Pyramiding in young pancakes

Mikeg

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Dec 4, 2011
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Hey folks!

So I just picked these two little ones up today (hatched in january) They obviously have some pyramiding starting. What I am concerned with is the divot behind mid-point along the vertebral scutes. What are your thoughts? I will be supplementing their food with calcium powder and repashy superveggie. I will also be feeding a staple of spring mix, yellow squash/zucchini, diced carrots, bell pepper, collard greens, occasional kale, and radichio. They were kept on aspen and only soaked until they were eating, but had access to a water bowl. I'm thinking this is correlated to using a coil uvb bulb and not providing them with enough humidity as they've been growing (their past conditions). I have them on a power sun uvb, will be soaking daily, slate to climb on and under, access to water, a humid hide, and organic compost as substrate for a little moisture retention. Let me know if there is anything else you recommend I do to help get these guys nice and straightened out. 20171021_180108.jpg 20171021_180101.jpg
 

CourtneyG

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Sounds like you are doing everything right to promote smoother growth. When I got my youngest female from someone she was just as bad as these babies and she smoothed out so much with a correct diet and humidity level. 20161102_113758.jpg
 

Kapidolo Farms

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I have seen this in a few cohorts of hatchlings. Some from my own groups at home. I resolved it by raising humidity and making sure they drank alot, and increasing calcium intake.

When I was at the Philly zoo this never happened, but the neonates were raised in a basement with an average 78% RH, minimum ambient of 82F and I daily placed them on moist paper towels in plastic boxes on a slight slope with some extra water at the bottom of the slop. There was no 'heat spot', but an ambient that would go into the upper 80F daily. That basement had very consistent 'climate' year round.

I used small yogurt cup lids for water trays and after changing the paper towel I would place them in that cup top with water. Sometimes they would just sit there for hours, then go eat.

The deal with pancakes is that the gaps between the bones (fenestra) never fill in and an imbalance of hydration, RH and nutrients will lead to the malformation of the their shell rather easily.
 

Eric Stewart

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Hey folks!

So I just picked these two little ones up today (hatched in january) They obviously have some pyramiding starting. What I am concerned with is the divot behind mid-point along the vertebral scutes. What are your thoughts? I will be supplementing their food with calcium powder and repashy superveggie. I will also be feeding a staple of spring mix, yellow squash/zucchini, diced carrots, bell pepper, collard greens, occasional kale, and radichio. They were kept on aspen and only soaked until they were eating, but had access to a water bowl. I'm thinking this is correlated to using a coil uvb bulb and not providing them with enough humidity as they've been growing (their past conditions). I have them on a power sun uvb, will be soaking daily, slate to climb on and under, access to water, a humid hide, and organic compost as substrate for a little moisture retention. Let me know if there is anything else you recommend I do to help get these guys nice and straightened out. View attachment 220953 View attachment 220954
I know in sulcata, pyramiding isn't just humidity and UV, but also diet related. Perhaps there's too much proteins given ie squash, zucchini and collard. I don't feed carrot unless a beta carotene issue is present or if I'm dealing with box turtles . Just so you're aware bell pepper is a no feed and with spring mix the spinach(no feed) and red chard(causes indigestion)have to be removed. From what I've read a pancake's diet is quite similar and they need more grasses, safe weeds, plants and flowers. Hope this helps. x
 

Tom

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I know in sulcata, pyramiding isn't just humidity and UV, but also diet related. Perhaps there's too much proteins given ie squash, zucchini and collard. I don't feed carrot unless a beta carotene issue is present or if I'm dealing with box turtles . Just so you're aware bell pepper is a no feed and with spring mix the spinach(no feed) and red chard(causes indigestion)have to be removed. From what I've read a pancake's diet is quite similar and they need more grasses, safe weeds, plants and flowers. Hope this helps. x
You are quoting a bunch of old, out-dated, incorrect information. You are parroting what has been parroted to you.

Pyramiding is NOT caused by food. It is cause by growth in conditions that are too dry.

Protein does not cause pyramiding.

UV does not prevent pyramiding, but we are finding that some UV lights do contribute to pyramiding by drying out the carapace too much, even in humid conditions.

Bell pepper, red chard and spinach are all fine to feed in small amounts as part of a varied diet.

Welcome to the forum. I hope you'll let us catch you up to speed.
 
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