My Latest Endeavor...

Tom

The Dog Trainer
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Their behavior is so fascinating and so complex.
This is one of my all time favorite threads.
I am so glad you share your experience and your learning with us.
I can't wait to see what this year brings!
Are you doing anything differently with them than if we weren't in a coronavirus lockdown?
Since what you do with them is pretty solitary, do you think the restrictions will impact your hunting activities much?
Thanks so much. I enjoy these birds and working with them so much, and I want to share that joy with anyone else who is interested. Its not practical for most people to get a falconry license and spend all the time and effort to pursue this sport/activity, but I've found that many people are interested and curious about what it is. I've even found a few people who didn't like it because they misunderstood what it is and what is really happening, and they now see it differently. Other people already thought is sounded fun and interesting, but like it even more ow that they understand more about it.

My goal here is not to encourage people to get into falconry. That has to come from within, and it can't be encouraged or created. That drive is innate, and people either have it or they don't. My goal here is to give a first hand representation of what falconry is, and isn't, and show it in the positive light that it deserves. Hunting and falconry is certainly not ever going to be everyone's cup o' tea, but I love sharing it with people who are interested, and I'd also love it if people who are not in to it at least have a better understanding of what it really is. It is truly an ancient art form, and unless someone knows and spends time with a practitioner of this art, it would be tough to understand what its all about, and easy to from misconceptions. Enough philosophy...

Our hunting season ended before "they" decided to shut down the world, so it hasn't had any effect on the birds. Since hunting consists of me walking around all alone out in the middle of a big empty filed, it wouldn't have had any impact anyway.

I am of the opinion that this whole covid situation, at the very least, has been a huge over reaction, and a terrible and scary example of government mismanagement, over reach and ineptitude. I can't stop them from doing what they are doing, but on a personal level, this whole thing has had minimal impact on my day to day life, with the notable exception that I no longer have a job. I still do whatever I want to do, with some sense and consideration thrown in, but I can't make them unlock the world and let me go back to work. The only effect this will have on me if it continues long term is to give me more time to fly my birds since I never have to go to work. :) If I lose my house I'll at least know of lots of good rabbit fields where I can set up a tent and have plenty of food to catch. :D
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
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I love this thread too! I never saw Minerva or any of the redtails in that big flight cage. Is it because these are Harris hawks? Do these ever have to live in that little cage the redtails were in? I forget what you called it...a mew?
These "cages" are more suitable for Harris Hawks because of their extremely social nature. It is best for them to be able to see everything going on around them, and be mentally stimulated by it all. Redtails, and most other birds of prey, are the opposite. All the visual stimulation is very stressful and unnerving to them. We use a traditional mew for those other species, because it limits their visual field and greatly reduces their stress level. They don't like to feel exposed. Also, most other raptors, due the visual cues all around them would fly into the see-through cage walls and hurt themselves or damage their feathers. We make and use traditional mews to keep the birds safe and comfortable. Harris hawks need just the opposite to be kept safe and comfortable. They want to see the world going on around them and be part of it. These "mews" I'm using for the Harris hawks, are the same size as the previous mew that I used for Minerva and Tacoma.
 

Calaveras

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Joined
Dec 15, 2019
Messages
46
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Sacramento area California
556C1B7D-E814-4855-B978-B669578EBA44.jpeg
here is a picture of my mews. I am using a rope perch for the summer. It gives and swings when she lands on it which I believe she prefers.
She is well on her way to a good molt. The 80 degree days in California really get the feathers dropping.
The pink stuff is bird poop. I spray it with an enzyme based cleanser called poop-off to make it easier to clean. It turns pink.
 

wccmog10

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Georgia
I have to say, from one falconer to another- you do an excellent job describing falconry for everyone. It takes time and effort to put these posts together, and you do it very well. I feel falconry is well represented and I appreciate what you are doing.
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
49,006
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
I have to say, from one falconer to another- you do an excellent job describing falconry for everyone. It takes time and effort to put these posts together, and you do it very well. I feel falconry is well represented and I appreciate what you are doing.
Awe shucks.... Thanks man.

Now get your butts out here with your birds this winter and go hunting with me!!! You're going to have to spend some time teaching your birds to look down. You know, at the ground.

:p
 

Cathie G

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Joined
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Messages
4,433
Location (City and/or State)
Lancaster
Thanks so much. I enjoy these birds and working with them so much, and I want to share that joy with anyone else who is interested. Its not practical for most people to get a falconry license and spend all the time and effort to pursue this sport/activity, but I've found that many people are interested and curious about what it is. I've even found a few people who didn't like it because they misunderstood what it is and what is really happening, and they now see it differently. Other people already thought is sounded fun and interesting, but like it even more ow that they understand more about it.

My goal here is not to encourage people to get into falconry. That has to come from within, and it can't be encouraged or created. That drive is innate, and people either have it or they don't. My goal here is to give a first hand representation of what falconry is, and isn't, and show it in the positive light that it deserves. Hunting and falconry is certainly not ever going to be everyone's cup o' tea, but I love sharing it with people who are interested, and I'd also love it if people who are not in to it at least have a better understanding of what it really is. It is truly an ancient art form, and unless someone knows and spends time with a practitioner of this art, it would be tough to understand what its all about, and easy to from misconceptions. Enough philosophy...

Our hunting season ended before "they" decided to shut down the world, so it hasn't had any effect on the birds. Since hunting consists of me walking around all alone out in the middle of a big empty filed, it wouldn't have had any impact anyway.

I am of the opinion that this whole covid situation, at the very least, has been a huge over reaction, and a terrible and scary example of government mismanagement, over reach and ineptitude. I can't stop them from doing what they are doing, but on a personal level, this whole thing has had minimal impact on my day to day life, with the notable exception that I no longer have a job. I still do whatever I want to do, with some sense and consideration thrown in, but I can't make them unlock the world and let me go back to work. The only effect this will have on me if it continues long term is to give me more time to fly my birds since I never have to go to work. :) If I lose my house I'll at least know of lots of good rabbit fields where I can set up a tent and have plenty of food to catch. :D
👍
 

Sue Ann

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Joined
Mar 19, 2019
Messages
309
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chapin , South Carolina
View attachment 293913
here is a picture of my mews. I am using a rope perch for the summer. It gives and swings when she lands on it which I believe she prefers.
She is well on her way to a good molt. The 80 degree days in California really get the feathers dropping.
The pink stuff is bird poop. I spray it with an enzyme based cleanser called poop-off to make it easier to clean. It turns pink.
Thanks for the explanation, I thought blood and it was a little unnerving, Lol.
 

Moozillion

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(...checks this thread periodically....tapping foot patiently...re-checks thread...sighs and scowls at calendar...)

HINT HINT HINT, TOM!!! 😇
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
10 Year Member!
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jan 9, 2010
Messages
49,006
Location (City and/or State)
Southern California
(...checks this thread periodically....tapping foot patiently...re-checks thread...sighs and scowls at calendar...)

HINT HINT HINT, TOM!!! 😇
I decided to move them back to the ranch. They weren't fond of all the dogs running around the back yard and they really didn't like the gardeners. Also, while everyone recommends keeping them together. I saw some bullying. Morty was chasing and intimidating Rick on a regular basis. More experienced falconers have told me to just let them sort out their pecking order, and they seem to be fine, but I worry about chronic stress. Not seeing any signs of that, but watching closely.

At the ranch, there are two enclosures joined by a central corridor. I tied the doors open and the birds have the option of sitting together in the same mew, or they can separate themselves and each sit in there own enclosure alone. I saw them separate once, but every other time, I see them sitting together. They even eat sitting within a few feet of each other. Its pretty neat.
IMG_0608.jpg
 

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