Plant ID

Pearly

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Does anyone else think number four could be a brassica? I don't know about the purple veins but the shape of the leaves and the way they are placed around the stem makes me think so.
That looks more like something sage-like to me (those seed pods do anyway)
 

JoesMum

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1. Don't know - not violet
2. Plantain - safe
3. Dock - do not feed
4. Don't know
5. Primula of some sort - do not feed
 

Pearly

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Oops, didn't see the seeds! I'm at a complete loss now.
I know! Me too! No idea! Though it seems I've seen similar foliage at one of my nurseries being sold as perennial with the ajugas????.... or salvias?..... don't know. Let's wait for it to bloom
 

zovick

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6 looks like Smilax

Yes, #6 is a Smilax of some type or another. There are variants with different shaped leaves, but the vines all have thorns. This is commonly called Greenbriar Vine and also Cow Vine. It is said that deer eat the leaves and the berries. I know my tortoises don't eat it even though they do see it when it grows faster than I can get rid of it. It grows from a bulb or tuber deep in the ground and that must be found to eradicate the source of the pesky vines.
 

Pearly

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Yes, #6 is a Smilax of some type or another. There are variants with different shaped leaves, but the vines all have thorns. This is commonly called Greenbriar Vine and also Cow Vine. It is said that deer eat the leaves and the berries. I know my tortoises don't eat it even though they do see it when it grows faster than I can get rid of it. It grows from a bulb or tuber deep in the ground and that must be found to eradicate the source of the pesky vines.
I guess I must have never dug my trowel deep enough in my hard Texas soil to get them out bcs I have had few by the fence that have been coming back for 21 yrs
 

zovick

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I guess I must have never dug my trowel deep enough in my hard Texas soil to get them out bcs I have had few by the fence that have been coming back for 21 yrs

We have that hard soil in GA, too. I wait until after a good rain, then dig down with a shovel, carefully following the root. Some of the bulbs are a foot and more under the surface.
 

Pearly

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We have that hard soil in GA, too. I wait until after a good rain, then dig down with a shovel, carefully following the root. Some of the bulbs are a foot and more under the surface.
Good point. I should do that for the areas where it's compacted, but there are few spots where I always manage to hit some rocks. We are on the edge of Texas Hill Country which sits on bedrock of limestone. Thanks for mentioning how deep that bulb/tuber is, I'll carry my long/narrow shovel with me now. Determined to get those darn things out for good
 
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