Feed baby leopard only from what's growing around my house? + won't eat grassland tortoise diet

leoturt

Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
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49
Location (City and/or State)
Western Canada
Trying to feed only stuff that grow naturally (most of them) from around our house to try to stay away from store bought salads (since lettuces are not very nutritious, for one) and other foods. There is the exception of grassland tortoise diet that I try to feed it too.

These are:
-various grasses (my 3 month old baby leopard enjoys eating grass) - but it will not eat storebought catgrass/wheatgrass
-ribwort plantain (it devours them)
-dandelion weed and flower
-cat's ear
-hawksbeard or hawkweed (can't remember which one)
-hawkbit
-hen and chicks succulent (we planted a few years ago)
-red deadnettle

I'll mix in like 3-4 of these foods for each day, along with grasses.

My main question is, is this enough variety? Sometime I will throw in some store bought food like radicchio or something else, but that's hard these day cus of the pandemic.

there's a bunch of other plants growing that I haven't looked into yet and will try to feed if they are safe by looking at the tortoise table.

Overall, there isn't a ton of those plants growing around our house so I'm looking to plant them myself to have more of them available later.
If anyone has any tips for growing any of the plants (except grass and weeds) listed above, let me know.

Lastly, I bought zoomed grassland tortoise diet, but the baby hates it. Even if i mix it in, the baby will stay away from it and try to slide it off using it's arm while it's eating plants that have it sicking to them. Any tips on helping it to like grassland tortoise diet?
 
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Blackdog1714

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Soak the pellets and chop all the greens before mixing all together. Then drop a pile and see. Kinda like a finely chopped salad. Good luck with the picky eater although you have an excellent selection to use without buying anything. I would also add hibiscus
 

leoturt

Member
Joined
Aug 25, 2019
Messages
49
Location (City and/or State)
Western Canada
Soak the pellets and chop all the greens before mixing all together. Then drop a pile and see. Kinda like a finely chopped salad. Good luck with the picky eater although you have an excellent selection to use without buying anything. I would also add hibiscus
Sorry I forgot to mention that I do soak the pellets until they're mushy.
I usually do chop everything and mix together (which I also forgot to mention) and it may or may not eat the small amounts of wheat grass that sticks with the other food it's eating.

I haven't been able to find any hibiscus where I live -not in any stores or out in the wild. Someone told me they are more of a southern US thing and I'm in the west cost of canada
 

Blackdog1714

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Location (City and/or State)
Richmond, VA
Sorry I forgot to mention that I do soak the pellets until they're mushy.
I usually do chop everything and mix together (which I also forgot to mention) and it may or may not eat the small amounts of wheat grass that sticks with the other food it's eating.

I haven't been able to find any hibiscus where I live -not in any stores or out in the wild. Someone told me they are more of a southern US thing and I'm in the west cost of canada
@Kapidolo Farms sells quality dried plant products to include hibiscus
 

Tom

The Dog Trainer
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Tortoises are creatures of habit. They eat what they've eaten before. Now foods take some time to introduce. Sometimes months.

Soak a tiny tiny piece of a ZooMed pellet in a bottle cap with a little water. Cut up your day's greens and wet them. Then mix in that pellet mush very thoroughly. In time your tortoise will like the pellets and seek them out. Most of mine hated them at first, but after a long introduction while gradually adding more and more over weeks of time, they come to love it. Its good stuff, so its worth the time investment.

It sounds like you have a good variety of greens around your house, but always try for more. Add in endive and escarole, cilantro, arugula, collard, mustard, and turnip greens, etc...
 
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