Jonathan the Tortoise

wellington

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I'm thinking a Gallop and whether it's a Gallop or Aldabra, it's not the last of its kind. However, possibly the last of the actual strain. Or however, they call it.
 

wellington

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Actually I think it is a Seychelles Giant Tortoise, which he would then possibly be the last one. However, I have never figured out yet, if that still equals Aldabra.
I thought Gallop, cuz I think the Gallop is ugly compared to the Aldabra and this one with the flatter head and more pointed face, seemed more like a Gallop.
Not saying Gallops are ugly, just not as cute as the Aldabras and I don't like how the Gallops always have funky eyes.
 
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russian/sulcata/tortoise

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Actually I think it is a Seychelles Giant Tortoise, which he would then possibly VW the last one. However, I have never figured out yet, if that still equals Aldabra.
I thought Gallop, cuz I think the Gallop is ugly compared to the Aldbra and this one with the flatter head and more pointed face, seemed more like a Gallop.
Not saying Gallops are ugly, just not as cute as the Aldabras and I don't like how the Gallops always have funky eyes.
Aldabra! none of the Galapagos tortoises have nuchal scutes! this one has a nuchal scute!
182-year-old-tortoise-jonathan-4.jpg
 

tortadise

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Jonathan is indeed an Aldabra. However he is specific island species. Aldabrachelys gigantea Arnoldi is his full species. Incredibly rare population from the islands. A lot like Galapagos tortoises Aldabras too have many different sub species on different islands. Most have become extinct, and not all of them were giants either. Just at the end of the 1800s there were 4 species that became extinct from pirates(just like the Galapagos) best these were small ones. Smaller than sulcatas and larger than leopards. Easier to transport to the ships.
 

tortadise

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how many are there?
Not many. All the population of the st.helen tortoise population were transferred to silhouette island where the breeding program is. As to how many adults and total animals of that island locale I don't know. Haven't found any record of them and they sure aren't on display for public viewing when people visit the island. 4 island subspecies are extinct though. They're just like the Galapagos. All sub species under one species but DNA and Phylogeographically classified different but still under the species gigantea. Many island hold vastly different specimens. Some stay smaller too around 300-350 pounds for adult males, where as other islands have 500-600 pound males like what Greg has. Reunion island, cerf(pronounced surf), round, mahe, Zanzibar, a bunch more I can't remember off the top of my head.
 
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