Need info Kane heat mats

Kipley

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My Redfoots have outgrown their indoor table and need to move to a large enclosure in my unheated garage for the winter. I have a RHP already, and will be adding a Kane mat.
I have a Herpstat dual outlet thermostat. I'll use one outlet for the RHP and the other for the Kane mat. The Herpstat is pretty nice - can be programmed as a timer or humidistat to control a humidifier. The thermostat setting allows me to program a typical on/off response to temp, or a dimming function, more like a rheostat.
Would it be best to use the dimming function?
And should I lay the temp probe on the mat, or hang it above? My understanding, and it is limited...is that the mat doesn't heat ambient air, it is a conduction type heat? The tortoise has to be on the mat to enjoy the heat, correct? So it seems a temp probe hanging mid air isn't going to be of much use for the mat, and it would be better to have the probe touching the mat?
Thanks for any suggestions.

And Thanks for moving this post to an appropriate spot!
 
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Yvonne G

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I don't have Kane experience, only having ever used Osborne pig blankets, but the 'controller' for them was up at the electrical outlet, sensing the temperature at that location, so I don't think that's true about them being conduction. I know the RHP are conduction. I used pig blankets in my tortoise sheds for over 20 years and never had a heating problem until I switched to RHP heating. That was last winter. I've since switched back to pig blankets. I think one needs to consider the area. My sheds and RHP didn't work, but I have a night house in a greenhouse and in there the RHP works great.
 

Kipley

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I don't have Kane experience, only having ever used Osborne pig blankets, but the 'controller' for them was up at the electrical outlet, sensing the temperature at that location, so I don't think that's true about them being conduction. I know the RHP are conduction. I used pig blankets in my tortoise sheds for over 20 years and never had a heating problem until I switched to RHP heating. That was last winter. I've since switched back to pig blankets. I think one needs to consider the area. My sheds and RHP didn't work, but I have a night house in a greenhouse and in there the RHP works great.
Thanks Yvonne for replying.
Conduction heat relies on contact between the heat source and whatever is being heated (my simple, I'm-not-quite-awake-and-need-more-coffee-explanation), RHP use radiant heat, which "radiates" out from the heat source. At least this is my understanding.

I hope somebody with Kane and possible Herpstat experience can offer some insight.
 

Markw84

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All heat sources can heat by conduction, radiation and convection. Low-heat heat sources are just not good at all at convection as the heat source is way too low to heat enough air hot enough to appreciably raise the air temperature.

Low-heat heat sources do heat primarily by radiant heat. But both can heat by conduction if something is in direct contact with it. The RHP is designed to use radiant heat as it is to be placed where there is no direct contact. However, because of the low 110° operating temperature, it is not efficient at heating a larger space, as the benefit of the heat radiated is fairly local to perhaps a few feet right in front of the panel.

A pig blanket is designed for conduction heating. It is meant to be laid on. It also is designed to operate at a low temperature in the 95°-100° range so as to not overheat whatever is on it. I personally would want a control at the mat itself to ensure it does not get too hot and stays more in the 90° range to avoid plastron overheating.
 
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