Chinese Frog Eyed Gecko

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TortoiseBoy1999

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My older sister just got a Chinese Frog Eyed Gecko from the reptile show in Pamona on Saturday and she was wondering......How often should she feed him, Should she keep his heat pad (at the bottom of the tank) on during the day? Or at night, and does he need a water dish? Thanks!!!!! (BTW he eats crickets)
 

jaizei

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Isn't this the type of stuff you research before you buy an animal?
 

TortoiseBoy1999

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jaizei said:
Isn't this the type of stuff you research before you buy an animal?

Hey! I didn't buy it! She did! And she got all excited when she saw him! (typical) :p Also she has a job so she's going to spend However much money she needs to for him :)
 

poison

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i feed all my animals as much as they want if fed the correct diet theres no need to worry about it getting obese

and yes they do need heat and water
 

poison

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chase thorn said:
I would personally ask a Gecko forum (no offense TFO)... But I wouldn't trust a Gecko forum for tortoise info!

a lot of people here are also on other reptile forums :(
 

poison

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its probably to cold. what are the temps and what are you measuring it with?
 

TortoiseBoy1999

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poison said:
its probably to cold. what are the temps and what are you measuring it with?

Ok. This is going to sound stupid.....Like EXTREMELY stupid but.....She doesn't have a thermometer. All she has is the tank, sand, a heating pad, some wood and a hide. (and the gecko of course) :/ Please no one think anything of ME this was HER choice! It is not MY gecko it's her's so please no dirty looks [if that's even possible on a forum] or any dis respect because of this. I am merely trying to help her out.
 

TortoiseBoy1999

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Floof

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Have you done a web search to find care sheets yet? It looks like there's a forum dedicated to Frog-eyed Geckos over at Geckos Unlimited (http://www.geckosunlimited.com/community/frog-eyed-geckos-teratoscincus/)--there's probably a care sheet (or a thread linking to good care sheets) to be found, as well. Judging by the lack of real response to your request for info, I'm guessing there aren't any frog-eyed gecko keepers here on TFO... So a visit to a specialized forum is most definitely in order.

Now, I don't know anything about frog eyed geckos, so I'm just going to pitch a piece or two of general herp info that I'm fairly certain applies to FEGs as much as any other gecko or nocturnal herp.

1: As has already been pointed out, she NEEDS to get a thermometer. Just like with tortoises or any other herp, knowing the temperatures the gecko is being kept at is vital. The refusal to eat could be as simple as relocation stress, but it could also be a case of being kept too cold or even too hot. (Or any other factor--but I won't get into that here.)

She needs a couple good digital thermometers so she can measure the cold side and the hot spot of the terrarium, at minimum. Even better would be a temp gun (preferably in addition to the digital thermometers) so she can measure the temperature at any spot she desires in the enclosure to be sure there isn't any spots that are too hot or cold.

2: If she is going to use a heat pad, she NEEDS to get a thermostat. Really, a thermostat would be best for whatever heating elements she uses. A thermostat will keep the hot spot's temperature in the proper range (that is, the range you set it at--so be sure to research what that range is), so you don't have to worry about the gecko getting overheated by an overzealous heating element. This is especially true with heat pads, which, without fail, get MUCH too hot for a reptile to safely utilize unregulated. I have personally measured two different sizes of ZooMed heating pads running in excess of 120*F (as high as 140, IIRC, on one!). A good thermostat is vital to the proper keeping of any nocturnal reptile heated by a heat pad. (They're also super handy for keeping CHEs in check, especially if the temperature of the room it's in fluctuates a lot.)

Thermostats come in all range of price and quality. Generally speaking, lower price means lower quality. The cheapest thermostats available without sacrificing reliability seem to be the Zilla thermostat and the Hydrofarm thermostat. Both run about $30. The highest quality thermostats are also the most expensive--I swear by my Herpstat, absolutely fantastic product, but even the basic model runs $100+. (Helix and Vivarium Electronics are two others that I have heard are high quality, and run in the $100+ range.)

3: I don't know if it stands true for frog-eyed geckos, so I'm just going to offer a basic warning. Sand can cause problems. Be sure she researches proper FEG substrate before she commits to the sand option, and be sure to research other options--for example, it would be worth looking into whether a sand/coir mixture would be appropriate (less impaction risk than straight sand due to the more organic, easily digested material of coconut coir and similar "dirt"-type substrates).

Also, as Daniel mentioned, the "calcium sand" type products from pet stores are no good. There has been evidence suggesting they are even more dangerous than regular ol' washed, sifted play sand from the hardware store. Both can cause impaction, but the calcium sand seems to create a looser blockage that is much more difficult to remove and treat. Some products may be more likely to cause blockage as the edges of the particles are rougher, rather than the smoother particles that generally make up play sand. There have also been reports of geckos purposely eating calcium sand in a misguided attempt to ingest much needed calcium and minerals, making that impaction possibility much more likely.

4: This one I know holds true for any reptile. Hiding places. She needs at least 2. One on the cool side, and one over the heating element. Even better if she can provide 3 or more, in different temperature zones. This allows the gecko to feel safe and offers several options so the gecko doesn't have to choose between safety and the proper temperature zone.

Safety (whether there's enough hides/cover) and temperature are two major contributing factors to getting a reptile to eat. As well, make sure she leaves it alone for a week (that is, no handling unless absolutely, life-or-death necessary) so it can settle in and get comfortable in its new quarters. If not allowed that time to acclimate to its new home, the gecko may continue to refuse to eat due to being stressed out.

Hope this helps some. Kudos for stepping up and making sure your sister cares for the gecko right. :)
 

bmt123

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I would not worry about not eating it is usual for a reptile to not eat for the first couple of days.
 

Floof

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bmt123 said:
I would not worry about not eating it is usual for a reptile to not eat for the first couple of days.

On the contrary, it's fairly normal for many species to refuse to eat for the first few days or even weeks in a new home. The hardier, less easily stressed species will often eat readily, but for more delicate, stress-prone animals, a period of refusal while they adjust to the new environment is fairly normal. Seems we hear about it regularly on TFO in regards to some tortoise species--hatchlings and things like Sulcatas will often eat fairly readily when they come to a new environment, but older, wild-caught Russian tortoises and others will frequently refuse for a few days to, in some cases, a few weeks.

This refusal to eat is often perpetuated by the new owner not knowing about the acclimation period and insisting on handling or otherwise interacting with the animal, stressing it out more and making it even less likely to eat anything.

Frog-eyed geckos, from what I've read so far, appear to be a more delicate species, and very likely one of those that will refuse for at least a few days as they adjust to a new environment. It's if they continue to refuse and/or begin to lose weight that you should worry.

To the OP, how is the gecko doing so far?
 
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