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I need help in determining how many gallons I have in my new pond.

ZEROPILOT

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Cool. Thanks. That a hair over 2,000 gallons.
That should do it since there are deeper and shallower areas. The average is at least 3 feet deep.
The filtration I'm using is rated for 2,000 gallons. I'll need more if I stock the pond with Midas cichlids.
 

Markw84

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Ed, I always like to give a safety factor in filtration. The rated number from manufacturers is pretty basic and does not account for variables. Locations, water temps, amount of shade, aeration, type of plants, size and number of fish/turtles, etc. Some manufacturers will also rate their filters by inches of fish. That is more telling than gallons in a pond. But even then, 20 - 1" fish are not going to produce the waste of 2 - 10" fish, so you can see the problem with either way.

It seems once we have a pond, and things are doing well, there is always something else we see - another fish or turtle, we will want to add. Better to size up the filter system. Or at least design to allow for upgrades. Both pump size and filter size. Plus, where you live, with warmer water temps, the filter will work harder than in cooler areas.

Perhaps a link to the filter you are considering, and I can give some thoughts.
 

Teodora'sDAD

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Ed, I always like to give a safety factor in filtration. The rated number from manufacturers is pretty basic and does not account for variables. Locations, water temps, amount of shade, aeration, type of plants, size and number of fish/turtles, etc. Some manufacturers will also rate their filters by inches of fish. That is more telling than gallons in a pond. But even then, 20 - 1" fish are not going to produce the waste of 2 - 10" fish, so you can see the problem with either way.

It seems once we have a pond, and things are doing well, there is always something else we see - another fish or turtle, we will want to add. Better to size up the filter system. Or at least design to allow for upgrades. Both pump size and filter size. Plus, where you live, with warmer water temps, the filter will work harder than in cooler areas.

Perhaps a link to the filter you are considering, and I can give some thoughts.
I couldn't agree more. What I tell me customers is that you should be putting your water volume through a filter once an hour.
Its refreshing to see people putting out accurate information.
 

ZEROPILOT

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Ed, I always like to give a safety factor in filtration. The rated number from manufacturers is pretty basic and does not account for variables. Locations, water temps, amount of shade, aeration, type of plants, size and number of fish/turtles, etc. Some manufacturers will also rate their filters by inches of fish. That is more telling than gallons in a pond. But even then, 20 - 1" fish are not going to produce the waste of 2 - 10" fish, so you can see the problem with either way.

It seems once we have a pond, and things are doing well, there is always something else we see - another fish or turtle, we will want to add. Better to size up the filter system. Or at least design to allow for upgrades. Both pump size and filter size. Plus, where you live, with warmer water temps, the filter will work harder than in cooler areas.

Perhaps a link to the filter you are considering, and I can give some thoughts.
I'm going to ad a skimmer and a gravel bed filter to the system and we'll see how it goes.
I already own a Smartpond WPR2000, 2,000 GPH pump from Lowes. (The reviews aren't very good) And a Smartpond PBF2000UV cannister filter with back flow for cleaning. Also not very highly rated. Oh, well.
I also am using 1.5" tubing. Already bought it. And parts and slate for a return by waterfall for extra oxygenation and background noise.
I own a skimmer. I found it at the flea marker. I'm planning on running the skimmer with a 650 GPH pump I already have and run it through a gravel bed and lava rock filter and out via the waterfall.
The skimmer will be directly across from the waterfall and the waterfall will be about 1/3 the size of the pond itself.
The gravel bed will also be used for aquaponics. (SPELLING) With it's own overflow.
 

ZEROPILOT

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Thanks for all of the help.
I'll keep an eye on my water parameters as is cycles and as I begin to ad fish.
Since the filters are pressurized and fed by pumps, can I just link two together?
 

Markw84

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It seems we all did gravel bed filtration years ago. I did create a problem with cleaning if incorporated in the pond itself. If outside the main pond, it does make a nice bog filter type setup.
 

ZEROPILOT

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My smaller ponds had simple Becket X-5 filters. The ponds were much smaller and the Beckets did a great job with 5 foam tube filters on each. The pump motors cost about $65 and lasted about 4 years before the impeller shafts fell apart.
What I DIDN'T like was trying to "fish" the whole thing out of the ponds every month or two to swap out 3 or 4 of the sleeves.
 

ZEROPILOT

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It seems we all did gravel bed filtration years ago. I did create a problem with cleaning if incorporated in the pond itself. If outside the main pond, it does make a nice bog filter type setup.
Yes. Outside the pond.
It's Florida. Everything is a bog.;)
This will be nothing like your fantastic pond. Not even in the same category. In fact, I think your pond is why I ripped out mine in shame.
 

Markw84

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Yes. Outside the pond.
It's Florida. Everything is a bog.;)
This will be nothing like your fantastic pond. Not even in the same category. In fact, I think your pond is why I ripped out mine in shame.
Cooincidentally, Right this minute I am doing an update on my pond build thread. This is the section I explain everything about how I do filtration! I should be done in about 10 minutes. Look for it...
 

Teodora'sDAD

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I'm going to ad a skimmer and a gravel bed filter to the system and we'll see how it goes.
I already own a Smartpond WPR2000, 2,000 GPH pump from Lowes. (The reviews aren't very good) And a Smartpond PBF2000UV cannister filter with back flow for cleaning. Also not very highly rated. Oh, well.
I also am using 1.5" tubing. Already bought it. And parts and slate for a return by waterfall for extra oxygenation and background noise.
I own a skimmer. I found it at the flea marker. I'm planning on running the skimmer with a 650 GPH pump I already have and run it through a gravel bed and lava rock filter and out via the waterfall.
The skimmer will be directly across from the waterfall and the waterfall will be about 1/3 the size of the pond itself.
The gravel bed will also be used for aquaponics. (SPELLING) With it's own overflow.
Skimmers are a great way to remove debris that fall on the surface of the pond water. Take note... It has been my experience that ponds with skimmers tend to accumulate a lot of debris on the bottom. This is simply due to some organic and fish waste being heavy enough that is sinks to the bottom before it reaches the filter. I normally advice running a small pump down in the bottom to help "stir" the water enough that the debris can get caught by the skimmer. Another thing you can do which I like much better is add a few air stones to the bottom of the pond in certain areas. That has a couple more benefits. While the bubbles help stir the water and debris, the WHOLE water column gets oxygenated. Highly oxygenated water put your good bacteria on STEROIDS!.. So they actually work better for you with helping to keep the pond clear.
I would also advise that you don't make too large of a gravel bed (I'm guessing you mean bog?) They work wonderfully but the pond plants love to take them over and sometimes if not maintained properly can accumulate extra debris causing more bad than good. So keep it manageable.
Also, when it comes to canister filters I always tell customers that SOMETHING is better than nothing. (with the exception of in pond filters). So use it and make sure you wash the pads about once a week. Like I said before make sure that water volume is going through a filter once an hour for best results. Is your skimmer hooked up to a waterfall box of some sort or are you using the skimmer as a filter by itself?
 

Teodora'sDAD

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I have a feeling @Teodora'sDAD might be more worthy of "pond king"! I have simply found a way that works for me that I am passing along...
The update is done!
Advice is great to give. With ponds it can be harder because if you and both of your neighbors have a pond, I wouldn't be surprised if each one does things a little differently to keep the pond functioning. A pond owner will sometimes have to experiment with things before they find what really works for them. I always tell the new owners to be a sponge and soak up as much as possible. That way you can try different things if you run in to a problem.
 

Teodora'sDAD

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I haven't seen any of his work.
Oh I wish I still had my pond. moved out of my house about ten years ago and left behind a beautiful 10,000 gallon pond that I miss very much. Been working on my degree and renting for now. I have a 500 gallon Rubbermaid tank that I keep just to give me my pond fix. lol I will have another in the future for sure. Mean while I work for a large garden center here in Michigan for the past 20 years. I have helped thousands of people with their ponds. I am great with plants and fish health as well.
 

Kapidolo Farms

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ZEROPILOT

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South Eastern Florida (U.S.A.)/Rock Hill S.C.
Skimmers are a great way to remove debris that fall on the surface of the pond water. Take note... It has been my experience that ponds with skimmers tend to accumulate a lot of debris on the bottom. This is simply due to some organic and fish waste being heavy enough that is sinks to the bottom before it reaches the filter. I normally advice running a small pump down in the bottom to help "stir" the water enough that the debris can get caught by the skimmer. Another thing you can do which I like much better is add a few air stones to the bottom of the pond in certain areas. That has a couple more benefits. While the bubbles help stir the water and debris, the WHOLE water column gets oxygenated. Highly oxygenated water put your good bacteria on STEROIDS!.. So they actually work better for you with helping to keep the pond clear.
I would also advise that you don't make too large of a gravel bed (I'm guessing you mean bog?) They work wonderfully but the pond plants love to take them over and sometimes if not maintained properly can accumulate extra debris causing more bad than good. So keep it manageable.
Also, when it comes to canister filters I always tell customers that SOMETHING is better than nothing. (with the exception of in pond filters). So use it and make sure you wash the pads about once a week. Like I said before make sure that water volume is going through a filter once an hour for best results. Is your skimmer hooked up to a waterfall box of some sort or are you using the skimmer as a filter by itself?
I'm using the skimmer with its own pump motor and it will be feeding the gravel bed and return near or at the waterfall. The skimmer has filter media in it.
I have purchased a solar air pump that should supply some aeration during the sunlight hours.
The main pump motor will be sitting on bricks inside the pond and feeding the waterfall via the pressurized enclosed filter. It has an 18 watt UV.
Part of the pond will get partial sun. The rest is shade.
 
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