Free virtual tortoise trip to southern Africa

Kapidolo Farms

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Go to this web page

http://sarca.adu.org.za/sarca.php

Select the tab on the left side called "virtual museum"

in the new window select the tab called "species maps"

now in the middle of the new pull down page, use the scrolling name function/tool to find the species of interest, let try "stigmochelys pardalis".

Click the buttons/selection tools for the type of result you may want. I often use the default settings, that means I won't click any of the buttons, just leave them as they are.

Then click search.

The resulting map shows all the species/subspecies under that genus/species as they are recognized by the herpetologists who have created this web based museum, and have compiled the information.

You can do the same procedures to see images submitted, of live animals as found in the field, not dead preserved specimens, by making the second step of clicking "search VM" and using the same selection tools for whatever species you are interested in.

It's a virtual tour of all the herps, including tortoises, of southern Africa. This is about the best virtual museum I have found with English as the primary language. Lots of great detail, and with a little work on your part, you can cross reference with similar plant data bases to see what grows there, and still a bit more looking at local cities and using http://www.fallingrain.com/world/index.html to see the climate of the exact location.

The tools and resources for sorting out parameters for leopards, hingebacks etc. are pretty good. The fallingrain webpage is global, not just Africa. There are other virtual museums on the web, but the SARCA virtual museum is exemplary.

Have a safe trip!
 

mikeh

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While back I came across this photo in the virtual museum. Almost all black leopard. Would like to know if genetics play a role or is a result of constant exposure to sun at high elevation with higher UVB?
1385150505278.jpg
 
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Kapidolo Farms

Well-Known Member
Tortoise Club
5 Year Member
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Nov 7, 2012
Messages
5,084
Location (City and/or State)
South of Southern California, but not Mexico
Re: RE: Free virtual tortoise trip to southern Africa

mikeh said:
While back I came across this photo in the virtual museum. Almost all black leopard. Would like to know if genetics play a role or is a result of constant exposure to sun at high elevation with higher UVB?

Yeah, I guess that one is Stigmochelys (Geochelone) pardalis pardalis pardalis pardalis pardalis pardalis etc.

Mike, I've had the same speculative idea about high uvb, almost like they get a tan or something. I've no basis or explanation for why on how black this one is.
 
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