Mushrooms

tortadise

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Many times it is brought up as to which mushrooms can be fed to certain tortoises. Best case when finding them growing wild is NOT to feed them to your tortoises. With so many species of mushrooms 53 genus and 112 species and many more unclassified yet too. They can be a serious treat or a serious threat to your tortoise. In genera they are rather low in nutrition and filling aspects.

We feed mushrooms to a variety of species of tortoises at our center. Most species will eat them but many are favored by. Yellow foot, red foot, erosa, homeana, zombensis, forstenii, elongata, Pyxis, and Manouria.

Nutritional data for some common ones may vary with species of course;
Mushrooms (brown, Italian)
or Crimini (raw)
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy113 kJ (27 kcal)
Carbohydrates
4.1 g
Fat
0.1 g
Protein
2.5 g
Vitamins
Thiamine (B1)
(9%)
0.1 mg
Riboflavin (B2)
(42%)
0.5 mg
Niacin (B3)
(25%)
3.8 mg
Pantothenic acid (B5)
(30%)
1.5 mg
Vitamin C
(0%)
0 mg
Trace metals
Calcium
(2%)
18 mg
Phosphorus
(17%)
120 mg
Potassium
(10%)
448 mg
Sodium
(0%)
6 mg
Zinc
(12%)
1.1 mg
Percentages are roughly approximated usingUS recommendations for adults.Source: USDA Nutrient Database

Common species that can be fed to tortoises and also humans too.

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Agaricus (white mushroom, button mushroom): Widely available; varies in color from white to light brown and in size from small to jumbo stuffer; plump and dome-shaped; pleasing flavor intensifies when cooked. Mature Agaricus with open veils have an intensely rich taste. Agaricus is quite versatile, being excellent for use both raw and cooked. Also available canned and dried.

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Chanterelle (girolle): Vase-shaped; ranging in color from bright yellow to orange; nutty and delicate flavor and texture; expensive when fresh; also available dried and canned. Add late in the cooking process to avoid toughening. Use in salads, sauces and risottos.
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Crimini (Italian brown): Naturally dark cap that ranges in color from light tan to rich brown; rich, earthy flavor is more intense than that of the Agaricus. Substitute for button mushrooms to add a more full-bodied flavor.

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Shiitake (oak mushroom; Chinese black mushroom; forest mushroom; golden oak): ranging in color from tan to dark brown; characterized by broad, umbrella shaped caps up to ten inches in diameter, wide open veils and tan gills; rich, full-bodied flavor, almost steak-like, with a meaty texture when cooked. These are best when cooked in almost any method, particularly sautéing, broiling and baking. Remove stems before cooking but reserve them for soup stocks.

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Oyster: Fluted cap resembles a fan; ranging in color from a soft beige brown to gray; can be eaten raw in salads but more often this mushroom is cooked to bring out its delicate flavor and velvety texture. Some say this mushroom has a faint oyster-like or seafood flavor, to match its likeness in shape to oysters.

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Enoki (enokitake; enokidake; snow puff mushrooms; golden mushrooms; velvet stem): Long stems and tiny, snow-white caps; small white mushrooms are joined at the base and resemble bean sprouts; light and mild, almost fruity, flavor with a crisp texture. Also available canned. Before using, cut away from the communal base. Use in sandwiches, salads and as garnishes. If you use them in a cooked dish, add at the last possible moment as heat toughens enoki.

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Enoki (enokitake; enokidake; snow puff mushrooms; golden mushrooms; velvet stem): Long stems and tiny, snow-white caps; small white mushrooms are joined at the base and resemble bean sprouts; light and mild, almost fruity, flavor with a crisp texture. Also available canned. Before using, cut away from the communal base. Use in sandwiches, salads and as garnishes. If you use them in a cooked dish, add at the last possible moment as heat toughens enoki.

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Porcini (cepes; boletes; boletus; steinpilze; singular tense: porcino): Resembles the traditional fairytale toadstool; weighing from a couple of ounces to a pound each with caps from one to ten inches in diameter; smooth, meaty texture; pungent in flavor; pale brown color; very expensive; many general cooking uses. Also available dried.


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Morel (black morel): A relative of the highly-prized truffle; tan to dark-brown, cone-shaped, spongey; smoky, earthy, nutty flavor; expensive and also available canned and dried. The darker the mushroom, the more pronounced is the flavor. This mushroom must be cleaned well when fresh due to its dimpled head.
 

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wellington

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Great info kelly. You made me very hungry for mushrooms with all those pics. I love them. I play it safe with myself and any animal that may eat them. I buy them from the store. That way I can't go wrong. I have family that likes to pick from the wild, so I know you have to know your stuff before you just start eating them.
 

bouaboua

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Wow!

Thank you very much for sharing such wonderful info. Very useful.

Thank you.
 

tortadise

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Mushrooms are delicious indeed. There's so many of them and we frequently get asked which ones are safe. So I thought I do a thing on it. I love to eat them too, but would never pick my own.
 
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