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Would you spend $5000 on a Galapagos tortoise hatchling?

Discussion in 'Debatable Topics' started by spikethebest, Aug 19, 2013.

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  1. spikethebest

    spikethebest Active Member 5 Year Member

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    Just curious what everyone's opinion would be on the pros and cons of buying a couple of galapagos tortoise hatchlings for $5,000 each.
  2. Nay

    Nay Active Member 5 Year Member

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    RE: Would you spend $5000 on a Galapagos tortoise hatchling? I am about to buy 2.

    Yikes!! Well if it's your dream, you feel good about the purchase place, have the accomodations, and it won't keep food from the youn'ns mouth, hey go for it, you only live once!!Just make sure to keep posting pics is all I can say, so we can live our dreams throuugh your purchase!!!
    Good Luck.
    Nay
  3. LeopardTortLover

    LeopardTortLover Member

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    How much space do you have?

    I wouldn't - i don't have the money :p
  4. tortadise

    tortadise Well-Known Member Moderator 5 Year Member

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    Many options that go into place here. They do get huge like the aldabras. But there are very few private breeders that are successful with reproducing them. Zoos even have tough time with them. San Diego is successful, Gladys porter is a huge producer. And a few more. That's it. most of them are different sub species and the studbook won't allow them to be hybridized and studbook registered. I'd say you have 4-7 successful private keepers that produce them. They also lay pretty small clutches and have low fertility rates. So babies are not often to come by. They are a remarkable species and endangered at that. So the more knowledgeable people to have them the better. Heck if I like a certain box turtle that just fancies my taste I'd pay anything for something I like. If its looked at from only a money stand point. Then no you should not purchase one. Dedication and desire typically outweigh money in this industry.
  5. ILoveTortoises2

    ILoveTortoises2 Member

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    Couldn't say it any better then you just did :)
  6. Jabuticaba

    Jabuticaba Well-Known Member Today is my birthday!

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    Five grand certainly discourages those who can't afford to provide for them, especially once they're full grown, and demand more space and adequate environment.


    May[CHERRY BLOSSOM], Hermann's [TURTLE][TURTLE] & Aussie [DOG FACE][DOG FACE][DOG FACE] (@YWG)
  7. Turtulas-Len

    Turtulas-Len Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    Your young, live in a good climate, know tortoise care, have the room, look at it as an investment. and go for it.
  8. mike taylor

    mike taylor Well-Known Member

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    No way babies die too easy. Now if it was a year or two old maybe .

    Sent from my C771 using TortForum mobile app
  9. BeeBee*BeeLeaves

    BeeBee*BeeLeaves Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I would!
    I would if I could and had everything just right for one.
    Other than that, like tortadise and Len said. Perfectly said by both.
  10. johnsonnboswell

    johnsonnboswell Well-Known Member

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    If you feel so attached to it that you simply must pay the ransom, then yes. I wouldn't do it, but that's because I don't want one enough & don't have the place for it.
  11. Jacqui

    Jacqui Wanna be raiser of Lemon Drop tortoises Moderator 5 Year Member

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    I know I have a poor memory, but didn't you have one?
  12. tortadise

    tortadise Well-Known Member Moderator 5 Year Member

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    Who me? No those were some other rare specimens of tortoises. I will be getting some though for sure. Not babies. But I did spend the last 9 months creating an exhibit and proper set up for this species. Still needs a little TLC like the wallering hole. Which these species tend to need as they utilize them on the volcano hill sides. They truly are a lot different than an Aldabra. Some species are dry island habitats and can get serious fungal infections and die. Many zoos have had that happen. Some require rainy seasons, some cant be on grass but eat nothing but grass. Galaps are a very very interesting species. All of the sub species are surely different and require many different needs. The opinion from me again, is if your mentally and physically(housing, proper habitat, well researched etc...) ready to take the commitment they are worth any amount of money that the prospective buyer will be willing to pay. This goes for any species of turtle/tortoise, or animal. Even a human child. <---------uh oh might be a can o worms right there. :D
  13. Millerlite

    Millerlite Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    5k is not bad, I've seen then anywhere from 3-5k and that's really not that much considering adults are in the 10-20k range depending on size and sex it can go even higher.

    Really question is do you have room? They are huge just like the aldabras but it sure would be cool to have one


    Check out my site and channel:
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  14. jtrux

    jtrux Well-Known Member

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    Absolutely
  15. Baoh

    Baoh Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    Spikethebest, did something happen to your Galapagos?

    As for the question, yes, I would if I wanted one. However, I would generally rather keep an Aldabra. Of course, I could just have both if I wanted to, too.
  16. Jacqui

    Jacqui Wanna be raiser of Lemon Drop tortoises Moderator 5 Year Member

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    No, Cory (Spikethe best). I think it's name was "littlefoot"?
  17. cdmay

    cdmay Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    It would depend on a lot of things. First of all (besides having the $$ I mean) I would want to know exactly which Galapagos tortoise I was getting. Life Fellowship here in Florida used to produce a lot of them not too long ago and they were 'only' $800.00. But the lineage of their breeders was somewhat in question.
    To me, unless you simply want a giant tortoise as a pet, it is somewhat pointless to invest in such an animal without actually knowing what kind of Galapagos tortoise you are getting. Many of the captives in the U.S. are a hodgepodge of races and that greatly diminishes their value as future breeders.
    Now, if one of the smaller saddleback Galaps (Hood or Duncan) were available in an unadulterated form, I would jump on them.
  18. N2TORTS

    N2TORTS Well-Known Member 5 Year Member

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    You would never know what species you have with out extensive DNA testing , and even those results would be sketchy, as natural hybridization takes place and has been for 1,000 of years already on the islands.

    In CMI’s stunning Darwin documentary, The Voyage That Shook the World, we see an evolutionary expert refer to the astonishing types of hybridization, or crosses, that have taken place on the islands, even between two seemingly very different types of animal(but are really not). The film raises this as an argument for a young age for the islands—thousands of years. The reasoning is, as CMI geneticist Dr Rob Carter points out in Voyage, that the Galápagos species “made the jump from the mainland in the first place, and it’s 600 miles away, but the major islands are some 30, 40-odd miles apart … . so over deep time, over millions of years, the species would jump again and again and again and again, and you get all sorts of hybridization, and you get a blurring of the species lines*NATURALY*. The obvious is definitely natural selection in action, but not evolution. The possibility for these variations was already coded in the DNA of the tortoises’ ancestors, which allowed the tortoises to adapt to varying levels of vegetation and other environmental factors.

    Over 10 sub-species have been identified (four of which are extinct), because they have distinct physical characteristics. But they can all interbreed with one another, so they are classified as one species of tortoise, Geochelone nigra.

    It’s very easy to use a diagram showing in principle how several tortoise varieties can arise from one, simply by sorting already-existing genes via natural selection. For example, the smaller islands tend to be drier, so they don’t support much grass; the only vegetation is cactus and shrubs. So tortoises with saddlebacked shells that can browse will be able to eat, while domed tortoises starve. Thus the only tortoises to pass on their genes to the next generation are the saddlebacked ones.
    The most distinctive difference among the sub-species is the variation in the shape of their shells.


    Galápagos Conservation Trust, Galápagos giant tortoise, gct.org/tortoise.html, accessed 17 August 2009. Return to text. Walker, T., Don’t fall for the bait and switch: Sloppy language leads to sloppy thinking, Creation29(4):38–39, 2007
  19. tortadise

    tortadise Well-Known Member Moderator 5 Year Member

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    Well put JD. I agree with Carl too. Last I looked at my papers on it. Isabella island has 4 subspecies all within very close range of each other. Volcano dwellers. I'm not too certain and its getting off topic. But I looked into getting some phenotype analysis done on some tortoises. I believe it was duke university that can possibly do it. buuuuut they can't just test it and tell you what it is. they need a known pure haplotype to test against.
  20. CourtneyG

    CourtneyG Active Member

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    I have seen Galapagos hatchlings that are already a few inches sell for $3,500 each, that is a much better deal. I would buy one for that price, but not for 5K.
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