Coconut Oil

Anyfoot

Well-Known Member
5 Year Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
6,312
Location (City and/or State)
UK Sheffield
Craig!!!! Where the heck ya been????
Busy as usual. I’m hoping 2020 everything will be sorted regarding my house, then I can concentrate on torts again.
Yvonne. I know many will disagree. But I am absolutely convinced these animals need high protein at a young age. Yes hydration too, but if I don’t feed protein they pyramid at 6 months onwards. I have literally tried everything and I’m getting mixed results. You just can not keep redfoots wetter than I have and still got pyramiding torts. I think they all species eat protein in the form of bugs, insects, slugs and fungi when very young. These foods also coincide with wetter times.
 

Beasty_Artemis

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2016
Messages
587
Location (City and/or State)
Oregon Coast
I just applied oil to my two new hatchlings today! Such vibrant markings. I resisted putting oil on the shell of my first redfoot for the first year or two, but l definately regret that now. These little guys are definitely getting oil on them - asap!
 

Macca33

Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2020
Messages
50
Location (City and/or State)
MN
I’ve tried this. Anyone out there. Try this with northern redfoots. You’ll get mixed results. Forget Brazilians. They grow smooth easily. The northern redfoots are a pain to grow smooth. I’m guessing sullies and Indians are the same.
I realize I am replying to a post that is over a year old, but I thought it worth the bump--- and as I am fairly certain I have a northern redfoot (Venezuelan variety)… and some experience with using coconut oil I thought I would chime in.

When I got my redfoot, Raph, about a year ago he (she?) was already a juvenile. His shell was pretty smooth but he had a puncture in his shell between the scutes roughly above the left “shoulder.” It seemed hollow, jagged. The puncture did not change one bit for months under “proper” environmental conditions and diet (varied diet of the recommended sort, lots of greens, mazuri, occasional proteins, fruits, etc. 80-85% humidity and temps in the low 80s). If the puncture did change or heal in that time, it was barely noticeable.

As I understand it, shell damage such as punctures takes A LONG TIME to heal.

Then I started applying coconut oil to the puncture, letting it “soak in and melt” before wiping the excess away but leaving most of it in the puncture. This seemed to activate something. The scutes around the puncture and the skin below seemed to be responding in some way (I have not had time to research specifics). Over time, I developed a routine where I skipped applying it excessively into the puncture but would put a teaspoon or so of coconut oil in Raph’s bath water and scrub his shell with a toothbrush and the oil. And also making sure that I scrubbed the puncture gently with the oil. I did this weekly then every-other week.

The result over a few, 6 months maybe?, has been remarkable. The puncture is filling in and noticeably healing. Quite amazing really. I will try to post some pics in the near future for anyone interested.

BTW, I have not been on the forum for almost a year and I have missed it. I hope all are well.

Warmly,

Dan
 

Jan A

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jan 9, 2021
Messages
324
Location (City and/or State)
Boulder, CO
I realize I am replying to a post that is over a year old, but I thought it worth the bump--- and as I am fairly certain I have a northern redfoot (Venezuelan variety)… and some experience with using coconut oil I thought I would chime in.

When I got my redfoot, Raph, about a year ago he (she?) was already a juvenile. His shell was pretty smooth but he had a puncture in his shell between the scutes roughly above the left “shoulder.” It seemed hollow, jagged. The puncture did not change one bit for months under “proper” environmental conditions and diet (varied diet of the recommended sort, lots of greens, mazuri, occasional proteins, fruits, etc. 80-85% humidity and temps in the low 80s). If the puncture did change or heal in that time, it was barely noticeable.

As I understand it, shell damage such as punctures takes A LONG TIME to heal.

Then I started applying coconut oil to the puncture, letting it “soak in and melt” before wiping the excess away but leaving most of it in the puncture. This seemed to activate something. The scutes around the puncture and the skin below seemed to be responding in some way (I have not had time to research specifics). Over time, I developed a routine where I skipped applying it excessively into the puncture but would put a teaspoon or so of coconut oil in Raph’s bath water and scrub his shell with a toothbrush and the oil. And also making sure that I scrubbed the puncture gently with the oil. I did this weekly then every-other week.

The result over a few, 6 months maybe?, has been remarkable. The puncture is filling in and noticeably healing. Quite amazing really. I will try to post some pics in the near future for anyone interested.

BTW, I have not been on the forum for almost a year and I have missed it. I hope all are well.

Warmly,

Dan
Definitely post before & after photos if you've got them!! Interesting theory & application of that theory.
 

Kothy

Member
Tortoise Club
Platinum Tortoise Club
Joined
Sep 6, 2020
Messages
36
Location (City and/or State)
Connecticut
I use the one shown from Amazon about once every two months, to my two Cherry heads, they love the rub down. But what i love the most is the little TINY bugs don't bother there shells anymore. They have stopped invaliding them. I know the bugs are harmless, they just creep me out. Both my babies are Happy and healthy and I have done this for a year.
 

Cathie G

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2018
Messages
6,972
Location (City and/or State)
Lancaster
I realize I am replying to a post that is over a year old, but I thought it worth the bump--- and as I am fairly certain I have a northern redfoot (Venezuelan variety)… and some experience with using coconut oil I thought I would chime in.

When I got my redfoot, Raph, about a year ago he (she?) was already a juvenile. His shell was pretty smooth but he had a puncture in his shell between the scutes roughly above the left “shoulder.” It seemed hollow, jagged. The puncture did not change one bit for months under “proper” environmental conditions and diet (varied diet of the recommended sort, lots of greens, mazuri, occasional proteins, fruits, etc. 80-85% humidity and temps in the low 80s). If the puncture did change or heal in that time, it was barely noticeable.

As I understand it, shell damage such as punctures takes A LONG TIME to heal.

Then I started applying coconut oil to the puncture, letting it “soak in and melt” before wiping the excess away but leaving most of it in the puncture. This seemed to activate something. The scutes around the puncture and the skin below seemed to be responding in some way (I have not had time to research specifics). Over time, I developed a routine where I skipped applying it excessively into the puncture but would put a teaspoon or so of coconut oil in Raph’s bath water and scrub his shell with a toothbrush and the oil. And also making sure that I scrubbed the puncture gently with the oil. I did this weekly then every-other week.

The result over a few, 6 months maybe?, has been remarkable. The puncture is filling in and noticeably healing. Quite amazing really. I will try to post some pics in the near future for anyone interested.

BTW, I have not been on the forum for almost a year and I have missed it. I hope all are well.

Warmly,

Dan
I've seen something like that too. I don't really use it often and if I do it's a little like you do. I kinda think it helps to get them cleaner with a soak and a toothbrush. But one thing I noticed that was really nice was it is helpful in healing shell problems. Mine had some when I got him. In a healthy tortoise I can see how it could be too much because it softens and causes a tiny bit of swelling. In a tortoise with problems it was a positive thing for me.🙂
 

Macca33

Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2020
Messages
50
Location (City and/or State)
MN
I collected some photos today (harder than I thought, damn phone storage, lol) and here is the photo timeline of what I saw:
Here he is in the pet shop, end of January 2020
Raph in petshop jan23 2020.jpg
Kinda hard to see the puncture... here it is after I brought him home sometime in feb 2020:
Raph at home Feb 2020.jpg

Not too long after this photo I started with the coconut oil. Then I noticed this:
Raph puncture healing activated by coconut oil march_april 2020.jpg
You'll notice the light-colored tissue. This is not an infection. It did not smell at all. In the next pic you'll see the light, soft tissue was absorbed or hardened into the shell somewhat:
soft white tissue seems to have been absorbed by shell April_may 2020.jpg
These should give you an idea of the process. The puncture seemed to fluctuate between the stages shown in the last two pics.

Now here is a pic from this month:
Feb 2021 puncture is closed up.jpeg


In less than one year the puncture is nearly gone. I think it's pretty amazing. However, I was not being "scientific" in trying to isolate the effect of coconut oil- there were other variables too. I also upped Raph's proteins and fruits...thinking that fats, proteins, and high-calorie food would provide needed energy and nutrients for healing.

You will also likely notice that Raph has pyramiding...not extreme but his shell was noticeably smoother when he was younger. But the puncture is basically healed.

For the heck of it, I'll post just two more pics shortly- one of his smooth shell and one from very recently.

I welcome any and all comments/discussion. I think this is all very interesting. Thanks for reading!!
 

Cathie G

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 9, 2018
Messages
6,972
Location (City and/or State)
Lancaster
I collected some photos today (harder than I thought, damn phone storage, lol) and here is the photo timeline of what I saw:
Here he is in the pet shop, end of January 2020
View attachment 318814
Kinda hard to see the puncture... here it is after I brought him home sometime in feb 2020:
View attachment 318815

Not too long after this photo I started with the coconut oil. Then I noticed this:
View attachment 318816
You'll notice the light-colored tissue. This is not an infection. It did not smell at all. In the next pic you'll see the light, soft tissue was absorbed or hardened into the shell somewhat:
View attachment 318817
These should give you an idea of the process. The puncture seemed to fluctuate between the stages shown in the last two pics.

Now here is a pic from this month:
View attachment 318818


In less than one year the puncture is nearly gone. I think it's pretty amazing. However, I was not being "scientific" in trying to isolate the effect of coconut oil- there were other variables too. I also upped Raph's proteins and fruits...thinking that fats, proteins, and high-calorie food would provide needed energy and nutrients for healing.

You will also likely notice that Raph has pyramiding...not extreme but his shell was noticeably smoother when he was younger. But the puncture is basically healed.

For the heck of it, I'll post just two more pics shortly- one of his smooth shell and one from very recently.

I welcome any and all comments/discussion. I think this is all very interesting. Thanks for reading!!
It takes both care of a wound and extra nutrition for any animal to heal including us. Just my opinion 😁
 

Macca33

Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2020
Messages
50
Location (City and/or State)
MN
Okay, here are three pics. First one just after bringing Raph home. The last two are from today, you can see the pyramiding but I wouldn't say it looks extreme...

youngling Raph:
soon after Raph was brought home from shop.jpg


And here are two from today:
Raph Feb 20 2021.jpg

Raph Feb 20 2021 x.jpg


In looking at the before and after pics, you can almost see where/how the pyramiding will take shape...it is already slightly indicated in his shell when he was younger.

As many have suggested, I think it is partly genetic, but also likely due to diet and rate of growth. Someone on the forum compared it to a "high resolution 3D printed image" versus a "low resolution 3D printed image" and suggested that it has more to do with the speed/rate of growth. Fast growth (low res) will cause pyramiding versus slow growth over longer time (high res) will look smoother. wish I knew who it was off the top of my head. But I like that theory...it seems to make sense.

With that, I don't think coconut oil prevents pyramiding; but I do see how it helps with shell health and healing- based on my experience in having a tort only one year. I would recommend tort owners keep some on hand.
 
TortoiseSupply.com

New Posts

Top