Possible Respiratory Infection

Tort4Tort

New Member
Joined
May 13, 2020
Messages
10
Location (City and/or State)
Connecticut
I think my Russian tortoise might be sick or possibly have a respiratory infection.

I noticed him yawning twice today, and he's just been sort of basking and sleeping all day. When I offered him food today he ate it, but I'm just very concerned. He's also been blinking a lot, I'm not sure if thats normal.

I just got him about a week ago. I already have a vet appointment for this Friday as just a regular check up. But if anyone could give me some info on this or personal advice I'd appreciate it.
 

nicoleann2214

Well-Known Member
Joined
Mar 11, 2020
Messages
827
Location (City and/or State)
NY
I think my Russian tortoise might be sick or possibly have a respiratory infection.

I noticed him yawning twice today, and he's just been sort of basking and sleeping all day. When I offered him food today he ate it, but I'm just very concerned. He's also been blinking a lot, I'm not sure if thats normal.

I just got him about a week ago. I already have a vet appointment for this Friday as just a regular check up. But if anyone could give me some info on this or personal advice I'd appreciate it.
What’re your temps
 
L

LasTortugasNinja

Guest
Resp infections for reptiles usually exhibit themselves as whistling breathing, bubbles or mucus from the nose or mouth, clawing at the face when there is nothing there. Humidity issues are usually the cause and changing the humidity usually fixes it up.
You said you only had him a week... he’s still acclimating. Takes a month or so for reptiles to get into the groove of things.

careful with vets. With reptiles they do far more harm than good.
 

Tort4Tort

New Member
Joined
May 13, 2020
Messages
10
Location (City and/or State)
Connecticut
Resp infections for reptiles usually exhibit themselves as whistling breathing, bubbles or mucus from the nose or mouth, clawing at the face when there is nothing there. Humidity issues are usually the cause and changing the humidity usually fixes it up.
You said you only had him a week... he’s still acclimating. Takes a month or so for reptiles to get into the groove of things.

careful with vets. With reptiles they do far more harm than good.
Yeah, I was thinking that it could be because he's still acclimating but it's the first time I've seen him do it, and since this post he's done it a couple more times as well.

I keep my humidity between 50 and 60, could that be causing it?

I don't mean to bother you with these questions especially because they're only based off of speculations, I'm just concerned 😅
 
L

LasTortugasNinja

Guest
Yeah, I was thinking that it could be because he's still acclimating but it's the first time I've seen him do it, and since this post he's done it a couple more times as well.

I keep my humidity between 50 and 60, could that be causing it?

I don't mean to bother you with these questions especially because they're only based off of speculations, I'm just concerned 😅
depends on age. Hatchlings and young torts smaller than 4" shells should have higher humidity (80% to 100%). Adults should have high humidity in the mornings (50% to 60%) and drying out to around 25% to 35% in the afternoons. Below 25% increases health risks to humans and pets.
 
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