Plant ID anyone?

LaLaP

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IMG_5158.JPG IMG_5159.JPG IMG_5157.JPG This one has me confused because I've seen it called different things.. some feedable, some not.
It's slightly fuzzy.. and suddenly everywhere I look including this pot.
(I think it is mislabeled in the plant ID sticky as milk thistle btw)
Thanks in advance for the help!
 

RosemaryDW

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Is that from a tortoise seed mix? Looks like a turnip to me.
 

LaLaP

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Is that from a tortoise seed mix? Looks like a turnip to me.
No, not from a seed mix. It's all over my neighborhood right now so I assume it's just a weed. I'll pull some up tomorrow and look at the root.
 

Cari48038

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View attachment 258283 View attachment 258284 View attachment 258282 This one has me confused because I've seen it called different things.. some feedable, some not.
It's slightly fuzzy.. and suddenly everywhere I look including this pot.
(I think it is mislabeled in the plant ID sticky as milk thistle btw)
Thanks in advance for the help!
There are a couple apps you can download on your phone that you can use to identify plants and flowers by taking a picture of them.
 

LaLaP

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There are a couple apps you can download on your phone that you can use to identify plants and flowers by taking a picture of them.
I have 2 of those apps but I don't think it's correct in its ID. The only one that looks even close is rumex dock but I don't think it is. I never have luck with those apps.
 

RosemaryDW

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I really feel it’s turnip, looking at the stem; the leaves would have some soft bristles on the larger leaves. There is a wild turnip that seems pretty common in your area.

It could be wild mustard or radish, all in the same family and all safe in moderation. None of them will have much of a root.

Wild turnip:

8E22257F-E68F-468E-8B81-2C1382CC8E34.jpeg
 

Yvonne G

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It looks sort of like wild mustard to me.
 

LaLaP

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It does look a bit like that wild turnip. Not nipplewort cause I have a lot of that growing and they are a bit different. And it does look a bit like wild mustard. Hmm. What about the taste of those? I just chewed on a leaf and it just tastes like an icky plant taste not like mustard greens or turnip greens.... but do the wild varieties have a similar taste?
 

RosemaryDW

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Wild mustard is pretty bitter, especially as it matures. I wouldn’t think it’s too bitter now but I like my greens bitter so young mustard doesn’t taste bad to me.

I’ve never had a wild turnip; I can’t imagine it would taste as good as domesticated ones though.

All the wild ones are more intense and bitter because... they’re wild! We’ve bred the most intense bitterness out of them for human consumption. Fortunately, Russians in the wild eat bitter, scrubby things all the time. My Russian is like me, bitter is the best!
 

LaLaP

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Wild mustard is pretty bitter, especially as it matures. I wouldn’t think it’s too bitter now but I like my greens bitter so young mustard doesn’t taste bad to me.

I’ve never had a wild turnip; I can’t imagine it would taste as good as domesticated ones though.

All the wild ones are more intense and bitter because... they’re wild! We’ve bred the most intense bitterness out of them for human consumption. Fortunately, Russians in the wild eat bitter, scrubby things all the time. My Russian is like me, bitter is the best!
Haha! I like bitter greens too but my tort boys have been softened by their years of pampered domestication... they don't go for the bitter stuff without some pressure.
Well I appreciate the help on this plant. I'll keep asking around and let you know if I find out for certain.
 
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