Is Organic pesticide okay?

Jenna524

Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2021
Messages
34
Location (City and/or State)
Central Valley, CA
I have a veggie garden for the family. I am battling some various pests/bugs that want to eat it before it’s ready to harvest. I would like to keep it chemical free so that our Sulcata can enjoy the leaves. I am aware that chemicals are not okay for tortoises. What about store-bought organic options? For example, I’ve posted the ingredients of a possible organic pesticide option from the store. Are these ingredients going to hurt our Sulcata? Is there any store-bought option that works for veggie gardens and still is okay for tortoises? (Non-chemical pesticide options specific to getting rid of bugs on the plants I’m feeding the tortoise).
 

Attachments

  • 67FB182C-E5BB-4ED7-AAA6-BC87CA90C1A7.jpeg
    67FB182C-E5BB-4ED7-AAA6-BC87CA90C1A7.jpeg
    970.9 KB · Views: 11

TisMary

Active Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2021
Messages
126
Location (City and/or State)
New York
I have a veggie garden for the family. I am battling some various pests/bugs that want to eat it before it’s ready to harvest. I would like to keep it chemical free so that our Sulcata can enjoy the leaves. I am aware that chemicals are not okay for tortoises. What about store-bought organic options? For example, I’ve posted the ingredients of a possible organic pesticide option from the store. Are these ingredients going to hurt our Sulcata? Is there any store-bought option that works for veggie gardens and still is okay for tortoises? (Non-chemical pesticide options specific to getting rid of bugs on the plants I’m feeding the tortoise).
Hi @Jenna524. Good for you looking into "non-chemical pesticide options" for the plants you intend to feed your tortoise! Stick with it and you'll learn some very interesting stuff!

The label you show looks to come from Dr. Earth Organic and Natural Final Stop® Yard & Garden Insect Killer, am I right? If so, I encourage you to read the rest of that label where it warns you to avoid contact with skin, eyes, or clothing; and to wash your hands after handling. There are also some hefty conditions and limitations of liability - all of this gives me pause and IMHO, I wouldn't use it near my tortoise.

Have you looked into using Sentry Plants? I don't have much experience with this (yet), but it looks promising to me. You might also check out Old Farmer's Almanac Garden Pests and Diseases. Do you know any certified organic gardeners in your area? You could try talking to them. What do they do to control pests? How about your local Cooperative Extension? I have found them to be very helpful. Do you know about OMRI (Organic Materials Review Institute)? I think it's definitely worth understanding what they do and how they can help.

I encourage you not to blindly follow anyone's lead on these things. Do your own research, educate yourself, and make up your own mind. You're on the right track! Good luck!
 

Mrs.Jennifer

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jul 22, 2020
Messages
411
Location (City and/or State)
Norwich CT
I have a veggie garden for the family. I am battling some various pests/bugs that want to eat it before it’s ready to harvest. I would like to keep it chemical free so that our Sulcata can enjoy the leaves. I am aware that chemicals are not okay for tortoises. What about store-bought organic options? For example, I’ve posted the ingredients of a possible organic pesticide option from the store. Are these ingredients going to hurt our Sulcata? Is there any store-bought option that works for veggie gardens and still is okay for tortoises? (Non-chemical pesticide options specific to getting rid of bugs on the plants I’m feeding the tortoise).
What pests are you specifically looking to get rid of? There are some non-toxic options depending on the pest in question.
 

RosemaryDW

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Feb 17, 2016
Messages
3,873
Location (City and/or State)
Newport Coast, CA
Even if it were safe—I’m not smart enough to have an opinion on that—those oils are very strongly scented, strong enough that it may throw him off whatever you’re offering.

Wait, I take that back. While I doubt it would be enough to cause real harm I wouldn’t offer anything that had garlic oil on it; that’s from a plant family where all the bulbs are toxic.
 

Jenna524

Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2021
Messages
34
Location (City and/or State)
Central Valley, CA
Hi @Jenna524. Good for you looking into "non-chemical pesticide options" for the plants you intend to feed your tortoise! Stick with it and you'll learn some very interesting stuff!

The label you show looks to come from Dr. Earth Organic and Natural Final Stop® Yard & Garden Insect Killer, am I right? If so, I encourage you to read the rest of that label where it warns you to avoid contact with skin, eyes, or clothing; and to wash your hands after handling. There are also some hefty conditions and limitations of liability - all of this gives me pause and IMHO, I wouldn't use it near my tortoise.

Have you looked into using Sentry Plants? I don't have much experience with this (yet), but it looks promising to me. You might also check out Old Farmer's Almanac Garden Pests and Diseases. Do you know any certified organic gardeners in your area? You could try talking to them. What do they do to control pests? How about your local Cooperative Extension? I have found them to be very helpful. Do you know about OMRI (Organic Materials Review Institute)? I think it's definitely worth understanding what they do and how they can help.

I encourage you not to blindly follow anyone's lead on these things. Do your own research, educate yourself, and make up your own mind. You're on the right track! Good luck!
Thank you for your very thoughtful response! I will definitely do my research, and I'll look at your links.
 

Jenna524

Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2021
Messages
34
Location (City and/or State)
Central Valley, CA
What pests are you specifically looking to get rid of? There are some non-toxic options depending on the pest in question.
In my veggie garden something is eating little tiny holes in the leaves of my new seedlings. It's too small to be a snail. The hibiscus has something, too, I think to have identified as a midge. For the hibiscus I've tried to cut off the buds when they turn yellow so they don't fall into the soil, which seems to help. But one of the hybiscus just seems to continue to have the buds turn yellow, and now the leaves are turning yellow, and sometimes have black spots. So maybe there's more than midges? If you have any help to identify what's up it would be appreciated. And how to get rid of it? Thanks!
 

Jenna524

Member
Joined
Mar 16, 2021
Messages
34
Location (City and/or State)
Central Valley, CA
Even if it were safe—I’m not smart enough to have an opinion on that—those oils are very strongly scented, strong enough that it may throw him off whatever you’re offering.

Wait, I take that back. While I doubt it would be enough to cause real harm I wouldn’t offer anything that had garlic oil on it; that’s from a plant family where all the bulbs are toxic.
Good insight, thank you. I think it's time to look at some other options.
 

Mrs.Jennifer

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Jul 22, 2020
Messages
411
Location (City and/or State)
Norwich CT
In my veggie garden something is eating little tiny holes in the leaves of my new seedlings. It's too small to be a snail. The hibiscus has something, too, I think to have identified as a midge. For the hibiscus I've tried to cut off the buds when they turn yellow so they don't fall into the soil, which seems to help. But one of the hybiscus just seems to continue to have the buds turn yellow, and now the leaves are turning yellow, and sometimes have black spots. So maybe there's more than midges? If you have any help to identify what's up it would be appreciated. And how to get rid of it? Thanks!
Usually Hibiscus leaves and buds turn yellow from stress, not pests. Typical situations are due to not enough watering or overwatering. The holes sound like pests. Diluted Dawn dishwashing liquid in a spray bottle will help with aphids and mites. If it is something you can’t see, I’m not sure it will help. Good luck!
 

TisMary

Active Member
Joined
Mar 1, 2021
Messages
126
Location (City and/or State)
New York
For the hibiscus I've tried to cut off the buds when they turn yellow so they don't fall into the soil, which seems to help. But one of the hybiscus just seems to continue to have the buds turn yellow, and now the leaves are turning yellow, and sometimes have black spots. So maybe there's more than midges? If you have any help to identify what's up it would be appreciated. And how to get rid of it? Thanks!
Hi @Jenna524 - here is a thread from earlier this year about hibiscus pests: Hibiscus. So - you're not alone!

Here is an article that gives many reasons for yellow leaves: Hibiscus Leaves Turning Yellow? (How to Revive it) and here is one about black spots: What Is Causing Brown or Black Spots on the Back of the Leaves of My Hibiscus Plants? I just did a coupla google searches - there's a lot out there - give it a try to find other content.

Anyway, I bought my first Hibiscus ever this year and, in the house, it got loaded with aphids. I set it outside so they didn't spread to my other indoor plants and - pleasant surprise - something ate all the aphids! Now my hibiscus if very happy! Could it have something to do with my ad? 😁

Ladybug Cafe - cropped.png

Happy Hibiscus in the Creeping Thyme patch!
Hibiscus - double whammy2.jpg
 

Maro2Bear

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
May 29, 2014
Messages
12,406
Location (City and/or State)
Glenn Dale, Maryland, USA
In my veggie garden something is eating little tiny holes in the leaves of my new seedlings. It's too small to be a snail. The hibiscus has something, too, I think to have identified as a midge. For the hibiscus I've tried to cut off the buds when they turn yellow so they don't fall into the soil, which seems to help. But one of the hybiscus just seems to continue to have the buds turn yellow, and now the leaves are turning yellow, and sometimes have black spots. So maybe there's more than midges? If you have any help to identify what's up it would be appreciated. And how to get rid of it? Thanks!

Take a look at Safers Insecticidal soap, or even Dawn soap detergent. Mix the “soap” at low concentrations/ratios. My mixes of soap water have deterred those pesky green worms on our hibiscus. Sprays kill off the nasty pests, but the plant is still edible. No problems here in Md with our Sulcata with such minimally invasive soap sprays.

Ps - always good to wash down any leaves before fed to your tort.
 
TortoiseSupply.com

New Posts

Top