Greek/Margie Cross Male

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TylerStewart

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I got this male "Ibera Greek" as part of a trade (agreed to it before I saw it). I can't help but think it has some marginated blood in it. Whatever it is, it's un-needed here, and I'd be open for offers on trades. The rear end flares out pretty extreme like a marginated would. It's super active, always moving, and looks much better if it wasn't dusty, straight out of the pen. Unless you're convinced it's pure, it probably shouldn't be added to a breeding project (it humps everything from rocks to small bushes to heads of romaine). E-Mail me at [email protected] if interested. I'm in no hurry, he's just roaming a spare pen and isn't in the way. I've had him since about September 2010, and he hibernated here in the ground this past winter. If anyone has any better ideas what it might be (GBTorts, for example), I'd be interested in thoughts. I've been told it was just an oddball Ibera male, but it looks too different from other Ibera Greeks I have here. I have two of them, likely brothers. The other is still here also. The belly is solid gray/black.

 

GBtortoises

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Hey Tyler, when you get a chance post or send me some pics of the plastron and a straight on top view. I don't think it's a Ibera/Marginated hybrid but it's also doesn't appear to be a purebred Ibera. But I couldn't say from just the one photo either.
I like a good mystery!
 

TylerStewart

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Looks like this guy is shipping out on Monday. Thanks, GB, for the feedback. You can't really see it too much in the photo, but the rear end just flares weird like a marg, and it really made me think marg, but who knows. I was told it was Ibera Greek, and another tortoise buddy suggested it was Ibera Greek that looked weird. I took a few overhead shots last night also. Maybe for entertainment's sake, I'll shoot you an e-mail with more pics tonight or this weekend.
 

Tim/Robin

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My first thought is that it may be a Caspian Greek. GB has a very nice Caspian female that this could have been a great match. My male Caspian/Zagros Greek flares a lot like this one. It could very well be a tortoise that you don't see many of in the states. I agree with Gary that it doesn't look like a hybrid. Hopefully whoever is picking him up has a compatible female. :)
 

GotTurtles

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I picked up a trio of greeks a few years ago. Two big girls and a smaller male that had the huge flares on the rear of the shell. I gave them to a friend of mine and every year they produce normal looking greek babies. I want to see if the young males get the flares like their daddy.
 

GBtortoises

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It's not that unusual for some Greek subspecies to have flared rear marginals. It can vary greatly from population to population, as can alot of other identifying features. That's part of the reason that Greek subspecies are often very difficult to accurately identify. It's also one of the reasons that I often hesitate to do so!
The Greek subspecies have always been and probably will always be in constant flux. The recognized subspecies change often depending upon what research you choose to accept.
Ibera Greeks often have very flared rear marginals, most of my adults in two seperate groups, from two different geographical areas do. Some even coming close to that of Marginated tortoises.
 
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