo-terra 60W incandescent bulb in an 8.5 inch ceramic lamp. This fixture is On 16 hours a day, and this bulb has lasted a year. (Look @Yvonne G - hermit crabs!! lol)

View attachment 323677

A tortoise habitat needs more heat, but not necessarily a whopping load of light. You may have better success with a Ceramic Heat Emitter bulb (CHE) combined with an incandescent light bulb. Again, this is theoretical. The MVB you posted in your OP will definitely be a lot of glare over your pet - they may not like it and have a tendency to hide.
this is what I have. I wonder if it's the type of bulb.. I did get a surge protector and I'm going to plug it into that and see if it helps. Thank you for helping me, I'll try the exo terra bulb.
 
TortoiseSupply.com

New Posts

Top