ALDABRA TORTOISE BREEDER

Tolis

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Tortoise Club
Joined
Aug 10, 2020
Messages
171
Location (City and/or State)
Cyprus EU
My lawn has sod work also known as crambus and I am looking for a tort friendly solution to get rid of it. It has expanded in the aldabra enclosure and it is pointless to only spray the one side of the garden. You have acres of grass I assume you must have faced similar problems in the past. Any tips?
 

ALDABRAMAN

KEEPER AT HEART
10 Year Member!
Joined
Nov 5, 2010
Messages
28,307
Location (City and/or State)
SW Forida
My lawn has sod work also known as crambus and I am looking for a tort friendly solution to get rid of it. It has expanded in the aldabra enclosure and it is pointless to only spray the one side of the garden. You have acres of grass I assume you must have faced similar problems in the past. Any tips?
~ We have improved pastures (irrigated), never any issues. Suplliment during the winter/dry season.
 

ALDABRAMAN

KEEPER AT HEART
10 Year Member!
Joined
Nov 5, 2010
Messages
28,307
Location (City and/or State)
SW Forida
~ My new breeder barn is 18x36 and mostly concrete with industrial hurricane grade doors. It has a 46" solid poor stem wall with a 24x36 footer under the stem wall. The dirt is five loads of high quality dirt from a cow field that i had hauled in from over 100 miles away. The electrical outlets, switches and electrical breaker box are all elevated and are strategically located for future back up heating sources. The main heaters (one primary and one back up) are commercial grade, only one is needed at a time to sufficiently heat the entire barn in the coldest of nights in our region. All electrical supply lines, etc. are buried extra deep and fully encased for extra safety. The entire barn has a direct cut-out switch in the main residence that totally cuts all power in the entire fields. I think this should be very functional and efficient. One thing the electrician did was flip all the outlets, meaning the ground hole is on top instead of the usual location of being on the bottom. I asked him why, he explained it was an old electrician trick to help avoid triggering the breaker. Since he knew all the electrical cable plug ins were going to go upward and not downward, he thought it would be better and more suited. Has anyone else ever heard of this?
ALDABRAMAN IMG_8033.JPG IMG_8029.JPG IMG_8030.JPG
 

wellington

Well-Known Member
Moderator
10 Year Member!
Tortoise Club
Joined
Sep 6, 2011
Messages
40,446
Location (City and/or State)
Chicago, Illinois, USA
~ My new breeder barn is 18x36 and mostly concrete with industrial hurricane grade doors. It has a 46" solid poor stem wall with a 24x36 footer under the stem wall. The dirt is five loads of high quality dirt from a cow field that i had hauled in from over 100 miles away. The electrical outlets, switches and electrical breaker box are all elevated and are strategically located for future back up heating sources. The main heaters (one primary and one back up) are commercial grade, only one is needed at a time to sufficiently heat the entire barn in the coldest of nights in our region. All electrical supply lines, etc. are buried extra deep and fully encased for extra safety. The entire barn has a direct cut-out switch in the main residence that totally cuts all power in the entire fields. I think this should be very functional and efficient. One thing the electrician did was flip all the outlets, meaning the ground hole is on top instead of the usual location of being on the bottom. I asked him why, he explained it was an old electrician trick to help avoid triggering the breaker. Since he knew all the electrical cable plug ins were going to go upward and not downward, he thought it would be better and more suited. Has anyone else ever heard of this?
ALDABRAMAN View attachment 331871 View attachment 331872 View attachment 331873
Is this at your new property? It doesn't look like the house I remember in the old pics from way back.
The doors for the barn are the roller ones?
 

Conservetheworld

New Member
Joined
Jul 20, 2021
Messages
1
Location (City and/or State)
Tacoma
Wow this is beautiful. First post. Long time lurker. I'm based in Washington State, near Seattle... really really wanting an Aldabra in the future but I'm not sure if the climate can be modified enough for it :( planning an outdoor enclosure and everything for my sulcata but probably need a whole greenhouse for the aldabra. Thoughts?
 

Fluffy

Member
10 Year Member!
Joined
Jun 22, 2011
Messages
13
Location (City and/or State)
West Virginia
One thing the electrician did was flip all the outlets, meaning the ground hole is on top instead of the usual location of being on the bottom. I asked him why, he explained it was an old electrician trick to help avoid triggering the breaker. Since he knew all the electrical cable plug ins were going to go upward and not downward, he thought it would be better and more suited. Has anyone else ever heard of this?
As a contractor and a Home Inspector I was told it's done in commercial settings to prevent something from either dropping down on the prongs or something being placed there on purpose to short out the circuit. Think like a kid in school. I was also told they hold the plug better that way when a cord is being pulled on. Could all be a lot of hooey but it made sense to me lol.
 
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