Building a new indoor enclosure

Amanda81

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i am not from the USA, but I imagine it to be available in large chain hardwares. just ask for clear epoxy(no fillers) with a long pot life, the long cure time is what makes it laminating epoxy. fast cure epoxies can't be used for laminating because it will harden before it can be applied evenly and absorbed by the wood.

I will check into that. Thank you!!
 

HLogic

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Sorry such a late reply, I just now seen your post, must have skipped over it.
Is the laminating epoxy available at like Home Depot or lowes?
My enclosure is going to be one large enclosure but I am planning to section it off with a 12" wall, that way I don't have to have separate heat and lighting systems but neither can get to the others space or see each other. Like you, I too would like if they could live together but it's not recommended so I will keep them separate.

The easiest place to find it probably would be a boat or auto supply shop. Be prepared, it is not inexpensive.
 

Amanda81

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I was thinking about stopping by a ace that sells boats, see if they had a varnish or something. (Not sure what it's actually called). I figured it would be pretty expensive, all the other epoxy I have checked on has been pricey.
 

J.P.

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yeah, epoxy is expensive. but it can last a looooong time. it really depends on what you want.
epoxy enamels are a cheaper (and easier to apply) alternative, but you'd loose the nice wood furniture look.
 

Amanda81

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The look real don't matter. The bottom will be full of dirt, covering it and I plan on covering the walls with sheets of bark. That's the plan at this point. I spent hours carefully removing sheets of bark from downed trees and I have been drying it out all winter so I hope it works as I planned. That's the main reason I would prefer to deal the wood instead of using plastic sheeting. I planned to liquid nail the bark to the walls and if I use plastic sheeting I would have to use nails which I fear will split the sheets of bark.
 

johnsonnboswell

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Start a compost pile and make your own compost. It's great stuff to mix with coconut coir for substrate, and by itself makes the best potting soil.

Coir is used for rooting, and it's good for that, but it's not nutrient rich & plants won't thrive in it without some sort of plant food. Compost is nutrient rich and drains well.
 

Amanda81

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Start a compost pile and make your own compost. It's great stuff to mix with coconut coir for substrate, and by itself makes the best potting soil.

Coir is used for rooting, and it's good for that, but it's not nutrient rich & plants won't thrive in it without some sort of plant food. Compost is nutrient rich and drains well.

I have been thinking of making a compost pile for a while. I usually fertilize my landscape a couple times between spring and fall but can no longer do that due to the the Sudans having dull run so I thought about going that route outside, I never thought about using it in my enclosure. Thanks.
 

Amanda81

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What type of organic or no additive potting soil so you use? Is there a certain brand that would be best?
 

johnsonnboswell

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I don't buy dirt, so someone else will have to jump in with a recommendation. I do top dress my garden beds with semi finished compost for fertilizer and mulch.
 

Amanda81

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I have been doing some shopping for items for the new enclosure and as I was looking for my substrate I came across some called Plantation Soil. It comes in the bricks and looks like the Eco Earth I'm use to using. So as I compared the 2 products I noticed that in the description of the plantation soil it says it is good for live plants, the Eco earth description doesn't say anything about being beneficial for live plants.
Since I am planning to plant live plants I would like to use something that will benefit them, has anyone used this plantation soil? Is it the same product as Eco earth or does it have some type of difference? I want to plant the majority of the enclosure with grasses. I have started a couple 9x13 pans with wheat grass that I will just transplant right into the substrate and then I also have some sheets of fescue I am going to transplant in, I will randomly plant some weeds and other random stuff throughout as well, I guess I'm shooting for how my yard is kinda, just inside. Of course during the warm months they will b outside the majority of the day but if I can get it to do what I want it to, it will be really nice for the cold months when outside isn't an option.
 
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