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Nat. Geo Article about Aldabra islands and tortoises.

Holycow

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Sep 26, 2012
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162
Location (City and/or State)
Homestead ,FL
Wow, the ones in the states sure live the high life compared to its wild family. Thanks for sharing.
My thoughts exactly. This is a barren and unforgiving place. It really does make sense that the weights and growth rates for captive individuals greatly outpace their wild counterparts.
It is pure conjecture on my part, but perhaps the famous longevity of this species is due in part to its evolved natural toughness on virtually every physical level - a necessity simply to be able to survive in a place like this (!).
 

orv

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Apr 24, 2014
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392
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Aguanga, CA
This National Geographic article engenders my continued respect for these ancient ones. We are their stewards, not their owners. There is so very much we have yet to learn for their proper care; they are so forgiving and long-lived. I am smitten . . . my wife and I just love to watch and learn. As always, Orvil
 

bouaboua

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Dec 7, 2013
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San Jose CA
Great read. Wow! Very nice article. Thank you for sharing.
 

Mantissa3

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Jul 1, 2013
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235
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San Francisco Bay Area
Reading this article and seeing the pictures of the wild herd, I'm struck by how Aldabraman's animals look EXACTLY like the wild ones. That is an amazing feat by a US keeper and breeder - to replicate their natural conditions so closely that they acheive perfectly smooth shells and the same breeding behaviours. Absolutely stunning work, Aldabraman!
 

Alaskamike

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Jul 2, 2014
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1,742
Location (City and/or State)
South Florida
I agree that @ALDABRAMAN has beautiful and healthy Giants. But he certainly does not raise them like their wild counterparts- they have better food / hydration - even temperature regulation than they would have on the atoll.

For me , I don't try to duplicate a wild environment, rather take the best we can learn from it and improve on it. That's why our survival rate for hatchlings is almost 100%, compared to 5-10% in nature - some really tough years almost zero.

To raise the populations of endangered species like the Aldabras and Gallops the babies are raised to 3-5 years old then released. This has greatly improved the survival rates.

I do love the Giants of the tortoise world. Like living dinosaurs !
 

BetZBear1

New Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2015
Messages
22
Location (City and/or State)
Slidell, Louisiana
Very cool article! I remember seeing the Galapagos Tortoises in a magazine when I was about 6 yrs old and falling in love with tortoises and turtles at that moment!
 

popeye tortoise

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Joined
Oct 25, 2015
Messages
390
Location (City and/or State)
Pennsylvania
I am a newbie when it comes to the Aldabra. I have my 1st one about 8 months old. All of my tortoise experience is with Sulcatas. This is why this forum is a important find for me. I want to make sure to do all the right things.
 

TammyJ

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Jun 21, 2016
Messages
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Location (City and/or State)
Jamaica
We actually arrange a 2 week Expedition to Aldabra Island on February 2015.
It is still not easy. Really not easy!!
we hope to be sucessfull.

If so, we will post some more Pictures of Aldabras in natural environment!

Jemo
Get some cool pics of the Somali Pirates too!!! Just kidding.:D
 

Kapidolo Farms

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Nov 7, 2012
Messages
4,686
Location (City and/or State)
South of Southern California, but not Mexico
How do they get fresh water to drink?
You may have noticed that Aldabra tortoises have very pointy noses. There could be a tablespoon of water from fog or condensation in a curled leaf or small depression in a rock, they can poke their pointy nose there and suck it up through their nostrils.
 
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