Im worried about my tourtise.

mads3732

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My Russian tourtise is recovering from a reapitory infection with the help of antibiotics. This has been going on for two weeks. I've noticed that he has been sleeping alot other them when I take him outside which he is SUPER active. I mean practically running a marathon active. Then came the issue with eating. He would sleep so much that when I placed food down, he would sniff it and go back to his hide or bury. If I didnt move him in the mornings it's like he wouldnt move at all. I soak him everyday and take him outside as much as I can when the weather is warm. Not sure what to do
 

Yvonne G

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When a tortoise is taken outside into unfamiliar territory, he runs frantically around trying to find a safe place to hide. He's super active because he's afraid. Unless you have a pen/yard that's dedicated to the tortoise, with safe fencing and plantings, I would not take him outside.

Being on antibiotics curbs a tortoise's appetite. He should start eating again once the treatment if over with. Just keep soaking him daily for about 15 or 20 minutes, in warm water then place him in front of the food. Then every time you think about it during the day dig him out and place him in front of the food.

May we please see pictures of him in his enclosure?
 

Kapidolo Farms

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What is the actual diagnosis? What drug and route were used? Oral or injected antibiotics put a strain on the system that clears the tortoise of the drug and the dead pathogenic organisms (kidneys and liver) as well as dehydrates the tortoise for the clearing effort.

Often the signs (snot) of a respiratory issue will go away when the tortoise is kept at higher temps within the suitable range, and that is when they should be treated.

I've had two tortoises with upper respiratory issues (the exact offending organism was not identified, but the clinical symptoms suggest a mycoplasma) and they were brought up to temperature for several days, the snot cleared and the treatment was a topical nasal flush as the suspected mycoplasma does not actually invade any systemic parts of the respiratory track, but rather sits on the surface of the mucous membrane. Systemic drugs will not come into contact with the pathogen that sits on the surface of the membrane. There are many false positive cured tortoises out there, simply because husbandry was improved (higher temps in the suitable range) but owning nothing to systemically used drugs.
 

mads3732

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When a tortoise is taken outside into unfamiliar territory, he runs frantically around trying to find a safe place to hide. He's super active because he's afraid. Unless you have a pen/yard that's dedicated to the tortoise, with safe fencing and plantings, I would not take him outside.

Being on antibiotics curbs a tortoise's appetite. He should start eating again once the treatment if over with. Just keep soaking him daily for about 15 or 20 minutes, in warm water then place him in front of the food. Then every time you think about it during the day dig him out and place him in front of the food.

May we please see pictures of him in his enclosure?
 

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mads3732

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Apr 21, 2020
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Harrington
What is the actual diagnosis? What drug and route were used? Oral or injected antibiotics put a strain on the system that clears the tortoise of the drug and the dead pathogenic organisms (kidneys and liver) as well as dehydrates the tortoise for the clearing effort.

Often the signs (snot) of a respiratory issue will go away when the tortoise is kept at higher temps within the suitable range, and that is when they should be treated.

I've had two tortoises with upper respiratory issues (the exact offending organism was not identified, but the clinical symptoms suggest a mycoplasma) and they were brought up to temperature for several days, the snot cleared and the treatment was a topical nasal flush as the suspected mycoplasma does not actually invade any systemic parts of the respiratory track, but rather sits on the surface of the mucous membrane. Systemic drugs will not come into contact with the pathogen that sits on the surface of the membrane. There are many false positive cured tortoises out there, simply because husbandry was improved (higher temps in the suitable range) but owning nothing to systemically used drugs.
Originally the signs I saw (snot and decreased activity) were about a week old when I brought him in. The vet told me it was a reapitory issue and gave him antibiotics in the form of shots once a week for three weeks. Before I took him I increased the temps and gave him warm water soaks everyday but I was nervous and took him in anyway because I didnt notice a change.
 

Kapidolo Farms

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This is a pretty good rundown that may help you and/or your vet.

Originally the signs I saw (snot and decreased activity) were about a week old when I brought him in. The vet told me it was a reapitory issue and gave him antibiotics in the form of shots once a week for three weeks. Before I took him I increased the temps and gave him warm water soaks everyday but I was nervous and took him in anyway because I didnt notice a change.
 
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